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Millrite MVN quill feed slop z axis

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  • Millrite MVN quill feed slop z axis

    Anyone have experience with above machine with the factory z axis power feed? When using the hand wheel, there is a good 1/3 rd rotation before the quill moves.. less than ideal to say the least.

    The head is currently disassembled. This machine uses a nut and screw not a rack. I discovered the z axis nut attachment bolts were loose, so obviously there was slop there, the nut not being tight to the quill.

    I am wondering if anyone has any first hand experience with wear in these units. Even though tightening the mounting bolts will help, I am kicking around the idea of getting a new nut anyways.. guessing this would be the part most worn, esp if it's been getting canted up/down by the screw due to loose bolts. Ideas?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Try the screw and nut together by hand while it's apart. You may want a new nut and screw, or a new screw and Delrin nut, etc. I am not familiar with this machine in all the details, only the whole machine in general.

    Comment


    • #3
      The handwheel has a geared setup to rotate the screw as the handwheel is horizontal shaft. Therefore the slop may be in the nut/screw OR it may be at least partially in the gearing. There could even be a loose gear, that has slop due to the gear slipping on the shaft before the setscrew "takes up".

      Look at all the parts before deciding.

      I assume you have a manual, but

      http://neme-s.org/Shaper%20Books/millrite-manual1.pdf
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        The handwheel has a geared setup to rotate the screw as the handwheel is horizontal shaft. Therefore the slop may be in the nut/screw OR it may be at least partially in the gearing. There could even be a loose gear, that has slop due to the gear slipping on the shaft before the setscrew "takes up".

        Look at all the parts before deciding.

        I assume you have a manual, but

        http://neme-s.org/Shaper%20Books/millrite-manual1.pdf

        Yeah, got it thanks. Trying to avoid assembly, disassembly, reassembly if possible, but that may be the boat I'm in. There's no great way to see how it all works other than full assembly. All the gears were secure.

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        • #5
          Forgot to mention that if the nut can slop around at all, that adds up also.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Mine is a Powermatic model, but should be similar. I had a bit of slop too. The nut on mine is split so it can be tightened down and that helped a little, but most of the slop turned out to be axial movement of the screw. A socket head screw and lock nut are used to adjust the axial play and are easily accessed at the bottom of the screw.

            Iv'e thought about facing the handle mount face in order to tighten up the bevel gears a bit, but it's in the "good enough" range now.
            George

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
              Mine is a Powermatic model, but should be similar. I had a bit of slop too. The nut on mine is split so it can be tightened down and that helped a little, but most of the slop turned out to be axial movement of the screw. A socket head screw and lock nut are used to adjust the axial play and are easily accessed at the bottom of the screw.

              Iv'e thought about facing the handle mount face in order to tighten up the bevel gears a bit, but it's in the "good enough" range now.

              That sounds quite different than mine. Nut is not split (wish it where) and manual mentions a split nut only on table nut (x axis).

              Comment


              • #8
                "Slop" ("back-lash?") can be either or both axial or radial or parts of both.

                I would not worry about the "axial" so long as it works (same as lathe/mill lead-screws and nuts" but radial (diametric if you like) can be a PITA as the quill "movers" (radially) which can usually be remedied by clamping the quill tight enough to reduced the "wobble" as much as is needed but still to have the quill axial movement satisfactory.

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                • #9
                  This is axial.

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                  • #10
                    Tif, when I said axial, I meant the screw the nut rides on was moving - too much end play.
                    George

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                    • #11
                      The old "backlash debate" !!!

                      One half say "it's no problem, man up and get used to it".

                      The other half say "it's a nuisance and can be confusing, I want to fix it"

                      The third half says "check for loose things, no sense putting up with more than you have to."

                      I kinda like what that third half says.......
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you really want those the effects of radial clearances - try using a boring-head and watch for the "wobble" of the quill in its bore.

                        It can be anywhere between a small PITA and a bigger one.

                        I clamp the quill on my mill-drills and use the mill head down-feed - on a vertical mill I'd power or hand-feed the knee.

                        Much better results.

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                        • #13
                          I have never seen the factory powerfeed Z. A pic or two sometime would be great.
                          John Titor, when are you.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
                            I have never seen the factory powerfeed Z. A pic or two sometime would be great.

                            Most difficult part of Millrite rebuild... remembering Photobucket password. Once I get it degumed I'll try for some pics.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Don't know if you have this .. but ... if it helps

                              John Titor, when are you.

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