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Help salvaging a Kurt D40

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  • Help salvaging a Kurt D40

    I purchased an old Kurt D40 several years ago. The screw moving the jaw is frozen. It appears to be an older model and doesn't match up with the model on the Kurt website. Any suggestions? Is the locking collar threaded on? There was a grub screw that I was able to remove. Thanks for your help.








  • #2
    I would lube it up and then use an impact wrench lightly and maybe a little heat.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ALee View Post
      It appears to be an older model and doesn't match up with the model on the Kurt website.
      On Kurt's D40 Replacement Parts page, the exploded parts diagram seems to illustrate the same vise as shown in your images.

      What is going on with the apparent drilling/peening damage at the end of the nut (Item 7, p/n #D40-3). Is it possible that this has damaged the threads in the bore of #D40-3, locking it in place on Item 16, p/n #D40-5A Screw? On second look, the threads of D40-5A are visible - the damage may just be from careless use.

      Originally posted by ALee
      Is the locking collar threaded on?
      Only judging from the diagram, my vote is no.

      Edit: Item 15, p/n #D40-217A is a Spiral Retaining Ring. If you clean well and look closely, the outer end of the spiral should be visible and there ought to be a reduced section at the tip which is useful for getting a purchase with a small flatblade screwdriver. Wear eye protection then start by extracting this tip and proceed by winding the remaining portion of the SRR out of the recess.
      Last edited by EddyCurr; 02-04-2017, 05:06 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ALee View Post
        Ignore my earlier remark about the Spiral Ring Retainer. Your inital picture clearly shows a significant difference between your vise and the one in the parts illustration.

        Looks like someone has already applied pliers or a pipe wrench, going by tooth marks visible on the circumference.

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        • #5
          The retainer nut is threaded on, removing it should allow you to push the screw and nut assembly out of the body. The screw being bound up in the nut is a common issue, usually due to galling. It can a really bear to get it loose if at all. Turn it upright and soak with a good penetrating oil (not WD40 lol). Go from there...
          Mike
          Central Ohio, USA

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          • #6
            Thanks for everyone's suggestions. I'll try soaking with penetrating oil. It just seems odd that Kurt would design a threaded locking collar without flats for a wrench. I don't see how I'm going to get it off without marring the surface.

            Any ideas if it is left or right hand thread?

            Sent from my HTC6525LVW using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Pretty sure those are RH. Thread a set screw into the hole and see if using the short end of the Allen key as a wrench will break it loose.
              Mike
              Central Ohio, USA

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              • #8
                Originally posted by riverhawk View Post
                I would lube it up and then use an impact wrench lightly and maybe a little heat.
                I second that - along with reverse to foreword shots...

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                • #9
                  Hmmm...I like the idea of penetrating oil for a couple of days, then hitting it lightly with an impact on that hex end.

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                  • #10
                    Enough heat and impact with penetrating oil will loosen any thread/nut combination unless it's welded.
                    Bill
                    I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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                    • #11
                      It won't be the marks that jammed it, the screw doesn;t reach that far inside. Just jammed.

                      If you can get the plug out of the other end, and fill it with diesel and some oil it may loosen. Or wait a bit here and someone will suggest ATF and.......................
                      4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                      CNC machines only go through the motions

                      "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                        If you can get the plug out of the other end, and fill it with diesel and some oil it may loosen. Or wait a bit here and someone will suggest ATF and.......................
                        can't even remember if mine has one but yeah if it's not out definitely get it out and attack it from that end with penetrating oil

                        great suggestion

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                        • #13
                          I had a similar problem with a Kurt vise. In my case the threads were gunked up with dried coolant. So I soaked the whole vise in water, taking it out from time to time to work the screw back and forth. As the water dissolved the dried coolant, the screw started moving more and more until I finally was able to run it all the way out, then clean everything thoroughly. If I remember correctly it took several days. The water has to slowly work its way along the threads.

                          I would definitely never use an impact wrench on it. Patience has less chance of damaging anything.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
                            I had a similar problem with a Kurt vise. In my case the threads were gunked up with dried coolant. So I soaked the whole vise in water, taking it out from time to time to work the screw back and forth.


                            I would definitely never use an impact wrench on it. Patience has less chance of damaging anything.
                            I like your idea, old coolant can and will gum up the works. I have had success with the back and forth method along with some nice detergent fluid, like gasoline Or a lil heat from an air heat gun.

                            I also like the idea of an impact wrench to shock the "sticktion" more than a big wrench just applying a constant force.

                            When I say impact wrench I am talking about liberal use, just small wacks at a time, not full throttle and see what breaks first.

                            Thanks for posting your predicament, looking forward to see what the fix is. JR

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I offer my thanks also....

                              I do not have a Kurt, but now I see how they are made, always wondered about that, and you answered the question I never asked but wanted to know about. Photos perfect!
                              4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                              CNC machines only go through the motions

                              "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                              Comment

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