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  • Protecting from rust

    I've made a few tools for my lathe/mill so far using mild steel. Unfortunately, I can go weeks between projects. Other than keeping the tools (angle plates, 123, DTI mounting rods) oiled is there a better way?
    I don't mean paint as I want the bare metal finish.

  • #2
    Get a gallon of LPS3 and coat those things with it. Easy to wipe off and your tools won't rust from sitting.

    BTW - Put in your location. Answers to this question will be better if we know if you are in Phoenix or Tampa.

    Steve

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    • #3
      I found rusting tools has a lot to do with your skin chemistry. When I touch metal tools and let them sit they tend to rust unless I lightly oil them. Some people don't have this problem. I have watch backs that corrode due to my skin.

      Moisture is the big problem. If you can wipe your tools down and place them in a bag with desiccant they will be fine. I'd probably go this route if you don't want to oil them. If you need to wear gloves so you don't leave residue on them as you bag them up.
      www.thecogwheel.net

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      • #4
        I'm in Southern MD.
        It's not that I don't want to oil. It's wondering if there is a better way.
        Thanks for the inputs!

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        • #5
          I am in Rhode Island and it can get humid in the summer. My shop is in the basement, (walk out with garage door). I used to keep two of the basement windows open in the summer with insect screens on them. I had a big rust problem. Started keeping the windows closed and only opened the door when something had to come in or out. Now I have almost no rust problem. I think the warm humid air constantly coming in would condense on the cool iron and rust. Now mostly the oil form just using the machines from time to time is enough. I spray silicone on the tables of wood working tools which seems to do it and doesn't leave oil on the wood, makes the wood slide easier too. I am sure my system wouldn't work for everyone but it is working for me. Conditions would be different for all of us.

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          • #6
            I have had good results with Boeshild. It is an aerosol with ailcents dispersing a wax coating. For storage you can leave it on heavy and for working tools, after it drys, you wipe it down and it leaves very protective film. I use it on machined tables like my drill press, jointer and band saw. It kasts a long time, is self healing and easily removed.

            Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              In a woodwork shop use beeswax. Not often reported to cause allergies so everything you touch will not contaminate your hands and you can dunk your biscuits with no oily film on your coffee. Silicone in any form is best avoided owing to its habit of contaminating surface you want to paint.
              For metal a clear car underbody sealant like Waxoyle, diluted, can be used to leave a waxy film suitable for many surfaces and I find it less unpleasant to handle than oils and greases.

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              • #8
                Paste wax. I swear by it.

                I plan to do some condensation tests to prove its rust protection soon, when I have the time and a few different oils to test.

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                • #9
                  Air conditioning. I swear by it. Got to have it in Texas. Dehumidifier might be sufficient in cooler climates.

                  RWO

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                  • #10
                    I've never used anything other than whatever motor oil I happen to have open to supply the bikes or cars. And shop made tools and other items that are well over 20 years old are still bright and silvery looking. So just a light coat of common lubricating oil CAN be enough.

                    You'll pretty quickly realize if it is or not just by how other items in your shop rust or stay clean. For example the dry saw cut surfaces of scraps from my metal bandsaw stay bight and shiny for weeks in the scrap bucket. if you live in an area where your shop conditions are such that a similar bare steel surface would become dull and reddish in only a few days then I can see that there might be a case for something more capable than simple regular lubricating oil. But that's not the case in my situation so I've never felt any need for anything more protective than a coating of oil which I then wipe mostly off so there's only a light film remaining.

                    In the wood shop a can of Johnson's paste wax is never far from arm's reach to use on the metal tables of the various tools. And it does a pretty good job as well. And won't stain the wood. I've gotten some beeswax recently and I may try that as well. But it's mostly intended to be converted to a bullet lube.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Ok .. a little strange, but I have found an oil based wood stain will protect ferrous metals pretty good. I guess because it was formulated to penetrate wood, it sinks into the pores in metal and dries very thin. Good on outdoor stored tools for about a year. Never tried as u intend though.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RWO View Post
                        Air conditioning. I swear by it. Got to have it in Texas. Dehumidifier might be sufficient in cooler climates.

                        RWO
                        +1 for this.
                        I stopped the rust in my shop by buying two dehumidifiers.
                        I run them year round.
                        Bill
                        I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Juiceclone View Post
                          Ok .. a little strange, but I have found an oil based wood stain will protect ferrous metals pretty good. I guess because it was formulated to penetrate wood, it sinks into the pores in metal and dries very thin. Good on outdoor stored tools for about a year. Never tried as u intend though.
                          I do much the same as this. But not with "stains" that have a pigment in them. For some years now I treat my shovels and other garden tools with a 50-50 mix of mineral spirits and boiled linseed oil. After cleaning and a quick drying I rub it on from a cheap brush left in the tin that holds the mixture. I don't know about soaking down into pores in the metal but it does do a nice job of not running off the metal because it cures to a thin protective varnish like film instead of running off and allowing the tools to rust while sitting in the harsh conditions of the garden shed.

                          Because it's an oil finish which dries to a film I would not want to use the same stuff or that pigmented stain on items in the shop I handle frequently.

                          It's also something I use because I have it around all the time. Boiled linseed oil is a favorite finish for many of my wood working projects. And I keep mineral spirits around as a common solvent for many uses. So mixing up a batch when needed to keep the garden tools in good condition isn't a big stretch. And if I had any left over fence finish oil stain I'd likely use it as well since it's much the same ingredients but with some added pigment.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Not even when I'm taking my pain meds with a glass of wine can I imagine painting my angle plates, 123 blocks, DTI rods or other precision tools with an oil based stain or linseed oil.

                            Steve

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                            • #15
                              My favourite go-to for a rust preventative is Rust Check. It's a light oil based rust preventative that has a creeping agent and anti rust additives.
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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