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Whatzit, tool, gauge, ???

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  • old mart
    replied
    If you want to see a Talos missile in the flesh, pop over to Buffalo, NY, and go aboard the USS Little Rock, they are bloody huge.

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  • Andre3127
    replied
    Originally posted by GEP View Post
    I am going to the gym in the morning 7am i will be looking for rats there is a pretty one
    Haha no no, I was referring to somebody who goes to the gym a lot. Bar rat, gym rat, etc. But I guess if you had nutria rats in the area, who knows you might see one working out sometime

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  • GEP
    replied
    Originally posted by Andre3127 View Post
    looks like a dumbbell paper weight for the gym rats.
    I am going to the gym in the morning 7am i will be looking for rats there is a pretty one

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  • Cannonmn
    replied
    Thanks for the ideas.

    I did some lookups and figgerin' to see if it would work as a hold-back link for say a Navy trainable guided missile launcher aboard a warship. The long shank will break in tension over a range of tensions depending on the exact bronze alloy used, but I picked one with a mid-range tensile strength of 40,000 psi. Since the x-sec area of the shank is 0.194 square inches, breaking load in tension would be Somewhere around 7760 lbs.

    The two older Navy guided missiles for which booster thrust figures are available are Talos and Terrier, with 111k and 59k lbs. respectively. All that tells me is that if the missile booster functions correctly there is a 100% probability that the much weaker bronze shank will snap apart and release the missile, which is what the ship's captain wants of course.

    But all this mumbo-jumbo doesn't prove that's what the dumbbell is, it just means it could be used that way on those two systems. The corrosion resistance of bronze is a good thing for any Navy deck-mounted items such as the now-obsolete trainable launchers.

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  • Andre3127
    replied
    looks like a dumbbell paper weight for the gym rats.

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  • awemawson
    replied
    Pipe cleaning 'pigs'

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  • Cannonmn
    replied
    Good ideas. O.D. Pretty close to 40mm but don't think it is a bore gauge, the military would have to have a way to attach it to a rod or something. Overnight I was thinking about it and hit on this patent for aircraft hold-back device. The real tension pins for carrier aircraft are 5" long but mine is half of that, so maybe mine is a hold-back for rocket or guided missile systems. ???

    https://www.google.com/patents/US2853257

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  • boslab
    replied
    Looks like a pipe bore guage that I had for pneumatic air transport systems (sometimes I stuck it up the line to clear a stuck container) saw similar r at a mandrel bending company who did swept bends too
    Mark

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  • Benta
    replied
    A Go/No-go gauge to check for barrel wear in 50 mm cannons?

    Benta.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    A dumbbell for someone with tiny hands...

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  • dave_r
    replied
    Definitely a dumbell for a cat. The flat is so it doesn't roll away, but should have been a little larger, as it's mate has disappeared.

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  • TGTool
    replied
    Spark proof hammer that won't roll off the bench?

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  • Cannonmn
    started a topic Whatzit, tool, gauge, ???

    Whatzit, tool, gauge, ???

    15.6 oz, 2 3/4" long, about 1.6" dia. Came with some others identical in a load of misc stuff from a US Dept of Defense Ordnance activity. It was either cast and then machined or was machined from a solid round bar. The small flat areas are at each 90 degrees around the two large diameters. My guess on material is bronze. IHNI.



    Last edited by Cannonmn; 11-12-2016, 08:52 PM.
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