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OT: Anti-seize on sparkplugs?

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  • OT: Anti-seize on sparkplugs?

    I recently had a spark plug break off in the aluminum head on my 2005 Honda Civic EX and ended up replacing the engine in with a Japanese low mileage one.

    My mechanic said he does not like anti-seize, claiming it does as much harm as good. Being that the plugs now last 100,000 miles (>5 years) he might be right; I have no idea.

    Here are some of my thoughts.

    1. Use anti-seize anyway
    2. Rotate the plugs at the time of oil change
    3. Both 1 & 2

    I would appreciate hearing from those who know more about this than I do.

  • #2
    YES! Anti-seize. Just a dab will do ya. Fire yer mech, he sounds weak in the knowledge base.. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Horst View Post
      I recently had a spark plug break off in the aluminum head on my 2005 Honda Civic EX and ended up replacing the engine in with a Japanese low mileage one.
      what a nightmare - I would have found a way to drill it and then tap oversize and install a heli-coil,,,

      anyways - yeah it's never happened on my watch with engines I maintain - if they do come out first time then they get anti-seized

      My mechanic said he does not like anti-seize, claiming it does as much harm as good. Being that the plugs now last 100,000 miles (>5 years) he might be right; I have no idea.
      what in the world is his reasoning? what's worse than replacing an engine? and "being that the plugs now last 100,000 miles he might be right????""" being now that the plugs last that long is all the more reason to not let them weld themselves to the head over time,,, not picking on you but that makes it even more important to use it,

      I have not installed one spark plug without anti-seize in the past 38 years - and have not pulled threads removing any of the ones iv put in let alone had one break off - so where's the downside to that???

      Here are some of my thoughts.

      1. Use anti-seize anyway
      2. Rotate the plugs at the time of oil change
      3. Both 1 & 2

      I would appreciate hearing from those who know more about this than I do.
      just use the anti-seize and forget about the rest - even at 100,000 miles the plugs will come out like butter....
      Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 12-01-2016, 01:39 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        +2 to the above!

        One other point bares mentioning, NEVER remove a spark plug that has been in an aluminum cylinder head for any length of time when the head is hot. This is especially important if the plugs have never been treated with anti-sieze.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah I agree, anti-seize always. I've done an awful lot of shade-tree mechanic-ing on many cars over the years, and I've always used anti-seize on spark plugs and have never had a problem with stripped threads. I've always bought used cars so have been somewhat at the mercy of previous owners. One old VW I bought was a close call, the first time I went to remove the plugs it felt like a couple of them were going to strip but with some penetrating oil and working them back and forth, they came free without significant thread damage, and were never a problem after that. I also make sure to wire brush the threads if I'm reinstalling old plugs (after gapping them, or doing a compression check, or whatever the reason is).
          Max
          http://joyofprecision.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Willy View Post
            +2 to the above!

            One other point bares mentioning, NEVER remove a spark plug that has been in an aluminum cylinder head for any length of time when the head is hot. This is especially important if the plugs have never been treated with anti-sieze.
            Why not?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Willy View Post
              +2 to the above!

              One other point bares mentioning, NEVER remove a spark plug that has been in an aluminum cylinder head for any length of time when the head is hot. This is especially important if the plugs have never been treated with anti-sieze.

              There is one particular engine where removing them hot with a 3/8" impact gun has worked better than any other way for me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
                Why not?
                The chances of thread seizure is greatest on a hot cylinder head.
                This from the folks at Ford, these people wrote the book on stripped spark plug threads in aluminum heads. Their first recommendation was to have the cylinder head warm but this has now been revised.


                Ford TSB


                CAUTION
                DO NOT REMOVE PLUGS WHEN THE ENGINE
                IS WARM OR HOT. THE ENGINE MUST BE AT
                ROOM TEMPERATURE WHEN PERFORMING
                SPARK PLUG SERVICE. REMOVING THE SPARK
                PLUGS FROM A WARM/HOT ENGINE
                INCREASES THE CHANCE THE THREADS
                COULD BE DAMAGED.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Willy View Post
                  The chances of thread seizure is greatest on a hot cylinder head.
                  This from the folks at Ford, these people wrote the book on stripped spark plug threads in aluminum heads. Their first recommendation was to have the cylinder head warm but this has now been revised.


                  Ford TSB
                  Okay, but does anyone know why it increases the chance of thread damage?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Willy View Post
                    The chances of thread seizure is greatest on a hot cylinder head.
                    This from the folks at Ford, these people wrote the book on stripped spark plug threads in aluminum heads. Their first recommendation was to have the cylinder head warm but this has now been revised.


                    Ford TSB



                    That TSB is crap IMO. And I've done LOTS of those plugs.

                    I take the coil bolts out, then drive down the highway for 10-15 minutes, yank the coils off as soon as I get the truck back in the shop and hit the plugs with a 3/8" impact. It's been way more successful for me that the Ford TSB has been. And I've never wrecked a thread yet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
                      Okay, but does anyone know why it increases the chance of thread damage?
                      I've been told its due to different expansion rates between the steel and aluminum.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The expansion of aluminum is greater than steel and causes the head to grip the plug tighter?
                        Just a guess.
                        Bill
                        I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Willy View Post
                          +2 to the above!

                          One other point bares mentioning, NEVER remove a spark plug that has been in an aluminum cylinder head for any length of time when the head is hot. This is especially important if the plugs have never been treated with anti-sieze.

                          And... don't put a plug into a hot head. It will become way too tight when cold.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kev74 View Post
                            I've been told its due to different expansion rates between the steel and aluminum.
                            Makes no sense to me. Alum. expands twice as much as steel for a given temp change. So, there should be more clearance between the plug and the plug hole when everything is hot.

                            RWO

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've always maintained that Aluminum heads should have stainless thread inserts in the plug bores from the factory,but then I'm funny like that.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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