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  • Miter Saw Fence

    I have been using this 10” Craftsman miter saw for almost 15 years with no problems but this time when cutting an aluminum angle the angle slipped and broke the fence behind. The fence looks like its paper thin at the crack.

    I was thinking to replace the fence with two pieces of 2”x4” (the 4” flat on the saw surface).

    Any better ideas?

  • #2
    I guess you mean 2" x 4" wood. The fence will be 2" high, or 4" high?

    Could you find a length of aluminum extruded angle, 2x2 or 4x4?

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

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    • #3
      Have you checked with Sears Parts Direct? They probably have the fence in stock.

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      • #4
        Not sure why you would want to use 2x4's. Why not just screw a piece of 3/4" hardwood firmly to both sides of the existing fence with countersunk screws (3-4 per side), and let the saw cut it in half. Better would be something like 1/2" maple, and make it longer than the stock fence, if that works for you.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Joel View Post
          Not sure why you would want to use 2x4's. Why not just screw a piece of 3/4" hardwood firmly to both sides of the existing fence with countersunk screws (3-4 per side), and let the saw cut it in half. Better would be something like 1/2" maple, and make it longer than the stock fence, if that works for you.
          Better yet, get some 1/2 or 3/4" melamine and screw that to the fence. That stuff is usually pretty flat and has a good slippery hard wearing surface that will help your lumber glide through the saw.

          JL..................

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          • #6
            Dense lamination plywood is an excellent choice, which is what most of my fences are made of (all topped with Formica). The good plywood is very stable, which is desirable when the fence must be thinner, like on a fixed blade saw where excessive depth would reduce capacity.
            Thought about suggesting Formica overlay, but the 'slippery' aspect is perhaps not of particular advantage on a miter saw used for aluminum like it is for say, a router table fence. It certainly would wear better and be more durable than bare wood, however.

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            • #7
              Yes I mean 2”x4” wood, 2” high fence. I do have a 4”x4”x1/8” aluminum angle but though the wood is better.

              Don’t want a Sears replacement. It would be expensive with the shipping and in any case I need it now

              The existing fence is bend lightly and can’t be used. I looks good but now is broken I can see it has no thickness and don’t trust it anymore

              Thank you folks

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              • #8
                Finally I used two pcs 2”x2”x1/8” aluminum angle covered with plywood to prevent slipping. I did a few cuts on aluminum and it works well

                However the blade is a 10” carbide tipped with 60 teeth and I noticed 1 tooth is missing. The remaining teeth are like new. Any idea if I should keep using these blade?

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                • #9
                  It's fine. If it's quality blade get new tooth put on when resharpening. About $3 per replacement tooth here.

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                  • #10
                    Good to know, at least I can use the blade until I go for resharpening

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                    • #11
                      Keep in mind that if the new fence face does not match the old fence that you'll be reducing the width of cut you can make with the saw by that much. If you're only using it for cutting aluminium extrusion stock it's not a big deal. But if the day should come where you want to be able to cut a 2x6 or 2x8 you might call yourself a nasty name or two.

                      So that it's a touch more durable a face and resists wear a little better I'd suggest you get either a hardwood or at least use a piece of good dry and well dressed up squared stock 2x3 fir. But maple would be better over the long haul.

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                      • #12
                        I will keep it in mind, thanks for your time

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by oskar270 View Post
                          Finally I used two pcs 2”x2”x1/8” aluminum angle covered with plywood to prevent slipping. I did a few cuts on aluminum and it works well

                          However the blade is a 10” carbide tipped with 60 teeth and I noticed 1 tooth is missing. The remaining teeth are like new. Any idea if I should keep using these blade?
                          Dynamic Saw in Buffalo, NY can repair it. They do excellent work.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Too bad Carl because I’m in Canada

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oskar270 View Post
                              Too bad Carl because I’m in Canada
                              Is the whole tooth missing, or just the carbide tip?

                              If the latter, I'd be surprised if you couldn't find sharpening services in or around Montreal that will braze in a new tip.

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