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Best inserts for finishing gummy 1018?

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  • lalatheman
    replied
    Ref Post 28 ......

    SUMITOMO DCGT 070202R-FX T2000Z 10 of em in a pack $37 + $7.99 that looks good to me !

    Has anyone figured out how to use the Sumitomo catalog ? The only version I have found is based on Adobe Flash, although it might be better , for me , even after down loading the latest version of flash, its touchy and unstable and I can't yet print pages.....?

    Thanks
    Dave Lawrence
    Last edited by lalatheman; 03-02-2017, 01:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    For those who have more money to burn these would be interesting to try:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/WENDEPLATTEN...gAAOSwnQhXoHM6

    Leave a comment:


  • Yondering
    replied
    Any tool holder specified for the more common DCMT inserts works with DCGT as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • lalatheman
    replied
    What kind of toolholder would be used with DCGT insert ?

    So far the SDJC holder looks like it might work, but have not yet fond any thing specifically speced fot this insert.....

    Also thinking with the light cutting pressures involved here , a simple shop made clamp might be satisfactory.....

    Thanks
    Dave Lawrence

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by lalatheman View Post
    Did you round or break the edge , where the two highly polished surfaces come together ?

    Thanks
    Dave Lawrence
    No, I left it razor sharp* after grinding and polishing and it seem to hold up reasonably well, much better than I actually ever expected.

    *83-degree blunt edge is hardly comparable to razor, but it gives you idea of the finish and sharpness. Under good lightning and bare eye it looks like very sharp knife blade, ie. absolutely no visible reflections of the corner.
    I have reasonably nice USB microscope and tried to take the ceramic insert under microscope to compare with something like HSS blade or carbide but my usb microscope or drivers decided to give quits with the windows.

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  • lalatheman
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    Same Kennametal KY1615 ceramic insert sharpened with 0 degree relief and 7 degree rake angle, both surfaces now lapped close to mirror polish with 600grit +5 + 1 micron diamond lapping compoud.
    Did you round or break the edge , where the two highly polished surfaces come together ?

    Thanks
    Dave Lawrence

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    I ground a threading tool out of Stellite. Only a 1/4in bit but holy cow it took a long time. I wish I had had a coarser wheel than the 100grit white wheel on my grinder.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    not clear what you were doing. carbide or hss? what geometry? you know, you can get the diameter down without cutting. the tool just burnishes the work.
    Same Kennametal KY1615 ceramic insert sharpened with 0 degree relief and 7 degree rake angle, both surfaces now lapped close to mirror polish with 600grit +5 + 1 micron diamond lapping compoud.

    Leave a comment:


  • dian
    replied
    not clear what you were doing. carbide or hss? what geometry? you know, you can get the diameter down without cutting. the tool just burnishes the work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaakko Fagerlund
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    So I decided to head in to the "you must be full-of-sh*t tenths category" and see what is the minimum DOC I can get.
    0,001 mm digital dial gauge set to cross slide and afterwards measured with 0,001mm digi-mike:

    DOC measured with the dial gauge:
    0,010 mm DOC, actual diameter from 14,717 to 14,700
    0,005 mm DOC, actual diameter from 14,701 to 14,695 (still cutting actual chips, albeit almost invisible)

    Looks like there is 0,003 to 0,004 mm error on measured diameter vs. measured DOC. Or abouts one and half "tenths"
    Or it could be measurement errors piling up.
    Whatever the actual measurements, you can positively say that it can take less than you need

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    So I decided to head in to the "you must be full-of-sh*t tenths category" and see what is the minimum DOC I can get.
    0,001 mm digital dial gauge set to cross slide and afterwards measured with 0,001mm digi-mike:

    DOC measured with the dial gauge:
    0,010 mm DOC, actual diameter from 14,717 to 14,700
    0,005 mm DOC, actual diameter from 14,701 to 14,695 (still cutting actual chips, albeit almost invisible)

    Looks like there is 0,003 to 0,004 mm error on measured diameter vs. measured DOC. Or abouts one and half "tenths"
    Or it could be measurement errors piling up.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Hah........... nice, thank you.

    I may have some of the notched cutters, so I will be checking with my pocket magnet, you bet...!

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    Never heard of this stuff before but based on the description I found seems promising. Does it require special grinding wheels to sharpen?

    Tantung Description

    Can be used on machines where speeds and rigidity are limited. With tantung tools, older machines can handle increased production loads and help reduce costs. Performs interrupted cuts significantly better than carbides.
    Afaik can be sharpened just like HSS but just takes more time. And maybe you could also use diamond wheels since it doesn't contain iron like HSS. "Only" problem is very limited availability and high price. I belive in europe these alloys are more commonly referred as "stellite"

    http://conradhoffman.com/stellite.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
    For those wanting a HSS type cutting tool that holds an edge longer, try Tantung. One note of caution, when grinding, don't quench at all, only air cool. This is one of the things they used before carbide was widely available.
    Never heard of this stuff before but based on the description I found seems promising. Does it require special grinding wheels to sharpen?

    Tantung Description

    Can be used on machines where speeds and rigidity are limited. With tantung tools, older machines can handle increased production loads and help reduce costs. Performs interrupted cuts significantly better than carbides.

    Leave a comment:


  • Toolguy
    replied
    For those wanting a HSS type cutting tool that holds an edge longer, try Tantung. One note of caution, when grinding, don't quench at all, only air cool. This is one of the things they used before carbide was widely available.

    Leave a comment:

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