Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Setting up EMC2 on PC.........??

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • skunkworks
    replied
    Oh - good eye! (no clue about the naming.. )

    Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
    The ad says "Beagle Bone Green," top left section. (Not that I know what the heck that is!) Who names this stuff anyway?

    Leave a comment:


  • DICKEYBIRD
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    BTW - it looks like they are using the beablebone black as the motion controller... (someone on the linuxcnc email list noticed it)

    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12857

    interesting.

    sam
    The ad says "Beagle Bone Green," top left section. (Not that I know what the heck that is!) Who names this stuff anyway?

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    BTW - it looks like they are using the beablebone black as the motion controller... (someone on the linuxcnc email list noticed it)

    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12857

    interesting.

    sam

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    Sure - and it does make sense that you would want to stay compatible.. (and sticking with what you know)

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    Cool.

    "Centroid Pro CNC" software $99 (#14457)
    "Centroid Ultimate CNC" software $499 (#14458)
    Optional Factory Direct Technical Support: $90/hr.

    Just for comparison..

    https://mesaus.com/index.php?route=p...&product_id=66

    $199
    -Ethernet
    -5 Axis of step &dir step motor or servo motor drives
    -spindle encoder interface (ttl/differential)
    -48 isolated I/O - 5V through 28V
    -Expandable
    -Linuxcnc free

    sam
    sam, good point.......

    In my case, acorn plus the $499 software package, plus software scaling option ($100?). Just short of $1000.

    A thousand bucks is a thousand bucks....in the whole scheme of things that's barely a consideration. The biggest advantage for me is compatibility with my existing Centroid system. I have a dozen or so complicated 4 axis programs written in macro language, repeat jobs that could be interchanged between machines. Also hoping my Centroid probe will work on acorn, that was around $1500.

    Coincidentally, since I started this thread I've run across two casual acquaintances who're running Linuxcnc. I will take a hard look at their setups and acorn before I do anything. My schedule is around mid to late summer so no big rush.

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    Cool.

    "Centroid Pro CNC" software $99 (#14457)
    "Centroid Ultimate CNC" software $499 (#14458)
    Optional Factory Direct Technical Support: $90/hr.

    Just for comparison..

    https://mesaus.com/index.php?route=p...&product_id=66

    $199
    -Ethernet
    -5 Axis of step &dir step motor or servo motor drives
    -spindle encoder interface (ttl/differential)
    -48 isolated I/O - 5V through 28V
    -Expandable
    -Linuxcnc free

    sam

    Leave a comment:


  • DICKEYBIRD
    replied
    Well it appears that Centroid is now accepting orders for the Acorn: http://www.centroidcnc.com/centroid_...ontroller.html Cool, I'll be raiding the piggy bank soon!

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    Again - good luck. I hope it works out to your expectations.

    (my $DayJob$ has 2 centroid controlled cnc's - they seem to like them but I don't think they are using them to their potential..)

    sam

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    OOPS, I missed that.

    As of now, pending exact details of the acorn board, I'm still thinking Centroid. Mainly because I'm very familiar with the control, have a desk simulator for the control, and a probe that may interface with the board. And, Centroid being on windows to easily use my software on the same machine.

    Thanks to you though, I know there's a workable option for me if the Centroid is a dud.

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    Sure - the first link in my previous post..

    logic expressions can be formulated with boolean operators ( AND, OR, XOR, and the comparison operators EQ,NE,GT,GE,LT,LE)

    ATAN[arg]/[arg] Four quadrant inverse tangent

    ABS[arg] Absolute value

    ACOS[arg] Inverse cosine

    ASIN[arg] Inverse sine

    COS[arg] Cosine

    EXP[arg] e raised to the given power

    FIX[arg] Round down to integer

    FUP[arg] Round up to integer

    ROUND[arg] Round to nearest integer

    LN[arg] Base-e logarithm

    SIN[arg] Sine

    SQRT[arg] Square Root

    TAN[arg] Tangent

    EXISTS[arg] Check named Parameter


    Originally posted by DR View Post
    Sam,

    This is good stuff to know, thanks. As I said, a lot of these capabilities weren't obvious in the time I initially spent looking over linuxcnc. It's a considerably better system than I realized.

    How about the mathematical operators, sin, cos, etc?

    My reason for asking about the capabilities is some work I've been doing lately where it's easier to develop the tool paths in gcode using rotations, scaling and math operators than it is to actually draw the parts in CAD and then CAM the model. Instead of huge gcode files you get nice compact, easily modified pieces of gcode. One part with a CAD model was like a unicorn horn, hand coded in about 40 to 50 lines of gcode, instead of tens of thousands of lines when I used CAM on the CAD model.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Sam,

    This is good stuff to know, thanks. As I said, a lot of these capabilities weren't obvious in the time I initially spent looking over linuxcnc. It's a considerably better system than I realized.

    How about the mathematical operators, sin, cos, etc?

    My reason for asking about the capabilities is some work I've been doing lately where it's easier to develop the tool paths in gcode using rotations, scaling and math operators than it is to actually draw the parts in CAD and then CAM the model. Instead of huge gcode files you get nice compact, easily modified pieces of gcode. One part with a CAD model was like a unicorn horn, hand coded in about 40 to 50 lines of gcode, instead of tens of thousands of lines when I used CAM on the CAD model.

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    Sure -
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/gc...code:functions

    Here are some example programs using loops and conditionals also..

    http://wiki.linuxcnc.org/cgi-bin/wiki.pl?Oword

    Here is a simple G18 arc rotated.. (you can see the Gcode)





    Originally posted by DR View Post
    Sam,

    Thanks for the info. I missed the coordinate rotation (buried in G10) when I previously looked over the Gcode listing.

    I'll see if I can find and post a short bit of Centroid code in the next day or so. It has arcs in the XZ plane with coordinate rotation around the Z axis, I'm curious if that can be run in linuxcnc.

    With user variables can you perform mathematical operations, sin, cos, etc, in addition to +,-,*,/,^?

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    FWIW, I finally got my kflop installed with he Konnect IO expansion board. So far it runs well. Having a couple little programming bugs. Something wrong in my spindle program and home program with Mach3. But other than that it runs smooth.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Sam,

    Thanks for the info. I missed the coordinate rotation (buried in G10) when I previously looked over the Gcode listing.

    I'll see if I can find and post a short bit of Centroid code in the next day or so. It has arcs in the XZ plane with coordinate rotation around the Z axis, I'm curious if that can be run in linuxcnc.

    With user variables can you perform mathematical operations, sin, cos, etc, in addition to +,-,*,/,^?

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    linuxcnc
    Complete manual
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/

    overview
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/gcode/overview.html

    gcodes
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/gcode/g-code.html

    mcodes
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/gcode/m-code.html

    owords
    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/2.7/html/gcode/o-code.html

    coordinate rotation.. (implements it in the G10)



    Originally posted by DR View Post
    Sam,

    Is rigid tapping free, what about the spindle encoder? You have input for it as does the acorn.

    The price is not really the major issue IMO.

    Go to this site:

    http://www.helmancnc.com/centroid-m-code-cnc-mill/

    Download the manual or just look at the G & M codes available on that site. Especially look at G68, coordinate rotation as standard, a very powerful feature. Chapter eleven of the manual describes system and user variables you have access to in a programs. My point is the full Centroid control is loaded with features usually not found in this price range.


    On edit: I totally forgot to mention the Centroid Intercon programming system. You can draw parts and program from the drawing not to mention the canned cycles.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X