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Enerpac P80 10k

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  • Enerpac P80 10k

    So picked up this at the flea market today. I know they are typically used as a porta power type deal but I really dont have a use for that. I thought about possible using it for a shop press I would like to build. Any thoughts on if thats possible. I really dont like the idea of only having power in one direction or being manual but maybe this could be used until I scavenge exactly what I want. It was only 25.00 so even if its not used its not a great loss.


    [IMG][/IMG]

  • #2
    No reason it cant work for a shop press, I have seen commercial presses set up with essentially the same thing. Not sure if there is some clever arrangement of valves that would let you power the cylinder in both directions, but even if not, going "up" under power is not quite so key on a press. Good find for 25 bucks.

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    • #3
      that's a great deal - nice find! Did it come with a hose?

      I have a P39 pump with a 10t Enerpac press (I have a couple of threads on here about it) and it works great. I don't know about the P80, but mine is single stage, one way, so the ram has to have a retraction spring in it to push the fluid back into the pump. It isn't the quickest thing in the world to use, but it does the job - I've used mine for replacing wheel bearings, pressing apart drill chucks and other bits'n'bobs.

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      • #4
        well im curious about something. Based on the specs off the site its listed as a 2 stage pump (good) but only to provide 1in of travel for a cylinder. Does it just not hold enough fluid ??? I think im not understanding something

        http://www.enerpac.com/en-us/industr...eel-hand-pumps

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=mattthemuppet;1097848]that's a great deal - nice find! Did it come with a hose?

          QUOTE]


          Yes there is a hose but its crap. The outside is pretty cracked up and some falling off. It will definitely need a hose.

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          • #6
            [QUOTE=Axkiker;1097936]
            Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
            that's a great deal - nice find! Did it come with a hose?

            QUOTE]


            Yes there is a hose but its crap. The outside is pretty cracked up and some falling off. It will definitely need a hose.
            Be ready when they tell you how much six feet of 10ksi hose is.

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=metalmagpie;1097939]
              Originally posted by Axkiker View Post

              Be ready when they tell you how much six feet of 10ksi hose is.

              Yeah ive heard its expensive. What I was thinking about doing is just using it with a cylinder that takes only 3k. I would have to install a gauge to make sure I didnt exceede the line capacity.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                well im curious about something. Based on the specs off the site its listed as a 2 stage pump (good) but only to provide 1in of travel for a cylinder.
                You missed the "Per Stroke" bit!
                Given that the pump is in the head fitting and the main cylinder is just fluid storage for the pump a basic comprehension of how these work would lead one to question the idea of a 1" total travel for a driven cylinder ;-)
                If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
                  You missed the "Per Stroke" bit!
                  Given that the pump is in the head fitting and the main cylinder is just fluid storage for the pump a basic comprehension of how these work would lead one to question the idea of a 1" total travel for a driven cylinder ;-)
                  HAHAHAHAHHA yeah totally missed that. Yup im an idiot lol

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                  • #10
                    There was a display here recently of fire-fighting equipment, part of which is hydraulic actuators for extracting people from crushed vehicles, etc. Some of those devices are spreaders, some are pinchers. Both have applications in metal forming.

                    I bought one of those kits not long ago, with the intent to convert the actuators to portable mini benders, etc. It seems that in my shop, benders are useful and important tools- I now have one commercially made bender for sheet materials, and at least three other shop-made specialty benders. One of them is what I call a finger bender- not for bending your fingers, but being open-ended it allows multiple bends that couldn't be made in any other bender. It has become one of the most used tools in the shop.

                    You can buy what some call a universal bender, made for flat bar up to 2 inches wide or so, plus round bar using appropriate dies, etc. I usually see these as hand powered, but there would be good reason in many cases to have hydraulic actuation. There is less reason to need this powered other than by hand, so the enerpac is ideal. Lots of force in a small area, with very good control for a minimal investment.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                      HAHAHAHAHHA yeah totally missed that. Yup im an idiot lol
                      No, that's too harsh.
                      You just haven't used one before, then skim read the manual and didn't spot the incongruity of the conclusion you reached ;-)
                      I've been using one for over 20 years and have rebuilt both cylinders and pumps and have refilled the pump periodically to replace the fluid lost in disconnecting ;-)
                      If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                        well im curious about something. Based on the specs off the site its listed as a 2 stage pump (good) but only to provide 1in of travel for a cylinder. Does it just not hold enough fluid ??? I think im not understanding something

                        http://www.enerpac.com/en-us/industr...eel-hand-pumps

                        1 cubic inch of oil per stroke of the handle. Actual cylinder motion depends on the bore of the cylinder.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's your hose-

                          http://www.ebay.com/itm/6-ft-Hydraul...sViKhW-pgUyTFA

                          If you mount the pump vertically with the pump at the bottom,you can then add an external reservoir as large as needed.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Great find, some of the cylinders have a return spring built in when you open the valve it goes in. If you can spend the extra and get a hollow ram they are a lot more versatile.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The one inch of travel is for the pump piston. Based on the .15 cu in per stroke figure, it would take almost 7 strokes of the handle to move 1 cu in of fluid. There's no reason to believe that you couldn't give it 10 strokes, or more- of course there is going to be a limit by virtue of the capacity of the stored fluid, but I'd think it to be way more than one cubic inch.

                              For the two stage piston, you could theoretically generate about 1500 lbs of fluid pressure at the one cubic inch per stroke mode- and in any event a larger driven cylinder would amplify the force delivered as has been stated.

                              85 lbs of force on the handle delivering 1500 lbs fluid pressure translates into a mechanical advantage of about 17 to 1, which does look about right from the pictures.
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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