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Gate design help please

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  • Gate design help please

    My next project is to build a new gate. I will give you some info gate opening is 16'
    height of fence boards 6' type of wood is cedar 1"x6'. I would like to build one gate to span the opening. In the picture below I have 3 gates 1 gate is a walk through and the other two open to make an 11' opening. I did not build this original set up that is my disclaimer.

    I would like to put in a metal post 6"x6" x .250 " square tubing in the ground 4' deep concreted in place with rebar. This will be the post the gate will hinge on. I am going to make grease able pins to hinge the gate on. I will put 2"x4" wood stringers on the outside of the gate to attach the cedar boards to. The frame of this gate is to be made of steel. My question is what size material should I use to make the frame out of. I don't want it to be heavier than necessary but I don't want it too bow either. I am thinking of using square or rectangular tubing. I have a mig welder to build the gate with.

    I am having a hard time getting in and out of the 11' opening with my motor home and boat, due to the shape of the driveway not shown in the picture. I would like the gate to open very easy as it will also be my walk through gate.


  • #2
    I made a 20' gate. I used 2" square tubing, .064 wall. At about 14' from the hinge, I have a wheel that pivots on a truck spring. The asphalt is a little rough. I can level the gate by a bolt pushing on the spring.

    I used two old truck throwout bearings in the hinges. I bolted 2 by 4's on the sq tubing for the fence boards to attach to.

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    • #3
      How about mount a small wheel at the swinging end of the gate. This way you don't have to make the door too rigid and it will be lighter.

      Comment


      • #4
        With all that wood on the gate it is going to be heavy so a wheel out near the swinging end is a good idea. You may also like to make the bottom hinge telescope so the gate can follow the ground. Should work good on that concreate driveway.

        John.

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        • #5
          Another thought is that you could put another hinge in the gate just past the land wheel, say 3 feet short of the end. Then the end section could be your walk through gate, save you swinging the larger gate all the time.

          John.

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          • #6
            It's a rare gate that won't sag eventually, regardless of the construction. All the more pronounced the bigger the gate.
            I also would make it in two sections, with the smaller as a 'walk-thru'.
            I had to go thru the same gate-enlargement several years ago after buying a boat bigger than the gate. I wasn't into metal working then, so mine was all wood, ...not a big as yours. But it still sags. I keep the swinging ends resting on a concrete pad, which helps that a lot. Have since traded that boat for a smaller fishing boat, and now seldom use the gate.
            Even with the welded metal frame, I'd still use an 'X' cross-bracing for regidity.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #7
              I just went down the Lowes and purchased screw in hinges for a gate. It was in the fencing supply area. I put in 3 for my 15' gate. I had a 20' piece of 1 1/4 tubing I bent two 90's in. I put regular fence posts on the other end. Put the 1/2" metal strapping across it to reinforce it. I put fence fabric on it and used the tie wire.

              It won't hold out a truck pushing up against it, but it keeps the pup in. I think it weighs less than 100 pounds if My calcs are right.

              I keep going to.. cut some different design and putting it up.. but I really hate to draw more attention to myself and my toys to the undesireables.

              David

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              • #8
                It would be hard to use a wheel the driveway on the other side slopes down too much.
                Mike

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                • #9
                  Make the wheel end a spring loaded arrangement that will support at least some of the weight and it will allow the wheel to go up and down on the driveway slope.

                  Joe

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                  • #10
                    Why not two 8' wide gates?

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                    • #11
                      Mount the gate on two 1-1/2" pillow block bearings,easy swing and grease lubed.

                      If you look you can probibly find some 2x4 or even 2x6 11ga tubing,edge on it would be strong with a single diagonal brace running from the top hinge side down to the bottom latch side.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        The posibility of sloping ground was why I sugested a sliding bottom hindge. Just a smaller section of RHS sliding inside the gate frame if your using square section. Used to work for a company that built dairy sheds. One design of yard was round with a gate swung from the centre. These gates made from galvanised pipe were often 30" plus would move 270deg The ground often would often have over a foot of fall for cleaning. With a sliding bottom hinge and a solid rubber tyre these easly traversed the 270deg. Yours only requires 90 deg of movement and the wheel probably only 13" from the hinge. Of course 2 8" gates would not need suport and probably a good option.

                        John.

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                        • #13
                          Not sure about the depth, mine are 32" since the last 24" was drilled into rock. The post have a 2' x 2' x 6" concrete pad at the top. I also ran 1/2" rebar through the post and rebar in an 18" square ring around the post. All rebar was welded together.

                          For hinges, I used 1" diameter solid bar. The pins are 11.5" long and are locked in the lower part of the hinge via a socket head cap screw. The hinges are adjusted by using a floor jack under the end and loosening the pair of set scews on each mounting rings and rotating.

                          http://community.webshots.com/photo/...68205268VtTTLy

                          http://community.webshots.com/photo/...68205199MhOCKA

                          The gates are 9 years old now, the wood was added this summer.

                          [This message has been edited by JPR (edited 07-27-2004).]
                          John

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                          • #14
                            The rear wheels, bearings and spindles bolt onto the front wheel drive cars these days.

                            THey work great for supporting a sliding gate. Trailers, rollers, etc...

                            David

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                            • #15
                              I've seen gates that were smaller and they both sagged and their weight pulled the hinge post out of square. A 16' gate, hinged on one side is a real challenge. The wheel is a common solution but you say that is not practical.

                              I don't think that a post that is only four feet in the ground is going to stand up to the stress over any period of time. I would definitely go deeper, perhaps 6, 8, or even 10 feet. An alternative would be to use diagonal bracing (like a guy line) on the back side of the post and solidly anchored in the ground. The concrete is definitely called for.

                              As for the gate itself, it will definitely need diagonal bracing. Divide it into four foot sections and weld a diagonal from the top corner of each section nearest the hinge side to the bottom corner that's further out. These diagonals will be in tension and need not be as big as the horizontals and verticals. 1/4" or 3/8" steel rod would do. Turnbuckles in the diagonals would be a good touch to allow taking up any sag that may develop over time. The H and V members sound like they should be perhaps or 2" steel angle or channel, 3/16" or 1/4" thickness. At least! Use the thinnest wood possible. Perhaps exterior plywood. Or aluminum slats - they do make vertical siding.

                              Perhaps a sliding gate would be possible. With a counterweight and proper bracing. Perhaps not. In my opinion, they hold up better than hinged ones of this size. But two posts wouls be needed for the rollers.

                              Paul A.

                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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