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know anything about these? They look neat!

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  • know anything about these? They look neat!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ahknVl9mBDM

    Wonder if one built on a larger scale would still work as efficiently?

  • #2
    Oh great, another project.
    Thanks!
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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    • #3
      I don't see why not but wow talk about snowballing effect - would prefer an adjustable orifice on the fuel side to tone it down to whatever level, just adjusting his intake air vents is really not the way to go as if it's actually reducing the flame it then means its wasting fuel and increasing un-burnt hydrocarbons.

      kinda reminds me of those little hand warmers I had as a kid - fill them with lighter fluid and they just had a wicking action that kept this little heat filament glowing red hot - had a lid like a lighter but with vents - then had a cloth sac to put them in, very handy for being outside in the cold and would last all day long...
      Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 12-11-2016, 11:01 AM.

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      • #4
        Bigger container with more burners would by my bet.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Copper Coil Burner/Stove - DIY is thread subject

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          • #6
            It looks as if these burners could have a "runaway" problem, where the heating evaporates fuel faster than vapor can escape through the holes, which could lead to an uncontrolled pressure buildup situation and potentially a container failure where it pops open and causes a fire. If the pressure is that high, it might boil into vapor as soon as pressure is released, and there could be a considerable ball of flame.

            Possibly the wick feed helps to control that. And, perhaps the higher pressure might just lead to more fuel vapor exiting. But then, that would heat the area more. And with his slip-on flame tube, that will get hot also, and is directly touching the fuel container also. I do not think I like the exact design he has made.

            I would have expected just a little more distance between the fuel reservoir and the coil, so that the coil cannot overheat the container. The old "roarer" burners for model ship boilers had usually at least 5x more distance, and also might have some sort of heat dissipator on the pipe.
            Last edited by J Tiers; 12-11-2016, 03:42 PM.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #7
              I wonder if you could heat lug nuts with that to wick some candle wax in.


              I see one other build on thetube that used a glass container.

              I'll add this one to my list as well for builds. Right after I get my slip roller done.
              Andy

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              • #8
                Where have you guys been? These burners have been around for decades, century even. No different from the petrol blowlamps our fathers used. Only the expensive ones had needle jets and safety valves.

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                • #9
                  I saw one these some where a few month back and built one, I keep forgetting to buy some alcohol to try it out.. just needed something to build. The one I built has a bigger fuel tank. There is the possibility they would make a good backpack stove when hiking. Mine will probably never get used because I have no use for one and I would be afraid to give it to someone because of liability issues.
                  Last edited by lugnut; 12-12-2016, 03:06 PM. Reason: added wording
                  _____________________________________________

                  I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.

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                  • #10
                    Am I thinking of something else or did not the old coleman cook stoves run one of their main burner feed lines directly through the burner zone? you pump the gas tank initially and then it kind of produces it's own pressure while ensuring the gas gets vaporized before going out the burner ----------- ?

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                    • #11
                      This is no different as far as the basics go than the old Coleman stoves too. The only issue I see here is the lack of an over pressure valve.

                      It's still pretty neat though. I'd not seen this coil and alky version before.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        It looks as if these burners could have a "runaway" problem, where the heating evaporates fuel faster than vapor can escape through the holes, which could lead to an uncontrolled pressure buildup situation and potentially a container failure where it pops open and causes a fire. If the pressure is that high, it might boil into vapor as soon as pressure is released, and there could be a considerable ball of flame.

                        Possibly the wick feed helps to control that. And, perhaps the higher pressure might just lead to more fuel vapor exiting. But then, that would heat the area more. And with his slip-on flame tube, that will get hot also, and is directly touching the fuel container also. I do not think I like the exact design he has made.

                        I would have expected just a little more distance between the fuel reservoir and the coil, so that the coil cannot overheat the container. The old "roarer" burners for model ship boilers had usually at least 5x more distance, and also might have some sort of heat dissipator on the pipe.
                        I agree it seems it could get bad quick if things went wrong. I think I would like to attempt one maybe 3 times larger. My only hang up is how could I make it safe without over complicating it? Any ideas?

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                        • #13
                          first and foremost use some kind of metering/shut off for the fuel side - don't just allow pressure to run amuck with heat -guaranteed snowballing effect.

                          with this there really would be no need to create a pressure pop-off valve ---- something I would consider very dangerous in itself unless the venting is carried quite a distance...


                          last but not least - keep in mind it's very easy to create super strong "small" pressure structures but as the size goes up the task becomes monumental --- all the more reason to have control over the units fuel output as then you can control your pressure properly
                          Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 12-12-2016, 05:42 PM.

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                          • #14
                            You guys are always so 'what if' about everything. You can 'what if' yourself into doing nothing! I suspect (but don't know) that the pressure in this device will be self-limiting, especially considering the reservoir volume/orifice size (large) ratio. No runaway. I know, on youtube it It sounds like its really blowing, but alcohol is hard to keep lit at any significant velocity without a controlled mixer and yet the flame seems relatively stable. Besides, you can only 'wick' at a certain rate which may well decline as the vapor pressure builds.

                            One of you guys with a lot of free time could build the bottle version and add a pressure ga. just to see what happens. I would, if I had that much time.
                            Last edited by chipmaker4130; 12-12-2016, 06:07 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Also similar to the old plumbers furnace that was used to melt lead ... back in the lead & oakum pipe sealing days. Those units ran off gasoline (what was referred to white gas at the time ... basically no-lead today). Had a large coil to heat and help atomize the gas. Did have a needle valve on the supply. You did have to pump these up (like the old Colemans).

                              I used to have one of a little different design (more like the old blow torch) worked great. I just recently bought a lot of babbitt tools that had one of the old coil models. Still too chicken to fire it up.

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