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Chuck Jaw Covers - Improvements?

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  • Chuck Jaw Covers - Improvements?

    I whipped these up today after seeing Tom Lipton's blog post about them;

    http://oxtool.blogspot.ca/2013/01/fo...ft-covers.html

    His is a four-jaw, but I did it up for my 3-jaw for holding softer parts.



    Chucked up some 1/2" drill rod tight to check runout, with the covers I got 8.5 thou and without covers I got 1.1 thou. Poo.

    Not sure what I can do to make them better? Not really sure why they're so off either, since I figured this would be a best case by tightening it down on a hard rod to try and press out any irregularity in the bends or any gaps between the cover and the contact face of the jaws.

    Maybe Tom's 4 jaw is a key requirement to solve the issues.

    Anyone have any tips for how to get better performing jaw covers?

  • #2
    maybe use a brake to put real bends near the faces, so the cover will have a flat surface for each face instead of that curve (as the curve will be slightly different for each one, and may or may not wind up pressing flat against each chuck)?

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    • #3
      Did you first bend those before putting anything between the jaws? If youu did, then the material & bends are fighting back and it doesn't want to conform to the rod & jaws anymore. What you want to do is grip a (hard) rod with just one piece, bend it and then repeat for all the jaws & shims. After that you get it better to conform to the jaws working surfaces.

      Tight is also a bit subjective thing, and as that ooks like a cheap chuck, does it move the jaws with just fingertips on the chuck key, or does it require actually tight turning to get them to move? If it requires, then you can't feel the tightness of the jaw grip as you are fighting your chuck.
      Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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      • #4
        I formed them in a vise the way Tom Lipton showed but I didn't have a suitable piece of rod to press into so I pushed them against the vise face flat.

        I figured when I gripped some rod firmly in the lathe it would help push in that bit at the contact point and get a curve there, at least under that force.

        The chuck is cheap but can turn with one finger, if you can keep the key from wobbling out of the socket.

        Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          I did the same thing a few years ago just using sections of PVC pipe and found the wall thickness was so variable as to be worthless. :-) This looks to be OK if the chuck and material are OK. Of course the 4 jaw will obviate those problems.
          ...lew...

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          • #6
            Material too thick to conform.
            Len

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            • #7
              Take them off and anneal them on the inside section...heat to almost red hot and air cool...then when you put them back on, they should bend and conform better to the jaws.
              David Kaiser
              “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
              ― Robert A. Heinlein

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 38_Cal View Post
                Take them off and anneal them on the inside section...heat to almost red hot and air cool...then when you put them back on, they should bend and conform better to the jaws.
                Thanks I'll try that out.

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                • #9
                  You can also take out the jaw's and use a small hammer to form them around each jaw like a metal forming buck. I think the annealing will be the easiest though.

                  TX
                  Mr fixit for the family
                  Chris.

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                  • #10
                    A piece of masking tape on each jaw is all I ever use. Works for me.
                    Kansas City area

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                      A piece of masking tape on each jaw is all I ever use. Works for me.
                      Or a strip of abrasive cloth around the work piece or a strip of aluminum from a beverage can.

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                      • #12
                        Annealing did the trick, quench in water got the brass real soft. Hard grip on some steel got it properly formed.

                        Indicates well. Good ideas with the pop can and masking tape.






                        Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk

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                        • #13
                          mark them so they go back on the same jaws next time.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                            mark them so they go back on the same jaws next time.
                            Smart

                            Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk

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