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  • #16
    Even sites like this asks for a date of birth when creating an account. Every Jan 1st, I get all kinds of automated birthday wishes. Stupid people.

    The site you hit just wanted you to make an account before you can purchase something. Why? Because they can sell the information they collect. Not saying they do sell the information, but they could. Either that or some marketing type is thinking about how great they could target their advertising (that nobody looks at). Easiest solution is to lie. Give them the information they need to provide the product you want from them and lie about the rest.

    If YOU want them to ship something to you, then, yeah, they're going to need a real name, address, and probably phone number too. Not a whole lot more. If YOU just want to post a stupid comment on their forum, then you're a 90 year old grandma named Franklin that likes surfing and rock climbing, right?

    I really don't understand those pathetically stupid marketing managers that seem to think they can ask all kinds of irrelevant questions and actually expect to get that great dataset to mine that they dream of. It's going to be full of useless garbage. The more I can skew their reports, the happier I am.

    As part of my work, I had to install some stupid accounting application. They added a stupid registration system that had to be run on each and every computer... they went through great lengths to make sure it had to run. The required registration asked 2 full pages of questions with mandatory answers. Took me about 45 seconds to start the automated process that installed an entire lab full of computers and 10 minutes per machine to get through that registration. So, I filled it in, every one slightly different... typos, off by one errors,the works... anyone that wanted useful information out of that database is going to have to spend longer cleaning up the mess than I spent registering all those labs full of computers. Next time, I swear I'll start adding SQL injections and buffer overflows to test how well they sanitise their inputs. Idiots.

    David...
    http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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    • #17
      I was told that sometimes sites get hijack cloned then they use it to phish (if that's what they call it) data, I tend to be very nervous about buying off sites wanting lots of Intel.
      I tend to look at the item get the phone number and ring them to place an order, then it's payed with a card with limited funds, not my main one, seems to work.
      Mark

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      • #18
        Folks, some of you are missing an opportunity.

        I fill out those personal info blanks with bogus information. That way when they sell your info to data mining companies, it messed up their database. If birthdates don't match, then it must be yet another John Doe.

        Steve

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        • #19
          Originally posted by boslab View Post
          I was told that sometimes sites get hijack cloned then they use it to phish (if that's what they call it) data,
          Right!

          Just to amplify a bit, that means that even if there is a legitimate company with that name, the web site you give your information to may not be under their control.

          There are lots of ways to accomplish this, one of the most common involves your clicking on a link in an email. But I've also seen viruses that would hijack your Google search results, to fool you into clicking on a link to a bogus web site. And there are many others (including the legitimate web server getting hacked).

          The web site may appear authentic in every way, but some hacker is copying everything you put into it, including your password and any personal information.

          "Caveat Emptor" doesn't begin to cover it, should be more like "Abandon hope, all ye who enter here."

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          • #20
            Alistair,

            If the page that's causing all of your worries is indeed the one that Arcane showed, then I don't see any problem at all. Yes, they ask for "your password". They don't mean the password to your email, bank account, nuclear launch codes etc, they simply want you to give a password that you'll use to log into your account with them. Make up a new one.

            The date of birth thing, yeah, lots do this - maybe so they can send you a "happy birthday and would you like to buy more stuff" email. Enter Jan 01 - lots of people do. Or, leave it blank - it's not a mandatory field.

            It doesn't look like a scam to me, just another company doing business on the web.

            Ian
            All of the gear, no idea...

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            • #21
              Congratulations Ian B, just beat me to it with the "Password" clarification. Shouldn't take a lot to work out but shows how simple it is for some to be fleeced.

              Regards Ian.
              You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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              • #22
                I am annoyed that Arcane could find something personal I wrote on my computer no offense to him at all but how is he able to recount what I wrote in a thing I sent supposedly to another company and not to him. Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
                  I am annoyed that Arcane could find something personal I wrote on my computer no offense to him at all but how is he able to recount what I wrote in a thing I sent supposedly to another company and not to him.
                  I expect that your system is set up to remember the values that you've filled in the form with and is just filling them in for you when the page is reloaded. When I access that link I just see a bunch of empty fields.

                  (It's fairly easy to change what your browser does in these cases if you tell us what browser you are using. I use Chrome and with it the setting are under Settings->Advanced->Passwords and Forms->Enable Autofill. Other browsers will have other ways of changing the autofill and/or clearing the autofill data).

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                  • #24
                    Alistair,

                    As far as I can see, Arcane didn't find anything on your computer. Here's what I think he did:

                    - He took the original link that you posted, showing the lantern
                    - He then removed details of the product from the link, leaving him with the site's homepage - www.lesara.co.uk
                    - He then clicked the "register" link to get the page that he showed.

                    Nothing to do with your personal details, anyone can do this. I'm sure that when he accessed the registration page, it showed blank fields, not any of what you entered.

                    Ian
                    All of the gear, no idea...

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                    • #25
                      I do a lot of business online in the course of my daily activities. 3D printer purchases, hardware purchases and so on.

                      Here's a couple of things I had to do to protect my ass-er assets.

                      1) I pay through a payment provider like paypal. I put exactly the amount I am spending in there and not a penny more. And I don't link to an external account. This way if they hack me they only get that amount and not a penny more nor can they affect my bank accounts.

                      2) I generally reach out to a company before I make a purchase. "Hi my name is Max and I am interested in item 666-1313-9.7..." I dialog back and forth, get to know the people in charge then place an order. That way if anything goes wrong I can get on the horn and say "I ordered 666-1313-9.7 on Tuesday my account was charged but it never arrived..." Only had this happen a few times and it was glitches on their end with the shopping cart software or so they said.

                      THIS way if there ever is a major problem they know me I know them and it's easier to get something resolved.

                      3) I never ever buy using a credit or debit card online. I don't care what kind of fraud protection the bank offers I do NOT care how "secure" my connection claims to be I refuse to do it. Fact is eventually someone will intercept my information, cross reference it with the instances of "true" data I had to provide and I'll be making a fraud claim. Had to do so twice, and after the second time I instituted these policies.

                      I don't make a lot of money doing what I do, but it's a living and I would NOT change it for more money. So I am understandably protective of my ass -- I mean assets when it comes down to it.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Ian B View Post
                        Alistair,

                        As far as I can see, Arcane didn't find anything on your computer. Here's what I think he did:

                        - He took the original link that you posted, showing the lantern
                        - He then removed details of the product from the link, leaving him with the site's homepage - www.lesara.co.uk
                        - He then clicked the "register" link to get the page that he showed.

                        Nothing to do with your personal details, anyone can do this. I'm sure that when he accessed the registration page, it showed blank fields, not any of what you entered.

                        Ian
                        Yeah, that's exactly what I did of course. I don't know if he's trying to be funny or if he's serious. I hope it's the former because the latter doesn't bode well.
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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