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O/T: Sorry. A Train question.

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  • O/T: Sorry. A Train question.

    Skip this really O/T dribble and go to "braking"

    I have to come to like trains, of all varieties. It might have something to do with the Norther Pacific or whoever owns the rails. I hear them everyday, hear one right now. Its a freight. Th people movers are not as slow, or long. lol. Our trains seem to be about 25-50 cars, I dont know, just going over the timing. They horn at four spots in my rural town, and one more on a good night from the Oxnard crossing.



    BRAKING.. Trains and braking. When the Engines are linked up to many cars how do the brakes work? Are they interconnected with high pressure air? I thought it used to be like that, like on road trucks and vans. Loose air and the brakes lock up.

    When you bust an air line are all the rest of the cars brakes locked? JR

  • #2
    I believe that is correct, it takes air pressure to release the brakes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Each car has an air reservoir that must be filled from the car-to-car pipe and hose system from the engine, and if that primary pressure is released due to a broken hose, or by the engine stopping, the reservoirs apply air pressure to the brakes. Of course, if the reservoirs lose pressure, the brakes will release. So a disconnected car should have the manual brakes applied, or wheel chocks, to prevent it from moving.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railway_air_brake
      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
      USA Maryland 21030

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is a good explanation of railroad air brakes:

        http://www.railway-technical.com/brake2.shtml

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
          Here is a good explanation of railroad air brakes:

          http://www.railway-technical.com/brake2.shtml
          Wow .. that must have been written a while back. Everything is pretty much spot on except where he is
          talking about applying the brakes by releasing air from the brake pipe and then going to lap to lock that in.
          There may be a couple of yard switchers around that have that brake valve, but they haven't been used on
          the road in decades.

          Now they use a brake valve that you just set/reduce the air by pulling the brake handle and it laps so to speak
          automatically and the air compressor does not disengage because it has to maintain that reduced pressure in
          the brake pipe. If this new reduced pressure in the brake pipe is not maintained, it will leak down and the
          brakes will continue to set harder.

          Back in Pennsylvania coming down the horseshoe curve in Altoona, it was a pretty steep grade like 10 or 20 miles
          long (can't remember). Anyways .. when we came out of the tunnel at the top and started down the hill you had
          to set just the right amount of air. It was a matter of the train running away, or you having to have it in notch 8
          (full throttle) to pull it down the hill.

          Man .. the stories I could tell you.
          John Titor, when are you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Just mentioning trains sure brings back some memories. This is the one that ran past my back yard when I was about 5 to maybe 7 years old, then they took it off the road. I would run out and lie down a few feet away from the track so I could see flames in the boiler through various cracks. The engineer knew I would be out there on his twice a day run and would toot just for me to alert me he was coming.



            It was a run from Walnut Creek to San Ramon, on the east side of the Berkeley hills.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              http://neme-s.org/Altoona_Memorial_R...oader_muse.htm

              Photos from the Horseshoe curve in Altoona PA

              Errol
              Errol Groff

              New England Model Engineering Society
              http://neme-s.org/

              YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the replies guys! JR

                Comment


                • #9
                  Some years a go a logging train went over the cliff in the Canadian Rockies when the air brakes failed, after that Canadian Pacific R.R. mandated dynamic braking to be included on all Loco. traversing the Rockies.
                  They purchased a couple of old Loco's from a US rail where they were used on the flatlands of Ohio, so I was asked to retro-fit them with dynamic braking system.

                  http://s145.photobucket.com/user/Max...deshow/Railway
                  Max.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some cool photos! Thanks!

                    I found a typo in the text for the plaque "Watching The Curve". Anyone else find it?



                    What is the purpose of the two sharply curved tracks at the entrance to the building? I would assume it might be a derailer for a runaway car. It seems too short to be used as a siding for two cars to switch position.

                    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                    USA Maryland 21030

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A swap out for tenders?
                      Max.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                        What is the purpose of the two sharply curved tracks at the entrance to the building? I would assume it might be a derailer for a runaway car. It seems too short to be used as a siding for two cars to switch position.
                        It's a passing point for the short cars on the funicular railway. Just google "funicular railway car passing"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I also thought that's what it might be. Looking closely I can see the car in the shed. Here's more info:

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funicular
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                          USA Maryland 21030

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Missing the apostrophe in "days".
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We have the royal gorge route - it's a scenic people carrier, I know the guy who owns it - real nice guy.

                              not to be a buzzkill but tragedy struck last year when a female conductor fell off between cars and literally got cut in half on the tracks for allot of people to see, really shook my little town up... nice lady.

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