Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

another DRO Cheapie question from OLD ISH Al

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • another DRO Cheapie question from OLD ISH Al

    Please advise what is the best value d r o for a lathe I think x and y are all that's needed *he said in a cheap sort of Scottish voice.* . I cant see me ever using the Z tell me I'm correct please. So What's the Best on market for a smart and Brown 10 24 v s d lathe and a cheapskate owner or skint owner would be more accurate lol .Must be able to purchase in the UK . Under £200.00 if possible for complete kit and no laughing m'lud J S. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    Odd lathe you have there if there is no Z axis.
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

    Comment


    • #3
      Alistair,

      That's a hard one to match with a DRO of any accuracy. If you just want something that will get you within a fraction of a mm, and only the Z axis (carriage travel) you can use one of the igaging style DROS for under $200

      http://www.igagingstore.com/24-Absol...S-p/205481.htm
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

      Comment


      • #4
        I never said no z axis I just don't see the relevance to such a reading being used on a lathe! I can see the left to right and return X axis also forward and back crosslide I.E. facing cuts . But when the tool itself is set permanently at centre height how does one adjust for z axis on a lathe ? I really
        And Dan I want the big Readout one with proper readout box included 2 azis for around shall we say £200 pounds plus a tad. Alistair
        Last edited by Alistair Hosie; 12-05-2016, 05:05 PM.
        Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
          I never said no z axis I just don't see the relevance to such a reading being used on a lathe! I can see the left to right and return X axis also forward and back crosslide I.E. facing cuts . But when the tool itself is set permanently at centre height how does one adjust for z axis on a lathe ? I really
          And Dan I want the big Readout one with proper readout box included 2 azis for around shall we say £200 pounds plus a tad. Alistair
          On a traditional lathe there is 2 axes, which are X and Z, the naming convention is no different than on a mill.
          Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well looking at your original statement I am scratch head confused .I thought I more or less just said that Thanks Jaako anyway
            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't know of any new (unused) DROs with the conventional large (~ 8" x10" ) readout for less than about four hundred dollars. That's about 314.35 pounds.

              If you locate one and get ready to order it, the movement from left to right is the Z axis and the cross slide is the X. (jsut in case there is confusion)


              What kind of accuracy do you need? +-.0002 or +- .0015 inches?
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

              Comment


              • #8
                A DRO on a lathe tends to be a problem because of the diameter/radius multiplication factor of 2. To get an accuracy of +/- 0.001" on the diameter, you need +/- 0.0005" accuracy on the tool travel, and I suspect that you wouldn't be satisfied with +/- 0.001" accuracy on the diameter, so what you REALLY need, as a minimum, is maybe +/- 0.0002" accuracy on the cross slide. Can that be had for 200 pounds, which currently seems to be about $254? Doesn't seem likely.
                ----------
                Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
                  I never said no z axis I just don't see the relevance to such a reading being used on a lathe!
                  think of it this way: z-axis on both a mill and a lathe is represented by a line up through the spindle.

                  X axis on the lathe is the cross slide.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tmarks11 View Post
                    think of it this way: z-axis on both a mill and a lathe is represented by a line up through the spindle.

                    X axis on the lathe is the cross slide.
                    While that may be the "traditional" way of naming the axes it has always seemed counterintuitive to me--much easier to think of "X" as left-right movement of a lathe carriage or mill table and "Y" as front to back of a lathe cross-feed or mill table. "Z" is the vertical movement of the knee on a mill but there's no equivalent movement on a lathe. Also, most 2-axis DROs are only marked "X" and "Y" so it becomes very confusing trying to think of "X" as "Z..."
                    Keith
                    __________________________
                    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The 'convention' makes sense when you are milling in the lathe.
                      Do you need, really need a long distance along the bed? If mostly you are just wanting to measure short shoulders and the like then a regular DTI on a bed stop works and to go digital on that look at a tyre depth gauge, even go upmarket and get a Baty one.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Alistair, if you're OK with a little reduction in accuracy there area some single scale units where the DRO is just a small piece instead of the big panel with all the calculations. And looking on UK Ebay I see a 1meter long version for around 70 pounds.

                        The full on two axis lathe units with the long direction scale being up to a meter long are just under your 200 pound limit.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Regardless what the axis is called, what do you guys normally use the third axis on a lathe DRO for, the compound or the tailstock? I can see a need for each, but think I'd opt for the compound myself.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                            While that may be the "traditional" way of naming the axes it has always seemed counterintuitive to me--much easier to think of "X" as left-right movement of a lathe carriage or mill table and "Y" as front to back of a lathe cross-feed or mill table. "Z" is the vertical movement of the knee on a mill but there's no equivalent movement on a lathe. Also, most 2-axis DROs are only marked "X" and "Y" so it becomes very confusing trying to think of "X" as "Z..."
                            Provided you don't try to use your terminology to communicate with anyone familiar with the industry-wide convention you'll be fine, wrong, but fine ;-)
                            If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
                              Provided you don't try to use your terminology to communicate with anyone familiar with the industry-wide convention you'll be fine, wrong, but fine ;-)
                              That's an interesting point. Earlier today I was talking to a couple guys I know who are machinists and both of them consider the long axis of their machine to be "X". Their experience mirrors mine in that they've had two-axis DROs on machines for a lot of years and, of course, those DROs don't even have a "Z". It's kinda silly to refer to an axis of your machine as "Z" when your DRO says it's "X".

                              To be fair we're talking about conventional manual machines, not CNC. I've taken a couple "introductory" CNC courses and of course a CNC lathe denotes the long axis as "Z" but it also shows it as such on the display. In the 30+ years that I've been running lathes I can't recall any situation where defining the axes has been a critical part of any discussion. In the future if I'm sittin' around talking with "real" machinists I'm sure that "X" and "Y" will serve us just fine but if I'm out in public or on a forum like this I'll make sure I use the "proper" terminology--wouldn't want to confuse the poor button pushers who have never done any real machining...
                              Keith
                              __________________________
                              Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X