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long-term rust protection of bare metal

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  • long-term rust protection of bare metal

    Included with my '32 Coupe are several pieces of sheetmetal, presumably repro parts. There's a RF fender, pair of running boards, a floor pan for the rumble seat area, and the shroud that goes beneath the radiator and wraps around the front inside of the springs, plus a spare tire "well" or pocket that goes in a front fender. This is all bare, unpainted steel, and I have no immediate plans to install the stuff.

    How best to protect it? I'm thinking of spraying it with a light-weight oil of some sort. (ATF?, motor oil?) Everything will be stored inside, but not in a heated area. This protection might have to last 10 or more years.

  • #2
    Maybe think about priming it. You will end up re-priming later, but for now it would be a full coating that won't evaporate or wipe off on things.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      Nothing you are going to wipe on those is going to last 10 years plus you are going to chemically contaminate a surface that you want to paint.

      Take them down to a body shop and have them paint with whatever color they are doing that day.

      Steve

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      • #4
        Originally posted by darryl View Post
        Maybe think about priming it. You will end up re-priming later, but for now it would be a full coating that won't evaporate or wipe off on things.

        Primer doesn't stop rust. Common misconception.
        John Titor, when are you.

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        • #5
          LPS3
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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          • #6
            LPS3.

            Or if you have trouble finding it locally then look in the motor cycle shops for some chain wax.

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            • #7
              LPS3

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
                Primer doesn't stop rust. Common misconception.
                Every once in a while I'll see a car being driven around with a coat of primer on it and feeling sad knowing the really hard lesson that the car's owner is going to get about why you don't do that.

                Steve

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                • #9
                  to keep my saw blades from rusting I use mothers wax. works on the hand saws and the buzz saw that goes on the back of the tractor.

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                  • #10
                    Phosphoric acid rust converter?
                    Mark

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                    • #11
                      If you really have no plans for these parts for 10 years, just roll on a quick, thin coat of exterior latex paint. I would feel better stripping that and painting over the panel rather than putting oil or other rust preventative on it.

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                      • #12
                        Jim--Don't put oil or wax on the body parts. It will cause unbelievable problems when you do finally get to painting them. Spray them with a catalyzed epoxy primer. Old style laquer based primer won't stop moisture from rusting the parts but the newer catalyzed epoxy will protect them long term.---Brian
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          Thanks, fellas!

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, that's what I meant- epoxy catalyzed primer. ha ha- I didn't realize that ordinary primer would not be a barrier to moisture in an inside environment. I've seen cars with only primer running around for years, but never thought to check for rust formation.

                            You might be better off just spray painting yourself using a combination primer/paint. Color won't matter. You'll be sanding it away later anyway, so you don't want too good of a coating- consumer grade spray paint might be just good enough.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              Epoxy primer is great stuff and the first thing I do to any body panel or repair is to spray it with epoxy primer, the stuff is expen$ive but it can't be beat for corrosion protection! A couple of tips for using this type of primer, it needs a rather rough surface to adhere properly so I scuff the bare metal with 180 grit paper and then apply two coats allowing it to become dry to touch before applying the second coat. If a finish is not applied within a day or so, this varies with brands, it will need to be scuffed with sandpaper and another coat applied before any topcoating is applied including conventional primers. If left for any length of time, certainly years, it should be topcoated with another primer such as lacquer or one of the polyester filler primers within a couple of hours, no scuffing needed if coated in that time frame. If left for weeks, never mind years, it becomes EXTREMELY hard making it very difficult to sand and causes difficulty in getting topcoats to adhere. If something like even simple lacquer primer is applied around two hours after the original application it will adhere quite well and is then easily prepped for painting even after being left for long periods of time, old uncoated epoxy primer however is a absolute nightmare to properly prep for finish painting!

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