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  • #46
    Originally posted by alanganes View Post
    You are correct, they are not for the lathe, but things like that indexing head are pretty versatile and not necessarily machine specific. They can be used with most any mill or grinder. I would not necessarily be in a hurry to unload them if they were mine. Unless you really need the room or the money raised from selling them, you may want to just sit on them for a bit until you get feel for what they can be used for.

    Overall you did pretty well for 200 bucks, I think. That looks like a really stout machine for a 10" lathe. I'm guessing you have easily gotten $200 worth of fun messing with it already.
    Yea,I figured a few items may be adaptable. They're just out of my league to fully understand the possibilities at this time. I'm in no rush to sell them, but if someone was actually in need of them, I would entertain offers.

    I've been more then happy with the operation of the lathe so far (note the original post date, this is an older thread) and have definitely got my money's worth out of it.


    Another update kind of since we're here. The excessive backlash in the cross slide was annoying me (I believe it was in excess of .015" if I remember correctly). So, I tore it apart and found the screw is 1/2x10tpi acme rod. The nut is part of the lower plate section and "non serviceable". So after thinking of my options, I found a brass t nut on eBay relatively cheap, turned it down, and bored the old threads out of the cross slide plate. Used some red thread lock and pressed the new nut in, and just to be sure it wouldn't move, drilled and tapped 2 holes to hold the flange. Backlash is now only .001", huge improvement.




    It may not be pretty, and the screws don't match... But it sure works good!

    Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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    • #47
      Unfortunately I've come to the conclusion that none of the fixtures are for my lathe. Likely most are for the m head Bridgeport that the guy had for sale also. So, they sit in a box in my garage until I can 100% confirm what they are so I can sell them to someone that can use them.

      Well this sounds like you need to start looking for a Bridgeport, not selling the tooling. And as has been said it is likely that most of it can be used on a lot of different machines. And I too thought you had at least one index head and tailstock. And I agree ,you got a heck of a deal, you should be smiling.
      Last edited by wdtom44; 04-11-2018, 10:51 AM.

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      • #48
        I sure wouldn't be in any hurry to sell the stuff either. If you do much machining you're going to end up with SOME sort of mill in due time. And the other tooling will come into its own at that time. Note that you don't need it to be a Bridgeport. The indexing head would work with any mill. It's a stand alone solution in that respect. Heck, it could even be used on a drill press for evenly spaced holes around a part you rotate with the indexing head if the table was large enough to hold it all. Or similarly you could remove the rising T from the carriage and set the whole shebang on the lathe with a suitable adapter for some sort of operations.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #49
          Originally posted by foxmxrcer View Post
          Yea,I figured a few items may be adaptable. They're just out of my league to fully understand the possibilities at this time. I'm in no rush to sell them, but if someone was actually in need of them, I would entertain offers.
          You may be surprised at how quickly your "league" will rise to the point where you'll find uses for stuff like that. And thanks for the additional update, you did a nice job on solving the worn out threads on your cross slide. Nothing "un-pretty" about that, it's a perfectly workable approach that obviously solved the issue you were having.

          And thanks for sharing your work here, I really enjoy seeing the projects that people do. I find it inspiring and interesting to see all of the different approaches we take to solve problems. So many ways to skin all of those proverbial cats.

          Nice job!

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          • #50
            Originally posted by alanganes View Post
            You may be surprised at how quickly your "league" will rise to the point where you'll find uses for stuff like that. And thanks for the additional update, you did a nice job on solving the worn out threads on your cross slide. Nothing "un-pretty" about that, it's a perfectly workable approach that obviously solved the issue you were having.

            And thanks for sharing your work here, I really enjoy seeing the projects that people do. I find it inspiring and interesting to see all of the different approaches we take to solve problems. So many ways to skin all of those proverbial cats.

            Nice job!
            I dunno.... I think the mismatched screws needs further attention.... But at least he used slot head screws to keep it period correct....

            I gotta agree that it's great to see an old machine of this sort brought back to a useful life. It would be a lot of fun to work with a machine like that to get a taste of what it was like back when this style of machine was state of the art.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #51
              Originally posted by alanganes View Post
              You may be surprised at how quickly your "league" will rise to the point where you'll find uses for stuff like that. And thanks for the additional update, you did a nice job on solving the worn out threads on your cross slide. Nothing "un-pretty" about that, it's a perfectly workable approach that obviously solved the issue you were having.

              And thanks for sharing your work here, I really enjoy seeing the projects that people do. I find it inspiring and interesting to see all of the different approaches we take to solve problems. So many ways to skin all of those proverbial cats.

              Nice job!
              Thank you, I'll try to keep updating as I go. I just ordered a cheap cash register style drawer to replace the counter top tool shelf I made. Going to make and attach a collet rack on the rear of it as well.


