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1000 Hour Clock build in 12 minutes!

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  • 1000 Hour Clock build in 12 minutes!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU7iKNmQBIs&app=desktop

  • #2
    That is the most awesome thing I've seen in quite a while! Thanks for sharing!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      I watched that the other day too after seeing the post on clicksping's upcoming antikythera mechanism. Beautiful and educational, the editing is superb.

      What is happening at 11:19?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Swarfer View Post
        I watched that the other day too after seeing the post on clicksping's upcoming antikythera mechanism. Beautiful and educational, the editing is superb.

        What is happening at 11:19?
        Heat-bluing a steel screw. The workpiece is resting on a bed of heated brass chips.
        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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        • #5
          Cheers

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          • #6
            He's made 2 of the bluing trays if memory serves. This is a video he did on making one.

            -Dan S.
            dans-hobbies.com

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            • #7
              I heard him describe himself as an "amateur clockmaker" amateur my ass!
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                There are a potful of interesting techniques illustrated in passing in that video.

                I wish bluing I do would turn out like that......
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  There are a potful of interesting techniques illustrated in passing in that video.

                  I wish bluing I do would turn out like that......
                  Definitely! His videos are full of great techniques that are often overlooked outside of horology. All of the footage in the video flylo linked to is from his in-depth video series on making the clock, and he typically describes and shows things in very helpful detail in those videos.

                  Getting that perfect deep, consistent blue when tempering is much easier said than done. In theory it's not difficult, but in practice it is even heat distribution, cleanliness, and patience that are usually problem areas (at least, that has been my experience).

                  I don't want to take this thread off in a different direction, but if there's interest in some (hopefully helpful) tips and techniques for cosmetic heat bluing, I'd be happy to do some kind of writeup and maybe video about it to share some of the things that have helped me.
                  Max
                  http://joyofprecision.com/

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                  • #10
                    A good part of the success of his heat treating for the blue is the work is does prior to - the polishing. That and the brass chips to act as a sort of heat sink to even everything out

                    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                    I heard him describe himself as an "amateur clockmaker" amateur my ass!
                    Amateur means he doesn't get paid for it.....I don't think saying he's an amateur suggests anything about his skill level.
                    Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-21-2016, 12:57 PM.
                    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mars-red View Post
                      Definitely! His videos are full of great techniques that are often overlooked outside of horology. All of the footage in the video flylo linked to is from his in-depth video series on making the clock, and he typically describes and shows things in very helpful detail in those videos.

                      Getting that perfect deep, consistent blue when tempering is much easier said than done. In theory it's not difficult, but in practice it is even heat distribution, cleanliness, and patience that are usually problem areas (at least, that has been my experience).

                      I don't want to take this thread off in a different direction, but if there's interest in some (hopefully helpful) tips and techniques for cosmetic heat bluing, I'd be happy to do some kind of writeup and maybe video about it to share some of the things that have helped me.
                      yes, please do
                      Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fastfire View Post
                        yes, please do
                        ditto
                        san jose, ca. usa

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Mcgyver;1087172...

                          Amateur means he doesn't get paid for it.....I don't think saying he's an amateur suggests anything about his skill level.[/QUOTE]

                          Agree.

                          That does not mean that folks do not use the term to mean "unskilled", "poor craftsman", and so forth. They definitely DO.

                          As far as some are concerned, if the top toolmaker in a good shop goes home and makes something in his personal shop, down the middle of the tolerances, and with a top quality finish, on the same type, and maybe even same make and model machines, it is "home-made", i.e. "low grade", "poorly made", "make-shift", etc, etc.

                          But if the about-to-be-fired slowest low grade hack of an apprentice in the shop makes one of the same items at work, at (or over) the limit of tolerances, and with a horrible finish, THAT is a perfectly normal commercial quality item.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 12-21-2016, 03:35 PM.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What kind of blade is in the scroll saw?
                            Gary Davison
                            Tarkio, Mo.

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                            • #15
                              WOW!
                              Just about everything except mining the ore and smelting the metal.
                              I'm going to go hide in my shop.
                              Bill
                              I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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