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Alternative galaxies - WAS Antikythera mechanism

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    and the wheel is round piece of something dating back to Og and would be quite obvious to all. Stop always always trying to sell the feed bag as good to go without running it through thresher first.

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  • Evan
    replied
    A basic compass is a pretty piece of magnetite that was being washed and then floated on something in a bowl of water. That is a discovery and would be quite obvious to many people. It isn't very special at all. I would not be at all surprised if it dates back to stone age days.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    The compass was not an invention, it was a discovery
    No, the earths magnetic poles were a discovery. Balancing something magnet on a pivot so it can point to them is certainly an invention. Discovery is noticing, inventing is making.

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  • Evan
    replied
    The markings are unnecessary as long as one can tell which end is which. Birds do not have markings in their internal compass. At any rate it is not comparable. As I said the Chinese did invent many things.

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  • RichR
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    The compass was not an invention, it was a discovery and a very simple one.
    Magnetism is a discovery. Realizing that a magnetic object that can freely pivot always points in the same direction is a discovery. Once
    markings were added so one could determine direction the compass was invented.

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  • Evan
    replied
    The compass was not an invention, it was a discovery and a very simple one. While the Chinese did invent many things including some things to do with metal it is not clear that they did much in the way of true precision metalworking other than extremely talented making of swords and knives. But that is figuring out just how to heat and beat metals, not how to make highly accurate mathematically defined constructs. Their methods of writing did not lend itself well to mathematics for a very long time. They did understand many forms of math but in quite a different way. For instance, they did use binary a lot but that does not lend itself to complex calculations by humans. There were some that were very good at math but that was mostly later in the AD centuries.

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  • bob_s
    replied
    Given that the compass dates from around 200 BC in China, their level of technology was most likely equivalent or superior to that of the Greeks.

    Look at Chinese population migration and trade throughout southeast asia, Malaysia, ...

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  • Evan
    replied
    As I said the source of the metal can be determined with high accuracy. Not just what country but what range of hills and valley(s). Lead contains traces of uranium and that makes it easy to determine just where it comes from. It is Greek or at least the metal is. Also, there wasn't a great deal of long distance trade back then. People walked a lot.

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  • bob_s
    replied
    The assumption has been made that this was a Greek invention.

    Recall that Alexander the Great conquered most of the known world. This device could have been part of the plunder of India. It could also have been from China, after all central China has had continuous human habitation for around 160000 years.

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  • Evan
    replied
    I am not certain but the age may well have been determined by the alloy and the exact isotopic composition of the alloy. That can now be used to determine where the metal came from with high accuracy and in some cases when it was formed into a man made alloy.

    http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/artic...j#!divAbstract

    Lead isotopic analysis may be of great interest for provenance determination of ancient bronze artefacts.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Westline View Post
    I know this is way later in history but also ahead of is his time is the Babbage differance engine ... I'm sure Chris can tackle that one if he has a few years to kill ��
    I've seen it the Science Museum, beautiful stuff. We often view the past with fondness ill deserved.....who would want to give up all the modern conveniences, healthcare, science and technology.....but damn, I wish I was alive in the era of cheap brass!

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  • Rustybolt
    replied
    Originally posted by malbenbut View Post
    How did the experts put an age to it. I've never seen any evidence on how its age was ascertained. For all I know it may only be less than 100 years old, however the maths is amazing whatever age it is.

    MBB
    I think the determined the age based on other artifacts they found in the wreckage.

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  • malbenbut
    replied
    How did the experts put an age to it. I've never seen any evidence on how its age was ascertained. For all I know it may only be less than 100 years old, however the maths is amazing whatever age it is.

    MBB

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  • jamby
    replied
    Boy do I feel like a duck out of water. I am still trying to grasp the function of the gear with the pin to replicate the elliptic orbit of the moon.

    Jim

    Don't know much about gears but I ground a few out of an old ford

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  • Westline
    replied
    I'm a bit late to this thread but I recently watched the first episode of Clicksprings project .... He really does beautiful work .... Is Chris on the forum just for interest sake?

    I know this is way later in history but also ahead of is his time is the Babbage differance engine ... I'm sure Chris can tackle that one if he has a few years to kill 😬

    Leave a comment:

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