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Horizontal Milling: I pushed it harder and I'm impressed!

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  • Horizontal Milling: I pushed it harder and I'm impressed!

    Not long ago I posted a video making an overarm support for a Schaublin 13 and my first
    test cut. At the time the consensus seemed to be that I went too easy on it

    I recently came across some arbor spacers that let me use a larger cutter.

    Pushed a 5/8" x 4" 20T stagger tooth cutter, 1" deep through some CRS.
    100 RPM @ a little less than 3/4 IPM.

    By the sounds of it, my little machine didn't even break a sweat.

    If my numbers are right, that cut took a hair over 3/4HP. I think my mill is 2HP.

    I'll be honest, I couldn't image pushing the cutter through that cut at 2 IPM!

    What say ye: should I just keep pushing it harder?
    (and take a few steps back before I hit the lever!)

    I'm in no rush to get anything done, but I'm curious to know what this little thing can do!

    Warning, this video contains a lot of yammering. The horizontal milling happens
    toward the end.. ~ 20mins in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZTUFev08H0


  • #2
    Horizontal mills a re great. Not so versatile, but what they do they do well.

    Yours has a heavy-duty overarm setup, but when pushing the thing, it is good to brace the end of the overarm/arbor support to the knee, which forms a closed system and really makes it stronger with less deflection. Many ways to do it, here is what I did on my much lighter machine.

    The bar at the bottom grips the male dovetail on the knee

    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi,

      There is less concern about bracing with 2 pole mills. They are much, much stiffer than lighter single pole machines.

      Tony, I would think you can double your feed rate to 1 1/2" ipm with that setup in mild steel. It is all about chip load per tooth. Beyond that you may notice some flexing of the arbor shaft itself. (I have bent an arbor shaft by being a bit too enthusiastic back in the day).

      Dalee
      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great video Tony! Yours are always enjoyable.

        As you said, don't climb mill on that machine. It will not end well. That wheel cutter was pretty sharp. A sharp cutter puts way less stress on all machine components.

        Personally, I would not push that mill just to see what it will do. That can cause undue wear & tear. I don't think the cut in the vid. was overdoing it, but pushing the feedrate to double might be a bit much. A horizontal mill is a beast, but everything has a limit.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, he has two, and they resist thrust along the table well. His look to be about 50mm diameter, which is not huge... Might help with the upward forces. Doubling up the bars is less effective than a larger bar, for the vertical

          I find it quiets down the cut, which means less vibration and stress on machine.
          Last edited by J Tiers; 12-01-2016, 06:34 PM.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Take no prisoners.



            Material 3" x 8" mild steel.

            depth of cut 1/2" in one pass.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



            Comment


            • #7
              horizontal mill.....you complete me......







              Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-01-2016, 07:13 PM.
              .

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                Yes, he has two, and they resist thrust along the table well. His look to be about 50mm diameter, which is not huge... Might help with the upward forces.

                I find it quiets down the cut, which means less vibration and stress on machine.
                Hi,

                That skinny little arbor on Tony's mill will get POed long before the overarms. So extra outboard support will add little to dampen vibration on his mill. The single pole your mill has, does benefit from the support. Much like a limp Bridgeport, one skinny support needs a bit of help. And if you give it that extra help, you do reap good benefits as you say.

                Toolguy,
                Personally, I would not push that mill just to see what it will do. That can cause undue wear & tear. I don't think the cut in the vid. was overdoing it, but pushing the feedrate to double might be a bit much. A horizontal mill is a beast, but everything has a limit.
                It's perhaps less about being hard on the machine and more about being hard on the cutter. Running that cutter at too slow of a feed rate will cause extra wear and tear on it. Dulling it before it's time. And that will make the machine work harder. Sometimes we need to make tools work to get the most out of them.

                Now Sir John's Victory is even better yet. The dovetail solid support is very good indeed. I would wager he was taking it a bit easy on the old girl.

                Dalee
                If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nice work. Looks like lathe toolholder blanks. The T slots on a horizontal is impressive!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                    Nice work. Looks like lathe toolholder blanks. The T slots on a horizontal is impressive!
                    lol, well you could do them on the horizontal, T slot cutter held in a collet, but you caught me....I cut the big slot on the horizontal (and everything else) but under cut the T on the vertical. with small amounts of material to remove, the vertical was easier....I keep saying, I use the vertical 80% of the time but remove 80% of the material with the horizontal

                    its the same mill as John's, Elliot/Victoria....but John's is universal, no table swivel on mine

                    and yup, they are tool holders

                    Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-01-2016, 06:54 PM.
                    .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I always enjoy your video's Tony.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        DARN YOU! ! ! !

                        When you mentioned the gauge blocks and working in Imperial then converting and the cross and holy water popped up on the screen I just about spit my rum and eggnog on my monitor. I managed to choke it down and then had to go back and look at the 30 seconds after that part to see what I missed from choking and laughing.

                        You're evil! ! ! ! ..... but in a very nice way.......

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          OK, now that I' more or less over the giggles.....

                          The threading tool is really a sweet score. The ones I've seen previously were a "snail style" Armstrong version where the thread form cutter was on a rapidly reducing radius shape. Yours is circular. So you'll need to keep the center of the form tool somewhat higher than the axis of your part being threaded to obtain the proper clearance angle. But that will be aided by the ability to set the head of the tool to the proper helix angle.

                          All in all a VERY sweet find. I know it might pale in comparison to your stack of arbor spacers. And I gotta say that you REALLY scored big on that one. But that threading tool is still something very much out of the ordinary and quite special.

                          And if you EVERY need to actually use the 10mm broach for a keyway I want to see the shaft and pulley it's used on....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Horizontal cutters do need pushing a bit, provided they are on the right way round, don't ask!. The confusing thing was it still cut!
                            Mighty good video btw, finding stuff in a scrap yard or even finding a scrap yard that will deal with the public is like finding meteor fragments , not impossible but unlikely, it's all scrap cars, finding a set of slips in a scrap yard that are metric, amazing.
                            Mark

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Holy smokes I'm blown away.. John S.. 8"Wx1/2"DOC, I can't even!
                              Mcgyver.. those pics are some real beauts! I actually found some V milling cutters but the tips looked funny (reground?)
                              so I passed on them. Your toolholders make me wish I hadn't, maybe they could've been fixed.

                              BCR: my apologies for the eggnog

                              Mark: most are like that but I've found one or two that buy large material stocks from businesses / factories that have gone belly-up.
                              I think when he bids he must get the whole lot, material, tools, pallet jacks, old shoes, lunch boxes, etc.. whatever was in the place.
                              Doesn't happen often.. as mentioned in the video, I usually go for material cut-offs .. but every now and again in a blue moon..

                              Comment

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