              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
              I dunno.... I think the mismatched screws needs further attention.... But at least he used slot head screws to keep it period correct....

              I gotta agree that it's great to see an old machine of this sort brought back to a useful life. It would be a lot of fun to work with a machine like that to get a taste of what it was like back when this style of machine was state of the art.
              Those are the only screws I had that were small enough for the job at 2am haha. I was more angry that I didn't have a matching pair (I spent about a half hour searching). And as I was screwing them in, I DID think to myself "huh, I guess the flat heads will at least match the lathe...". And, (except for you internet people), I'm the only one that knows what it looks like, as it's hidden under the cross slide!

              Originally the plan was to turn off the flange of the t nut and just rely on the press for/thread lock, but I wound up leaving it for added security.

              Now I need to get around to making the backing plate for my 6" 3 jaw. The 4 jaw on it now works fine, but the previous owner clearly crashed into it, drilled it, or did something to it because some of the Jaws are nicked pretty bad and makes holding shallow it small diameter pieces difficult/impossible. How hard are chuck Jaws? Would I be able to close them all the way, and face them level again? I'll try to find a picture of the damage.

              Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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              • #52





                "When ordering parts for this chuck mention 8 inch IXL 199"

                Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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                • #53
                  This is only of passing interest, but here is the IXL page on the UK lathes site. http://www.lathes.co.uk/ixl/

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                  • #54
                    I think you said that the taper end to the spindle isn't removable, and is part of the spindle. Looking closely at the photos, your spindle end is different to most, which have a slightly raised register, about 3/8" long after the thread, and then a shoulder for the chuck back plate to screw up against. The purpose of the register (the backplate should be bored to be a close fit on it) is to keep the chuck concentric each time it is screweed on and off, and the shoulder is to keep the chuck aligned. Now your spindle doesn't have these features, but it does have that taper cone, which I believe was P&W's method of doing the same job. You will need to machine a matching conical bore in the backplate, so that when the chuck is screwed on, the backplate seats on that cone. If done properly, that should ensure concentricty and alignment.
                    In answer to something you said in an early posting, no, you can't (or shouldn't) simply swap chucks over on the same backplate. Each chuck will have a recess in the back, for the backplate to seat into, as a really good light push fit. Its highly unlikely that a 4 jaw and 3 jaw will have the same size recess. Once a chuck has been properly fitted to its backplate, it doesn't routinely, get takien off again except occasionaly when the chuck is dismantled for cleaning purposes.

                    Apologies if you knew all this already
                    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                    • #55
                      Someone previously sure did mess up those jaws. At least part of it looks more like the piece jumped ship during turning and snapped a piece out of the end of the jaw.

                      The jaws SHOULD be pretty hard. Unlikely you're going to be able to turn them back to true. Most such work seems to be more about using a spider to hold the jaws so they can be ground back to true. But on a four jaw it's not the end of the world if the jaws are not all identical. So perhaps pulling the jaws out and working then back into shape could be an option. But it's one that needs to be done with great care. You still want the insides to end up square to the guide slots in the jaws and the noses to all be the same length. And to me that pretty well sings out "surface grinder" which you don't have. Or some sort of clever jig to allow you to do much the same job with a home made jig and bench grinder.

                      "Hard turning" would be another option with the suitable carbide tooling. But it's rough on the machine at the same time. I'm not sure the old rise and fall cross slide would like the beating that this would entail. Most "hard machining" I've seen being done is with solid carbide end mills on the big milling machines.... which you don't have... yet.....
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #56
                        I got my collets today! Good news, they are in fact 5p. Not so good (but not bad) news, the lot with the arbors, only one of the centers (the bottom one in the picture) is 5p, the rest are 5v (Van Norman #5). They are a bit longer and fatter, and the thread pitch is wrong. A quick eBay search tells me they aren't very easy to come by either.

                        Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by foxmxrcer View Post
                          I got my collets today! Good news, they are in fact 5p. Not so good (but not bad) news, the lot with the arbors, only one of the centers (the bottom one in the picture) is 5p, the rest are 5v (Van Norman #5). They are a bit longer and fatter, and the thread pitch is wrong. A quick eBay search tells me they aren't very easy to come by either.

                          Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk
                          I'll take the Van Norman crap off your hands.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                            I'll take the Van Norman crap off your hands.
                            [emoji23] PM me an offer if you actually have a use for them. You can pretty well see what they look like in the pics above, but if you want more I can send them.

                            Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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                            • #59
                              Your lathe looks very stout for 10” swing, you’ll enjoy it when it’s up and running. Looks like a South Bend 9c on Jose Conseco’s steroids.

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                              • #60
                                Very HD! Is this your's with a threading dial in Feb http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=77&t=190773

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