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Photo heavy welding turntable

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  • Photo heavy welding turntable

    Hi Everyone,

    Over the years I have been scrounging items for a welding turntable. I finally started construction last October and finished it enough for its first use about 2 weeks ago. Here it is in an import engine stand that I modified years ago to make it adjustable for height:





    First job:



    Decades ago, my dad gave me this 41 pound chunk of cast aluminum that he was going use for the body of a dividing head he hoped to build:



    It was about 11 inch O.D. X 5 inches thick and quite rough.

    This thread is going to show a bunch setups and hoops I had to jump through to arrive at the finished tool so more is on the way...................................
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

    Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

  • #2
    Because the top and bottom were not flat this was the first step to get something to hold securely:



    This next view shows the end of the threaded drawbar I used to be sure it couldn't fly out of the chuck:



    Once I got a smooth, round diameter and flat face I could turn it around like so:



    This view also showed the clamping plate I made for things just like this. Its much more rigid than a toolpost.

    Because I got a great deal on a pair of large taper roller bearings I needed to have both bores be in alignment. Soooooo, I turned the O.D. like a spool so I could have a face to line up when I flipped it around to finish bore the opposite side:



    Next I set it up in the mill to cut two notches in case I ever need to remove the races...................................next post......................
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

    Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

    Comment


    • #3


      30 pounds of chips and two days later:



      At one place I had worked we had a turntable that was shop made with just a chuck mounted on a shaft - no through hole. I decided that if I ever made one for myself it would have a hollow spindle. These roller bearings have a 3-1/2 inch bore so my spindle has a 3 inch bore:



      That outta do it!

      Next I made the adjusting nut from some 1.25 plate I had on hand. The hole that was already there proved to make boring it go slower!



      To save time, I roughed the corners off in the mill before turning the O.D. ..................... next post.............
      Best wishes to ya’ll.

      Sincerely,

      Jim

      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

      Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

      Comment


      • #4
        Before taking it out of the lathe, I faced one side to leave a rough circle to act as a pattern to follow for the end mill:



        Cranking both leadscrews by hand I took the full corner off in one cut ----- slowly:



        Then it was back to the lathe for finishing. Years ago I used to run a job and I made these soft jaws. They come in handy for things like this when I want to have the entire thread finished to size and not have to worry about hitting the chuck or its jaws:



        Flipping the jaws allowed me to hold the spindle securely w/o the need for a steady rest:



        Then I could finish the end to accept a flange for the chuck. This time I bought a 1 inch thick CRS round from Interstate Metals when I was in town. The time saved was worth it!!!
        Last edited by jhe.1973; 05-16-2017, 01:05 AM.
        Best wishes to ya’ll.

        Sincerely,

        Jim

        "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

        "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

        Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

        Comment


        • #5


          I welded it on from both sides just to be safe:



          I started this project undecided if I would drive the spindle with chain, belt or gears. I rummaged around and decided to use these gears once I calculated the speed I would end up with. This was the first mock-up:



          I only(?) had to cut the big gear. The smaller two came from a Harley engine. The larger of the two drove the generator and the smaller one is one of the cams. These are case hardened for very long life - I've never seen one wear through the hard surface. I used one of the gears as a template and ground a tool bit by hand for a flycutter. This view is the second setup I tried. Because of the intermittent cut the first setup wasn't rigid enough:



          I have two indicators set so I could monitor the bore and face to show if anything was moving. Then I messed up the spacing and had to turn the teeth off. They weren't too deep, so IIRC I went from 130 teeth to 120.
          Last edited by jhe.1973; 03-06-2017, 11:21 PM. Reason: Korrekted speeling
          Best wishes to ya’ll.

          Sincerely,

          Jim

          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

          Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

          Comment


          • #6
            Even this last setup proved to not be able to hold the blank solidly. I ended up drilling four 1/2 inch holes in the blank, made an aluminum adapter to butt up against the Hardinge dog driver and hold it all with a stout drawbar:



            This finally worked well and I could finish the teeth. You also saw my highly refined 'coolant' system? I had made that years ago for a lathe job I ran and it worked well there also. Oh yeah, also notice the white out on the correct holes in the index. One screw up was enough!

            Here I was turning the cam lobe off after softening it:



            This is my method for keeping the gear teeth hard while heating the hub:



            Not much water is needed. I think this can is from olives and the gear hub is heated to not quite red hot right in the water. Once this gear was finished I could mock-up the components more solidly using my fab table:



            This allowed me to get some dimensions for making the motor & gearbox mount........................next post.................
            Last edited by jhe.1973; 11-02-2019, 02:05 AM. Reason: Made speeling betterrer
            Best wishes to ya’ll.

