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  • Buyer's remorse????

    I didn't want to hijack Dan the chemist's post about his new shaper.
    So, how many have had buyer's remorse after buying a machine, and how long did it last?
    I know in my own case, the buyer's remorse I've had was about the machine/ tooling I DIDN'T buy!

    TC
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

  • #2
    Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
      Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.
      LOL !

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      • #4
        Never, always wish they had more. Now moving it all home remorse, that's different!

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        • #5
          No remorse, but I did pass up on a really good deal a few months ago. A Kurt D688 vise complete with 10 pairs of aluminum jaws, plexiglass
          shield, handle, and speed handle showed up on craigslist for $60. I was very tempted until I looked up the specs. My current vise hangs about
          6.5 inches off of the table. The Kurt is 2 inches longer. They list the shipping weight as 80 pounds. Between the larger footprint and the
          weight I figured it might be a bit much for my round column mill.
          Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RichR View Post
            No remorse, but I did pass up on a really good deal a few months ago. A Kurt D688 vise complete with 10 pairs of aluminum jaws, plexiglass
            shield, handle, and speed handle showed up on craigslist for $60. I was very tempted until I looked up the specs. My current vise hangs about
            6.5 inches off of the table. The Kurt is 2 inches longer. They list the shipping weight as 80 pounds. Between the larger footprint and the
            weight I figured it might be a bit much for my round column mill.
            You would just have to buy a bigger mill!
            David Kaiser
            “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
            ― Robert A. Heinlein

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
              Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.
              lol, great cure, get focused on the next buy! It is a strange brain chemistry thing.....I don't need anything more, but there's prospects out there that have got me excited like a little kid the day before Christmas.

              Where I need to have a serious meeting with myself, is about not buying any more projects!
              .

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              • #8
                I have had it many times. It usually goes away after I get it home, and start fixing it up. The remorse does stay if the machine ends up being in a lot worse shape than I thought, or if I find something the seller forgot to mention(like a broken casting).

                1 machine come to mind.

                Marvel 4b power hacksaw-great saw if it was in the condition the seller said it was. Took it all apart to clean and one of the main castings that has a sliding way was cracked in 2 and has a bad braze job. Something you couldn't spot unless it was in pieces and can probably only happen from dropping the saw.

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                • #9
                  My buyer's remorse is like Tim's. I go to a lot of auctions, so I normally figure out what my limit is before I go. I'll often think, after I'm home, I should have bid one more time on that lot. My last case of buyer's remorse was when I went to pick up a lathe I had agreed to buy. He had a bunch of other tooling as well. I picked up a nice 8" super spacer and some extra chucks for the lathe. He had a 24" troyke rotory table I should have made an offer on. Still wish to this day I had made him an offer for it.

                  Hello, my name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic
                  -brian

                  Hello, my name is brian and I'm a toolaholic.

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                  • #10
                    Months and years later.
                    When I realize things like "this POS Asian mill is sloppy in more axes than there are ways to fix it!".
                    Spend what it takes to get something that will perform longer than you will and you'll never have buyer's remorse.
                    Len

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                    • #11
                      Just once when I realized that the dial on the knee axis on the Chicom 6x26 mill I bought new had no relation to inches or cm. in fact it has no relation to anything normal.
                      The mill was out of warranty when I realized the problem.
                      I fixed that by installing a 4 axis DRO.
                      Thats what I get for buying Chicom tools.
                      Other thaen that it's OK.
                      Bill
                      Last edited by Seastar; 03-04-2017, 12:57 PM.
                      I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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                      • #12
                        Hi Group,

                        I may not call it remorse but I bought a 15x40 gear head Asian lathe with a mill which is what I really wanted. In 5yrs I didn't even wire it up and use it, so I finally sold it to a good friend who's REALLY HAPPY!! I guess what I'm saying is I have remorse that l should have done this sooner since it wasn't in use and I made someone else so grateful.

                        TX
                        Mr fixit for the family
                        Chris.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Like Q, my only regrets came years later.

                          Like Dan's post, I picked up a shaper when one came available, in large part thanks to the hosannas sung of such things on this board. At the time, I had the floor space, I thought the machines were cool, and I had a few minutes of free time that I figured could be put towards repairing it.

                          In the intervening ten years, however, my business has expanded considerably, and moved somewhat away from the onesey-twosey hand-made part into the short-run production batch. And IN that ten years, I have had exactly one job in which the shaper was ideally- or at least usefully- suited.

                          Thanks to HSM-pressured old-iron disease, I eventually wound up with two shapers (big and little) along with a 'camelback' drill, a valve grinder I've now had for ten years and used exactly once, an antique surface grinder I was partway through rebuilding before I acquired a much newer and far more ready-to-go one, and finally a large gearhead lathe that has so far been a three-plus-year rebuild project, has cost me nearly $5k in parts and tooling, and is now far larger than I need or have room for.

                          Now, I'm in desperate need of floor space for some small CNC machines I hope to be able to buy before too long, but I'm stuck with the old crap. I can't give the shapers away- except to the scrappers, who with today's prices will give me about 8-1/2 cents for them- and I haven't tried unloading the Camelback, but I can bet I'll be stuck with that, too, or at best only able to get a few bucks for it, and even then only to somebody who wants it for a decoration.

                          I, too, hate to see the old machines scrapped. The big shaper has thus far survived some 112 years, and I'd rather not be the one to finally junk it. Ditto the old drill. But at the moment they're basically useless, and taking up a nontrivial amount of ever more valuable room.

                          Doc.
                          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                          • #14
                            Valve grinders, I have 2 complete valve & seat grinder sets & now that I don't work on antique planes & the world has gone replace not repair I can't hardly give them away. But they've paid for themselves.

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                            • #15
                              I have some regret about buying a lathe first and not a mill. But then again if I would have probably missed the lathe if I would have started with a mill.
                              I bought into the story that you can do everything on a lathe, but the story didn't mention that milling on a lathe is for people with more time than I have.

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