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OT Just get out & fix it!

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  • OT Just get out & fix it!

    http://imgur.com/gallery/qE5rlFN

    I'm sure many have seen it as it an old pic of a Cub but very close to my '38 Taylorcraft with the exposed cylinders, etc. He's not propping as stated as he's just push the nose down. I think he was working on a mag.
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  • #2
    I loved the first comment that someone had made!

    Here's his twin brother, out for a ride on his bike: http://thevintagent.blogspot.nl/2011...incent-at.html

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

    Comment


    • #3
      yeah though you just through it in a nose dive for that ---- at any rate the guy does have a set no matter what he's trying to do...

      Comment


      • #4
        Who took the pic? ... passenger with the only chute?

        Comment


        • #5
          I've seen this pic a long time ago. A cub IMHO is a PITA as if you fly solo you have to fly from the back seat & taildraggers are hard to taxi anyway so I've often wondered if someone is in the back seat we can't see.
          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
          country, in easy stages."
          ~ James Madison

          Comment


          • #6
            I wonder how many seat belt extenders you need to snap together to do that? Or is there an OSHA rule that lets you use alternative PPE?
            .
            "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is some more info on the photo.

              http://www.j3-cub.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21116

              Dwight

              Comment


              • #8
                Without someone in the back seat, it would already be seriously nose down.
                Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ever hear of the Flying Keys?

                  http://fly.historicwings.com/2013/06/the-flying-keys/

                  https://airandspace.si.edu/collectio...bin-j-1-deluxe
                  Last edited by wierdscience; 12-14-2016, 02:00 AM.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Two brothers in a 1938 Tcraft tried to fly non stop for 30 days without landing. Fuel, oil, food & water were picked up by a rope & hook from a pickup driving down the runway. I don't even want to know about the bathroom thing. They were put down by a Thunderstorm after 14 days of non-stop flying. Same year in another 1938 Tcraft set the float plane record from New York to Miami by filling the floats with fuel. Boy those were the days!
                    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                    country, in easy stages."
                    ~ James Madison

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've done stupid things in small airplanes, and because of this, I am perplexed as to why the prop is not wind-milling unless he purposely flew slow enough, just about a stall to get it to stop. Either case, nosing over and picking up enough airspeed should do the trick. Back to Flylo's comment about the magneto, makes more sense.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                        I am perplexed as to why the prop is not wind-milling unless he purposely flew slow enough, just about a stall to get it to stop.
                        Plane had a ceiling of 35,000ft and due to it only being normally aspirated he had an 18:1 comprendo ratio to help make up for it, not good when you stall at close to sea level...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flylo View Post
                          Two brothers in a 1938 Tcraft tried to fly non stop for 30 days without landing. Fuel, oil, food & water were picked up by a rope & hook from a pickup driving down the runway. I don't even want to know about the bathroom thing. They were put down by a Thunderstorm after 14 days of non-stop flying. Same year in another 1938 Tcraft set the float plane record from New York to Miami by filling the floats with fuel. Boy those were the days!
                          Ya,but just think about adjusting the valve lash on a radial while in flight
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                            Ya,but just think about adjusting the valve lash on a radial while in flight
                            Obviously not the same sort of aircraft, but some of the large flying boats had access to the rear of the engines from inside the nacelle, complete with catwalks etc for getting there through the wing, which was quite thick. No idea what could be done from the position, but the carburetors and intake air heaters were typically back there. Obviously potentially better than NO access.

                            When landed, access was still that way, with doors and fold down platforms for getting out of the nacelle, accessing the engine from the side to remove cowlings and obtain full access. Hard to put a stepladder in the bay to do maintenance.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 12-15-2016, 02:00 AM.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                              Plane had a ceiling of 35,000ft and due to it only being normally aspirated he had an 18:1 comprendo ratio to help make up for it, not good when you stall at close to sea level...
                              Never make much over 10,000 ft & about a 6.5 comp ratio. Duane Cole used to land on the roof of a station wagon, the shortest airport. Here's someone doing it many years later https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gWrh6wpVyo
                              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                              country, in easy stages."
                              ~ James Madison

                              Comment

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