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90 degree joint in rotating shafts

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  • 90 degree joint in rotating shafts

    I think I may make this next. Not because it has any real practical purpose, more just because it is such a neat mechanical motion.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Xbx...ature=youtu.be
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-13-2016, 12:00 PM.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    Nice gadget, cleverly conceived but you can't have it just sitting there waiting for someone to crank it. It has to have a connected load.

    I suggest your mechanism be connected to run something equally whimsical like this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ef0t3Q-QqMY

    But original, clever, not mundane like a "BS grinder." Maybe multiple reciprocating/polar/rotary outputs radially arranged each driving its own mechanical curiosity, including a geared music-box movement tinkling out a compelling musical motif like "Fur Elise" or this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da4yNrOodi4.

    I think of it done up in Nineteenth Century elegance in glittering brass and German silver on a walnut burl base.

    But hey, it's your project.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 11-13-2016, 02:24 PM.

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    • #3
      Seems like an ideal arrangement to run your equally whimsical ball elevator "around a corner".
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Very interesting...I have a notion that that principle was used in some line shafting installations.

        Aha! That took only a minute to find...
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsUF1wP22iM


        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbpJphkmffQ


        Google 'Almond coupling' for more information.

        I look forward to seeing your version Brian!
        Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 11-13-2016, 03:50 PM.

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        • #5
          Okay--From concept to reality. Now it is modelled as I would actually build it, and detail drawings are finished. If I don't have any "real work" this coming week, at least I have an interesting project!!
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Since it has a vertical sliding motion component, perhaps that part could become a pump of some kind-
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              I know it is Brian's project but I can't resist the temptation to suggest a variation...!

              Presumably there could be two output shafts and they would be contra rotating(?)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                I know it is Brian's project but I can't resist the temptation to suggest a variation...!

                Presumably there could be two output shafts and they would be contra rotating(?)
                You are right. that would be delightful!! put your money where your mouth is, head out to your shop and make one that way. Here are the drawings.
                Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-13-2016, 04:20 PM.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • #9
                  And three more


                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #10
                    And the last two.

                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • #11
                      And last but not least, an assembly drawing.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Looking at those videos my first thought was "bevel gears would be SOOOOO mu........ oooooooh, shiny..." Watching the links and other bits in action was downright mesmerizing. I figure that they needed the full covers on those overhead shaft tranfer hubs not just to keep dust and birds' nests out of the work but to stop the workers from getting hypnotized just watching them.

                        Brian your ball elevator is going to look SOOO much cooler with this joint along side to turn the direction of the drive.....
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          It occurs to me that the proposed mechanism does not have to have the output shaft in the same plane along the reciprocating axis as the input. It and its bearing can be placed anywhere along the reciprocating tube and its angle can be made wrench adjustable. Further, multiple output shafts at any angle and spacing can be added along the length

                          Reciprocating and rotating mass increases as the reciprocating tube is extended. A second tube of equal mass can be installed inside the power transmitting tube (we need part names!!) and made to reciprocate and rotate in opposite phase with it. This adds mechanical complication and parts count but the drive will be versatile and smooth running suitable for low powered mechanisms at odd distances and angles to be set at installation where rotary input and output have to be timed.
                          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 11-13-2016, 10:29 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I spent most of the day working in a factory across town that uses me for engineering work they need done. Then I came home and played. I have a most wonderful collection of "bits and bobs" that all have a home on the wonky joint. I had a change of heart at the last minute and made the base from 1/2" aluminum plate and the vertical 3/4" upright is made from 1045 steel with a 5/16"-18 thread in the bottom. Initially I was going to go with a steel base and weld the upright to it, but decided I had a better chance of everything staying "true and square" if I bolted the 3/4" diameter upright in place with a 5/16" socket head capscrew. The square bits with the round extension on them are made from some grade of bronze. I'm still using up scraps from that big bronze weight that I reclaimed from the dump. I might finish this thing tomorrow.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              There is far more that I don't know about this mechanism than there are things that I do know. It is a straight 1:1 ratio. Yes, with minimal tweaking there could be two output shafts. I first seen it on a "mechanisms" website, then modelled it in 3D cad and animated it. It appears that it will work, but I will hold my final opinion of this until I see this one running. In all of my 70 years I have never seen a mechanism like this on anything, which leads me to believe that either it doesn't work all that well, or else is too expensive to make compared to miter gears. I am building it more for the "Neat eye candy effect", not as an potential replacement for gears. If it does work well, I'm going to do something a bit different, and drive it with one of my steam engines. I have been so rapped up in i.c. engines for the last few years that my collection of various steam engines have only been holding down shelves in my office. And yes, when I have it working properly, I will post a link to a download of the drawings, for anyone daring enough to build one for themselves.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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