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OT, How does this fan work? Any ideas?

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  • OT, How does this fan work? Any ideas?

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pro..._vc=IOPDP2OWOW

    It states that it starts turning at 212 deg. wondering if I could make one...
    Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

  • #2
    Don't know - not a sterling engine because they specifically state it produces it's own electricity so if it was sterling you would just go direct drive,,, thermocouple type technology?

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    • #3
      It mentions electric, so I'd say a thermoelectric module of some sort and a small motor. Bet it don't move much air.

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      • #4
        Wait a minute - look at the temp specs at when it starts producing power --- 212F ring a bell?

        fill it half with water and off you go with steam???

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        • #5
          It's a thermoelectric module. Similar to the thermoelectric coolers used to cool computer cpu's but run in reverse. Heat difference between the stove side ant that heatsink thing on the top generates a voltage the runs the fan.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            yup thermocouple - two different metals that create electricity with temperature variance.

            I thought that originally but then those starting temp specs made me second guess it yet if they were creating pressure why go electric instead of just direct drive so did not make sense.

            but come to think of it - steam power would be ideal as it would add humidity into the house while heating...

            two tiny jets at the props ends would get the job done no real moving parts but the fan ahhhh but the noise thing - damn... lol
            Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 12-22-2016, 09:49 PM.

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            • #7
              Thermocouple.

              These have been kicking about here for quite a few years, quite effective.
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #8
                http://www.ecofan.ie/?page_id=13

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                • #9
                  I have one
                  They work really well when put on something like a wood burning stove

                  Sandwiched between the top fins and the body where the fan and motor are is a peltier device. Like a thermocouple, it generates a voltage across a temperature difference but I think (am not sure) that the physics are somewhat different. As someone said, they are Also used as CPU coolers.

                  Frank

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                  • #10
                    I have some thermoelectric modules that I was going to use on my woodstove. I think they are 100 watts at 12 VDC. I used one to repair a B&D solid state refrigerator a while ago. I haven't tried them in reverse mode, but they should work pretty well on the woodstove. It is important to maintain as high a differential temperature as possible, so the fan should blow cold air from the room over the cold plate, while the hot plate should have good contact with the stove surface. It might even be helpful to rig up a small hydronic system with a small pump and heat exchanger coils, perhaps scrounged from a scrapped high end gaming computer.
                    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                    USA Maryland 21030

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                    • #11
                      As said a thermocouple, hot junction cold junction array ,version I read about was a peltier cooler type according to the write up, there were a few DIY jobs on YouTube
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        Those common Peltier devices DO have a max temperature. I forget what it is, but I think it is relatively low. Woodstoves can get VERY hot on top.

                        They mention 650 deg, but obviously the thermal path is high enough thermal resistance that it will not be close to 650 up where the works are. The motor surely cannot tolerate close to 650, and it is in between.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          Up in my area , there are lots of these fans. Many burn wood here for heat, and yes they do move air around.

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                          • #14
                            Technically it's not a Peltier device, but a Seebeck device when producing an electrical output from a temperature differential.
                            Paul Compton
                            www.morini-mania.co.uk
                            http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
                              Up in my area , there are lots of these fans. Many burn wood here for heat, and yes they do move air around.
                              I think Ideally this would be best utilized on double wall wood stoves like the one I have - mind has to run a blower, always a concern for if there's a power outage - stove will still keep the pipes from freezing but the inner box might overheat too.

                              if a device like this was built into the stove it would be ideal because you would have the best of both words to power it - a hot inner box and just a few inches away a cool outer - plus vast amounts of surface area to play with and make all kinds of gains, make them so they can be unbolted and serviced or replaced - - high temp silicone wiring runs down to the front of the stove to power the fans intake systems so motors don't overheat... what's not to luv? maybe the price tag some but now you have a truly great working concept...

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