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Help! G0602 problem!

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  • tmarks11
    replied
    Originally posted by Guido View Post
    WOW____talk about law of supply and demand, take a look at the Mcmaster pages, five bucks each for a quarter inch oil cup?
    The OP could buy replacement 7mm press-in ball oilers from Grizzly for $1.25. Of course, they are the same crappy ones that broke the first time around. And I hear it takes months (or longer) to receive them, as they are not a stocked item (which is surprising since they break so often).

    http://www.grizzly.com/parts/p0602004

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Originally posted by Guido View Post
    WOW____talk about law of supply and demand, take a look at the Mcmaster pages, five bucks each for a quarter inch oil cup?

    I find plastic caps, i.e. thread protectors, a dime a pack, fit snugly over anything like an eigth inch tube, and larger. Fit a drilled, turned piece of brass to the oil hole and top off with a plastic cap. Even available in colors.
    I ended up taking air tool nipples and drilling about 7/8 of it .25" leaving a little and pushed mig welder tips down till it stopped the screwed a 3/8 coupling on. For a lid I put beer caps with those small round magnets glued on the underside. Its not exactly press fit but a little dab of clear silicone on the nipples part that holds the balls in the quick coupling holds it fine. Plus not to much of a pain to remove if I needed.

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  • Guido
    replied
    WOW____talk about law of supply and demand, take a look at the Mcmaster pages, five bucks each for a quarter inch oil cup?

    I find plastic caps, i.e. thread protectors, a dime a pack, fit snugly over anything like an eigth inch tube, and larger. Fit a drilled, turned piece of brass to the oil hole and top off with a plastic cap. Even available in colors.

    Leave a comment:


  • tmarks11
    replied
    McMaster Carr has replacements.

    You can either buy the press-in ones that are what you had in there already (although McMaster's look like a better quality), or buy the little press-in oiler cups that provide a little reservoir (halfway down the page, I think you need the press-in vs. threaded version):



    https://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-oil-cups/=157k0up

    Another alternative is that you could get some "drive in grease fittings", and adapt a grease gun as an oil dispenser.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/#grease-fittings/=157k506
    Last edited by tmarks11; 11-26-2016, 01:23 PM.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Great news, glad you got it solved.

    You'll probably be needing one of these to replace damaged one.
    It also might be an idea to change your method of oiling or the oil can itself for oiling them. Once you find an oil can with a spout that fits the ball oilers they aren't so bad. Must have at least twenty or so around the shop on various tools and they haven't been a problem.

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Sucsess!!! I filed the hole a little to remove any big rough stuff then adapted shop vac down to super tiny 2 stroke engine fuel line and shoved down hole and in the other hand I had my air blowing nozzle pushing air up the through the bearing race. I also shot some silikroil in and immediately simultaneously hit the air and ran the vacuum. The old suck and blow combo with a little lube got it.

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  • Willy
    replied
    I suspect the oil channel down to the bearing is probably a rough cast hole rather than a drilled hole. This probably why oil still goes thru past the ball, just hung up in the casting.

    Obviously you can touch it if you tried retrieving it with glue and a welding rod.
    If you have a welder you should be able to tack a rod onto the ball and retrieve it that way. I realize it is a very small ball and you don't have a lot of room to direct the rod directly onto the ball so an insulating sleeve would probably be an asset.

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Arcane has it use vacuum with a small hose spend some time setting it up then yeh-baby ,Alistar

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  • BCRider
    replied
    The sight glass on my lathe screws out. Possibly if you could do that and run a small magnet on a wire down there and IF the ball fell through to the bottom you might be able to pull it out.

    If you don't luck out with finding it I hate to say this but I don't think I'd want to turn on the lathe knowing that ball is in there. Not without knowing how much room there is between the rollers and roller cage in the bearing and if the ball could stir around and fit. So I think you're looking at a strip down unless you manage a miracle and retrieve it.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Is there any way you can stick a very small hose or tube down into the hole and onto the ball and get your mother-in-law over to suck on the end and see it comes out?

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  • Glug
    replied
    If the screw pressed it in, there's the potential that it is really wedged in there vs. merely resisting removal due to surface tension, vacuum, etc. Estimating how deep it was friction fit might be useful to know. If it was forced in over a distance of 1/4", that might change your approach to removal. In that case it seems unlikely air is going to get it out.

    I figure you're going to want to replace that other ball oiler, so removing it now is no great loss. A better understanding of the bore contour might give you an idea how stuck it is, whether there is a risk of losing it in the bearing, etc.

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Well yes I might remove the other and see how big the opening is. Yes I do believe the screw method I used may have contributed to the problem. I will try air, but I think the outer race may be in the way of blowing up from the bottom side of the hole.

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  • Glug
    replied
    Pictures or it never happened.

    Is it possible the screw pressed the ball in, jamming it? Is there a second oiler for another spindle bearing? If so you might remove it. That would allow you to measure the orifice size below the ball, and tell you whether there is a risk of the ball migrating further into the bearing. Assuming they are the same.

    Could you pressurize the bearing to create backpressure? Is there a sight glass? You could possibly remove the sight glass and then use air pressure to blow it out. Or maybe make a temp seal over each side of the bearing and then backflow with air.

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  • Jmay
    replied
    A tad smaller than a bb.

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  • KEJR
    replied
    How big is the ball?

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