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Quetion for the Brits about paint.

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  • Quetion for the Brits about paint.

    Reading old Model Engineer mags usually has quotes about the paint they used for models IE:cellulose paint. Is that just an oil based lacquer or is it something else altogether.
    Last edited by loose nut; 03-06-2017, 06:50 PM.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

  • #2
    No cellulose paint is a solvent based paint.
    It's what they use to paint cars with before 2 pack and water based paints came out. you just need paint and cellulose thinners.
    Best the apply by spray as it dries very fast.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Sounds like what we yanks call a Solvent-based Nitrocellulose lacquer or just lacquer. Not to be confused with water base lacquer.

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      • #4
        OK thanks
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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        • #5
          The cellulose thinners are a solvent and used to be used in paints, the idea being that the paint is a liquid and when applied the cellulose thinners solvent will evaporate leaving the paint to harden, it isn't really used anymore because of the fumes which are not good for you or the environment, water base paints are a two pack system which is a paint and a hardener, and the hardener is isocyanate based so you have to wear full suits and masks or you will get cyanide poisoning

          Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by scooterist007 View Post
            The cellulose thinners are a solvent and used to be used in paints, the idea being that the paint is a liquid and when applied the cellulose thinners solvent will evaporate leaving the paint to harden, it isn't really used anymore because of the fumes which are not good for you or the environment, water base paints are a two pack system which is a paint and a hardener, and the hardener is isocyanate based so you have to wear full suits and masks or you will get cyanide poisoning

            Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk
            That's a really incomplete history, even this is an inadequate synopsis - oils (brushed, then hot-pot spraying ;-))preceded nitrocellulose ,air dry acrylics followed Nitrocellulose. Then 2 Pack Polyurethanes (2K) prevailed, water based don't yet perform as well as 2K as evidenced by the atrocious orange peel finishes on current production cars and the vulnerability of water based paints to damage from relatively short term contact with bird poo - something which should render any automotive finish not fit for purpose.
            If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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            • #7
              During World War I, the Dreyfus brothers in the USA supplied cellulose acetate dope for painting fabric covered fighter aircraft. When the war ended, they found themselves with a dope factory and no market for their product. They developed the ability to spin the dope into fiber using a solution spinning technique they created. Their company became Celanese, which still produces cellulose acetate. Possibily the largest market for cellulose acetate is for cigarette filters. The brilliant satin fabric from some woven acetate is popular for wedding dresses and casket liners.

              Jim Williams

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              • #8
                Really old tins of celly paint are dangerous, I opened a tin and it exploded, frightened the **** out of me as you don't expect paint to go bang (racing green btw.)
                I think it's still a good paint besides the VOC being as high as you can get, spend a few hours spraying it and you get fairly high too, esp if you add cyclohexane to stop silicone reaction ( pears in a bottle)
                Probably cancerous as a bonus
                Mark
                Btw the old rolls royces used "coach paint" the coating was soft, the sprayer showed me, you could leave a thumb nail print in it

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
                  That's a really incomplete history, even this is an inadequate synopsis - oils (brushed, then hot-pot spraying ;-))preceded nitrocellulose ,air dry acrylics followed Nitrocellulose. Then 2 Pack Polyurethanes (2K) prevailed, water based don't yet perform as well as 2K as evidenced by the atrocious orange peel finishes on current production cars and the vulnerability of water based paints to damage from relatively short term contact with bird poo - something which should render any automotive finish not fit for purpose.
                  I wasn't intending to give a complete history, I was giving a brief introduction to what the op asked for, also I wasn't even suggesting that 2k was a adequate replacement for cellulose, I didn't introduce the ban! The history of paints is a large and diverse range and something that isn't going to be explained in a few words

                  Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

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                  • #10
                    So what is a good replacement for painting models (model engineering models IE: metals, not the plastic kit stuff) in a home shop that has the same look as a good lacquer. Humbrol paint is a good enamel, is there anything better for this.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                    • #11
                      I think enamel has always been the preferred choice. People only used cellulose because it was readily available in spray cans and didn't have spray sets.

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