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Did that lever feed deal again..... it worked acceptably

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  • Did that lever feed deal again..... it worked acceptably

    Needed to trim down the outside of the gear case. I do not have a rotary table, (yes I need one) but I DO have a funky degree-marked turntable that I picked up long ago. It spins free, but can be locked for drilling or other dividing tasks.

    So, I indicated the case in on that turntable, going by the bore for the gear, and clamped it down with 4 clamps on the inside.

    Then I put the thing on the mill table, and proceeded to cut grooves in the corner area that was to be removed, to the proper depth of the outline I needed, leaving it a tad oversize for finishing. I used a small 3/16" end mill to help ensure that I was stronger than the machine.

    First I cut grooves spaced a bit under 3/16" apart.





    When they were cut to depth, I went back and cut out the remaining fins between slots



    At first, I tried just cutting progressively down, but found that to be hard to control. The cuts were much better when cutting a full slot, or at least a balanced cut removing a "fin".

    I used the end mill in horizontal mode for two reasons. First, I thought it would be less apt to get "run away with" if the end mill is cutting that way. Not sure that really is true. Second, I only have a few end mills that would reach and cut that much vertically (about 1.4 inches), and I prefer not to use them unless I need to.

    The last strip at the bottom I just cut off in the bandsaw. Cutting the whole depth with the saw was too slow, but after milling away the rest, it went fast enough.

    Yes, this is a bit "cave man", but not having a rotary table I do what I can. I just have not decided what size table to get, and likely will not until I get the Benchmaster going and see what usable space I end up with on that table. I really don't need to fit a rotary table on the Lewis, which I plan to leave in horizontal mode.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 01-23-2017, 02:57 AM.
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    Next I took it over to the belt sander to smooth out the irregularities and blend the curves.

    Views as partly done smoothing. I'll finish it another day. Done for tonight.



    Last edited by J Tiers; 01-23-2017, 02:59 AM.
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yep, get 'er done! Gets my vote!!

      Pete
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

      Comment


      • #4
        Interesting. I've considered doing something similar with the universal table. It can pivot 45 degrees each way. Haven't needed to do it yet, hopefully I will get a rotary table before I do. Still though, it would let me cut a much larger arc than a rotary table if I use the vertical head. You've got a pretty good lever there. Did you feel much grabbing from the cutter?

        Comment


        • #5
          More than one way to skin a cat. Good work.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #6
            That works, I would do the same. Nice job!
            Andy

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pinstripe View Post
              ..... You've got a pretty good lever there. Did you feel much grabbing from the cutter?
              Yes, it depended on the cut. When trying to cut downwards progressively, it was nasty, fought all the way, wanted to spin backwards, as I was "conventional milling" with the side of the end mill.

              With the full slot, it was well-behaved until just at the breakthrough, at which point the forces tended to reverse. Also when starting a cut, it would try to jump and buck to some degree. The lever was definitely NOT too long, and I am glad I went with a 3/16" and not the 1/4" I had in mind at first, which would have been worse.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                If the part has a long handle I do jobs like this on the vertical mill using a pin or boss with a retainer at the top to stop the part lifting, otherwise clamped to the rotary table. Cut full depth, deal with the corners first, light cuts, always feed against rotation of cutter. Don't let go of the handle!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nothing wrong there, I had to do similar shortly after I got my Rivett. The changegear carrier was broken and I had to fit a replacement... no easy task since none of the parts are really interchangeable between machines. I had to clearance one of the T slots that locks it to the lathe bed, and rigged up pretty much the same thing on my little mill. It was a non-stop pucker-fest but it got the job done nicely.
                  Max
                  http://joyofprecision.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is how you make do with what you've got. Pretty much what HSM is about. Kudos!
                    Kansas City area

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have become quite good at extemporizing, over the years. I have better tools now than I did years ago, both mechanical and electronic. I need to do some things that I do not have the tools for every so often to keep my hand in.

                      What it REALLY does is re-prioritize the list of items for acquisition.

                      If this sort of operation is going to come up this much, the R/T has moved up the list! But it is still waiting on more action with the Benchmaster, so I can use that and get a handle on what is reasonable to expect and how table travel works out. I REALLY want to find one of those 36" tables for the B-M.......

                      This adjustment device will be immediately useful in finishing the B-M, but it is also somewhat in the nature of "displacement activity", because I am tired of working on the B-M for the moment. I can only take so much scraping for simultaneous alignment in 3 dimensions at any given time before I need to do something else..

                      Left on the list for this project is cutting a keyway in the ram, cutting a slot for the worm retainer, and making the retainer itself.
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 01-23-2017, 07:50 PM.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Why don't you make a rotary table, that's basically what your current project is. You could make it with a lower profile than the average comercial offering.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Robin R View Post
                          Why don't you make a rotary table, that's basically what your current project is. You could make it with a lower profile than the average comercial offering.
                          Cuz I really don't particularly want to, actually. But, yes, this is pretty similar in the basics. I DO have a design in the works. But it's really duplicating things that have been done for decades, and the low profile is harder to achieve than you might think, so there may not be a lot of advantage to offset the work involved, when a couple hundred bucks gets the coon.

                          For your amusement, here is HORRIBLE HERESY a milling cutter in a drill chuck.......it can't work, it will make your hair fall out, it will make you cross-eyed, you CAN'T DO THAT.



                          It worked fine, it was the only way to do the job because the slot was very deep, and my hair fell out long ago..... cross-eyed we can argue about.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions.

                          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                          Comment

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