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riviting parts and rust prevntion

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  • partsproduction
    replied
    http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667

    I bought some of each of the three winners, out of 46 treatments three worked to prevent rust after even 288 days exposed. But I'm wondering what would happen if one or all of the three would accept paint over it and continue to provide rust prevention?
    I live on the Oregon coast, heck, all of Oregon is rusty, especially politicians brains. Rust prevention is a big deal for me in my business.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    Since it is made from steel and while not exposed to the elements it may still rust, even when painted.
    Does not compute. Any paint job should do.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    How about doing the assembly and wicking some thinned down Shellac into the joints which can be painted over after the alcohol evaporates?

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  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by Lee Cordochorea View Post
    Step one: make it rust evenly on purpose. Step two: use a phosphoric acid rust converter to make a tenaciously ahereing iron phosphate coating. Step three: primer. Step four: paint.
    This is something I do with a lot of things. Works nice on cycle headers, went from repainting them every year to a light touch up of stone chips every fall when I put the bikes away for the winter.
    Never tried it with with riveted assemblies though.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Depending on how big it'll be and assuming you are going to brush paint it what about thinning down some of the paint to put over the riveted joints and simply flex the model slightly to encourage the well thinned paint to wick into the joints? The paint itself would then be your sealant. And to some extent a bonding agent. After these joint seal applications dry carry on with painting the rest of the model in the originally intended manner. If the very thin paint left anything you don't like just lightly sand it off. It won't be very thick. And I've found that solvent thinned paints tend to love to wick into the tiniest of cracks and onto my fingers. So perhaps it's time to make that trait into a positive thing?

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  • Tony Ennis
    replied
    Can you get the parts primed professionally? I don't know what they use at professional body shops, but a 12-pack would probably get a small model primed when they're doing some other job.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    If this is a model, why not make it with aluminum instead of steel? Will it see some kind of rough use?
    It will just be a display model, no rough use. Steel is what was used on the original so I am making the model out of steel and aluminum even painted looks like aluminum.

    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    I assume you will cold-set them, as hot setting would destroy any paint coating.

    .
    Yes the rivets are cold formed, squeezed actually (they don't get painted until the end) and after final assembly everything except those parts that have to be bare metal like the breech will be painted.

    Originally posted by JoeCB View Post
    Best idea yet, Paul... but one better, use brass sheet and brass rivets
    Joe B
    Have you priced brass sheet and bar stock lately, Caaachinggggggggg and then some.


    I only need to coat these areas to help stop rust in the joints before the parts are assembled because paint will not get into the joint area after the parts are riveted together.

    Red Rustoleum or solder will do blue is to complicated for this and is actually a type of rust (the pretty kind) anyway.

    Thanks for the replies.

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  • JoeCB
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    If this is a model, why not make it with aluminum instead of steel? Will it see some kind of rough use?
    Best idea yet, Paul... but one better, use brass sheet and brass rivets
    Joe B

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    If this is a model, why not make it with aluminum instead of steel? Will it see some kind of rough use?

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  • Lee Cordochorea
    replied
    Step one: make it rust evenly on purpose. Step two: use a phosphoric acid rust converter to make a tenaciously ahereing iron phosphate coating. Step three: primer. Step four: paint.

    Leave a comment:


  • RichR
    replied
    This may be a little out there, but what if you dip the steel in copper sulphate to give it a thin copper plating?

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  • wdtom44
    replied
    I think it depends on where you life, how humid it is. Even so you are doing a lot to keep it from rusting with the paint. After the paint is dry and cured good you could put a small amount of oil in the seams and maybe it would wick into the joint if the paint has left any opening. After a few days wipe off the excess oil.

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  • Robin R
    replied
    I think I would go with a zinc rich primer, you could coat the mating faces before assembly, then the rest of it after assembly. It might be worth looking into copper rivets, they won't rust and should be easier to cold set.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It depends a great deal on the primer. Ordinary thin gray automotive etc. primer will often rust through. But, for instance, the yellow and red Rustoleum anti-rust primers act more like a paint, and I have not seen them rust through unless the rust was not cleared out to begin with. They probably classify as primer-sealers.

    If you eliminate coatings, and don't like galvanizing for some unknown reason (why?*), it does not leave a lot of options. So some sort of coating is probably in order.

    Hit the parts with good old red lead primer before assembly, you won't have an issue....and it will likely be just like full size practice....

    Boiled linseed oil on the parts will do a good job of sealing. It does not count as oil, since it will polymerize just like paint.

    Most paint-like coatings would be rubbed off in the riveting process, and then there is the question of the rivets, will THEY be painted as well? I assume you will cold-set them, as hot setting would destroy any paint coating. You are bound to get some bare areas from the assembly process, if you demand a perfect coating, tinning is likely best, although even it will not be perfect.

    Riveted bridges with hot set rivets seem to stand the test of time, so you likely are worried about things that will not actually be an issue.



    * the effect of galvanizing would probably work right down into the rivet holes. It has some "throw" capability.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Parkerizing or bluing or other treatments don't prevent rust on their own. They act as a surface that better holds oil. That's why it's used on firearms. To better hold an oil film.

    I'd suggest you coat the edges after drilling with a thin wipe of boiled linseed oil. A THIN coat left over night or for 24 hours in a fairly warm place will polymerize just fine and produces a thin varnish like layer to resist rusting and it will bond well to most primers and paints that are not lacquer based. If it is still sticky after the 24 hours then you left too much on.

    I've been coating my garden tools after use with a 50-50 mix of boiled linseed and mineral spirits. Just a very thin wipe down that barely leaves it wet looking is enough to prevent rust despite storing the tools in an open shed through even the wettest season. Prior to using the BLO mixture they would rust badly.

    The coating isn't very durable so each time the tools are used much in sand or other abrasive material it needs re-coating but the good part is that dirt slides off it well instead of sticking in clumps like it did to the rusty shovels.

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