            Sincerely,

            Jim

            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

            Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

            Comment


            • #7
              I love it when a plan comes together.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

              Comment


              • #8
                That last mock-up was when I realized that I could make this assembly more compact by flipping the worm gear over. Making the motor/gear drive mounting plate gave me a better view of how I could mount the motor assembly to spindle housing:



                I saw that if I cut this flat, I could fairly easily adapt the spindle housing to the drive assembly:



                This enabled me to set up a solid means of getting some accurate dimensions to make a CAD drawing:



                By accurately laying out the angles needed and carefully cutting to the scribe lines I could position the mounting flanges to this piece for welding. I also have two adjustable parallels inside to support the sides so they are more solid while milling:



                ..........................................
                Last edited by jhe.1973; 03-07-2017, 03:03 AM.
                Best wishes to ya’ll.

                Sincerely,

                Jim

                "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Paul! Glad to 'see' you again. I can't get here too often so I am trying to make the best of it right now.

                  Here are the two components fixed together:



                  To make the bracket to hold the idler gear, I first lined up the rotary table with the milling spindle and then scribed two lines at the correct distance in the aluminum sub-plate fastened to the surface. Then, all I had to do was make sure that the odd shaped chunk I grabbed from my scrap pile covered those lines:



                  First trial fit:



                  This bracket is slotted in case I wish to try a smaller gear on the worm drive. The meshing is set just like change gearing on a lathe.

                  Next came an outboard support for the idler and some cosmetic cleaning up:



                  Notice also the use of a different sub-plate for mounting the housing in the rotab..................
                  Best wishes to ya’ll.

                  Sincerely,

                  Jim

                  "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                  "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                  Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is a brush for transferring the welding current directly to the spindle inside the housing between - not through - the bearings:



                    The slot on the right has a spring to keep contact with the spindle. I figured that a brass end would be less likely to score then if I had just used the aluminum. Here is how it looks before the housing is bolted up:



                    While I was going through all this work I bored and fitted a faceplate I got at a yard sale years ago. This will let me utilize the gigantic through hole if I ever need to:



                    Just realized that I didn't show the DC motor controller and foot switch:



                    Whew! Its 2:30 AM.................WAY past my bedtime.................but its good to be back here for awhile!!
                    Last edited by jhe.1973; 03-05-2017, 04:31 AM.
                    Best wishes to ya’ll.

                    Sincerely,

                    Jim

                    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                    Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jim
                      A powerfully well built beast, like the through hole myself, soon your robot army will have functional hips so world domination is at least one step closer, (the ball weld to stup thingy, your secrets out now)
                      I was a dick head, all the giant ball bearings I coulda Shulda retrieved out the bins in work ( thing rolling mill for size,) now I wanted 2 X 2" diameter recently to discover I nowhaveto buy them, $60 ea is the cheapest so far, mad, oh for a tidy scrap yard.
                      A swivel is handy for back argon ( or cheaper co2, argon is expensive) as are roller stands.
                      We had some pipes to tig in work, one of the welders decided the brand new pipe threader as a positioner, ruins were dumped in a in bin andbuiried under chips so I wouldent find it, they worked hard at it too, my office had a window into the shop and out to the yard, I preferred the view outside so usually spent staring into space time looking out, where the whole ghastly burial was witnessed.
                      I asked where the threader was next week to have a blank look, what threader?, the new one I said
                      Dunno, didn't know we had one was the reply.
                      I had recovered it and sent it to get it repaired, new bearings and a motor, it came back with a sign engraved in Formica fixed on "dai, this is a pipe threader, not a pipe rotater, it is not designed to conduct 200 Amps, nor does it like to be buried alive, unless your threading tube, hands off"
                      He was impressed
                      Btw, I once saw a rotator/positioner that had been built using the table stand off an industrial sewing machine, what was interesting was rotation was knee paddle controlled, which was infinitely variable allowing both pedal and rotate speed control while sitting, there was some Morgan chrome blanket to protect the operator as well, handy tig welding pipe fittings on thin tubes.
                      Well done, nice photos, if creating a machine = aqquireing a machine then you have earned many you sucks, I guess about 1 Decisuck, (10 you suck, exchange rates may vary, Eurosucks are worthless, Trumpsucks are going up and 1 clintonsuck gets you impeached)
                      Mark

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you for posting your project. I have learned new machining work holding techniques and how to layout and plan the assembly of many components. Great build and it should last many lifetime.
                        Cheers!
                        Phil

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jhe.1973 View Post
                          .......but its good to be back here for awhile!!
                          Glad to have you "back". Thanks for sharing. Nicely done and documented.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm impressed. It show quality craftsmanship.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What a build! Nice job!

                              The one thing I would be just a tiny bit concerned about is the brush set up. From the looks the brush makes metal contact with the housing/base of the unit and then I assume the end contacts the spindle? If the end doesn't transmit the ground 100% for some reason the current may try to still pass threw the housing/bearings to the ground. Some of the best grounding methods I have seen isolate the ground strap/brush from the housing of the unit so no stray voltage can pass threw the bearings.
                              Andy

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