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Mystery Lathe???????

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  • Mystery Lathe???????

    Hello Friends I have a mystery lathe here, seems old and a "hobby" type lathe but it works like a charm. I need a stud gear (or I need to make one) and wanted to see if I could find a quick change for it... but cant ID it. Anyone with any info would be great, otherwise, its baptism by fire for gear making for me!



  • #2
    I have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA what kind that is, and I do not know about the stud gear.

    BUT....

    You own the second one of those that I have seen. I saw one at a tag sale a year or so back. Absolutely must be the same type machine. The crazy people at the sale thought it was an Atlas, but that was just because an atlas catalog sheet was on top of the pile of paper with it. Next one down was a Southbend catalog sheet.... It's quite obviously neither of them.

    Photobucket is AFU for me this evening, so I can't post the pics I have, but I asked about it here at the time.

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...=mystery+lathe

    I searched all over for the thing, trying to identify it. Never could. I eventually decided someone put it together out of parts from several machines.

    Now here you come along, and you have ANOTHER one....! Proving that the one I saw was not a hybrid, unless you bought it from Missouri, or it came from here.

    Too bad I didnt open the gear case and take a good pic of that. Might have helped, but I didn't know you would be along and need parts.

    It looks like you either have a lot missing, or much of yours is taken off for cleaning.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 02-28-2017, 01:39 AM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      go to Tony's lathe site and start looking - lets see how obsessive compulsive you are. (I've failed that test before)
      .

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      • #4
        That is an Atlas milling attachment anyhow.

        The lathe, no idea.
        Andy

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        • #5
          The little pink attachment with the small rubber tires has me really confused?
          Maybe it's just a toy lathe for kids?
          Bill
          I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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          • #6
            It does look similar to early Clausing lathes but not quite. Style is close but yours has the headstock cover hinged at the front and the clutch and half-nut controls are in different positions. I suppose it's not out of the question that there might have been more model changes than Tony's site has pictures for. There's also the Clausing/Atlas confusion. Atlas bought Clausing, put their own name on Clausing machines at first and then found that customers had less respect for the Atlas name so they returned the Clausing name for that line. However, there was that brief period of Clausing designs with Atlas badges.
            .
            "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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            • #7
              Do you have the change gears and banjo they go on?

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              • #8
                They (change gears and banjo) are on the table behind the lathe in one picture.
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

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                • #9
                  I looked through Tony's site when I saw that one at the sale. No dice.

                  When thinking of "what it looks like", you need to remember some other facts here:

                  1) It has two flat ways and two V ways, BUT the V ways are only for the carriage, the flat ways are INSIDE. THAT is a more unusual setup than most.

                  2) There are some other very distinctive features which cannot be discounted, because they are known to be on TWO machines in widely different places. These include the belt cover, the two bosses on the crosslide, and the small hole in the tailstock, among others.

                  3) It's no good assuming it was assembles out of different pieces from various machines, because we know of TWO with the very same features. Unless someone bought leftovers from several makers, modified them, and made them into lathes on something of a production basis, assuming it is a "frankenlathe" is just not the answer.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #10
                    The key features such as the bed rail arrangement and head stock shape are things that don't change. But I can see mid run changes to things like covers based on various reasons coming along. So I'd tend to look for "that's close to what I've got" then focus on the "fingerprint" features such as the bed rail configuration and main casting shapes. As Jerry is saying the way this lathe uses the bed is very much a key feature of its "fingerprint".
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the replies! Yes its the worlds most unusual lathe!. The banjo and gears are fine I just took them off because I am exploring/cleaning and I need a new stud gear. Its fullsize, by that I mean its capable of machining steel about 6-9" in diameter probably 30" ++ I havent measured. It does work just fine I have some peices I have machined for experimentation.

                      I just cant get over that there is NO INFO for this, and it seems like a mutt... like its built from other lathes but because there is at least 2 others that I have seen... one from this site and another from another site, It had to have been made by someone. Maybe a startup company that didnt make it very far? I have no idea.

                      The reverse headstock cover is totally whack, I cant see that on any other major brand. I think I will be fine, I just love trying to find out all the details of something.

                      I have a friend in the metals industry I will be visiting in the next couple weeks to purchase some stock for the gears I want to make, Ill keep you posted!

                      Scott

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                      • #12
                        The one I saw appeared to be about a 12" swing.

                        Is yours smaller? You said a 6" to 9" diameter..... maybe you meant swing over crosslide, which would be about right.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are a myriad of South Bend model A clones, including one made in Canada.

                          The bed configuration matches that of Matthew Moody and sons, but head stock and carriage 'ne match pas'.

                          Your picture of the tail stock seems to show a slot cut on the back to allow clamping of the slide. To me that would suggest Jerry's 'frankenlathe' hypothesis.

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                          • #14
                            I'm in the same boat with my big all cast iron wood bandsaw. It was made for only a couple of years as a new direction by a Canadian foundry in Quebec. It didn't catch on and the outfit went on to other pursuits or just folded. So me and maybe 50 folks in the world are now the caretakers of a saw of which there were only a few hundred ever made.

                            It may be that you and the other two folks are in the same situation.

                            You and the fellow that JTier's found are both located back east. What about the third fellow? If they were a very limited production and the outfit folded before striking the market big I can see where the first run that was sold off during the liquidation of assets might stay in the same geographical region. THAT might be a clue to work with. It would also explain the lack of information on the Lathes of the World web site.

                            I don't think it's a "bitsa" lathe since the main parts of any lathe are all highly reliant on each other. Any metal lathe is going to be a well thought out product if it has any chance at all. That's not to say that some designer at the company didn't find it easy to take their inspiration from shapes that were already well known in the market place. And that use of well known shapes could be why all of us are saying that different angles look like this or that lathe. But they would not be parts taken directly from other makers and put together.

                            A search for "bankrupt metal machining companies east coast usa" would not be a bad first search phrase to start the investigation.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              I'm NOT buying into the "Frankenlathe" theory..... I'm against it.

                              With two widely separated examples, each having the same odd features, it seems unlikely. The odd headstock.... the weird bed.... tailstock with that hole in it for no apparent reason..... two bosses on the crosslide. That's the SAME odd features on two machines, with one odd feature on each of the major parts of the lathe....?

                              Nope, strains the imagination too far to imagine two folks putting the same thing together independently.

                              Now, if perhaps it was a kit machine? Possibly so.... Or as mentioned, someone's failed product that was made only in one small batch, that's quite possible. There are not very many Minton milling machines around, but there are some. All the odd features seem to bevery possible for a crackpot inventor who didn't know much about what people expected to see in a lathe, or perhaps had some "better ideas" that he believed in even if they hurt sales ("People just didn't understand how much BETTER it was").

                              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                              .....
                              You and the fellow that JTier's found are both located back east. What about the third fellow? .......

                              A search for "bankrupt metal machining companies east coast usa" would not be a bad first search phrase to start the investigation.
                              I don't know that Missouri counts as "back east" unless you are in the far West.... it's a long way to New Jersey from here.
                              Last edited by J Tiers; 02-28-2017, 06:54 PM.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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