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1-wheel cut knurling tool

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  • 1-wheel cut knurling tool

    I promised to show some photos trying to illustrate the usage of my cut knurling tool. I don't have any dimensions as I just dig up some good looking pieces of steel and started to machine. I think anyone can figure their own version with possible improvements and I am happy to help if there something mystery.

    These are the main parts:



    Knurling tool set to toolpost, mounting shaft angled approx 5-degrees in the tool post to create relief angle for the cutting edge:
    (In this picture the Knurling tool set to cut the second cut of the diamond pattern, lathe run in reverse)



    Centering the knurling tool to workpiece with ruler method:



    Position for cutting lathe spinning in normal direction:



    Rest of the photos are here:
    http://imgur.com/a/nzkag

    You really need to flush the tool with coolant or use constant air blast to blow of all the chips so that they don't mangle between the tool and workpiece.

  • #2
    The knurling wheel is "normal" Zeus knurling wheel that I sharpened and polished on both sides:
    https://www.zeus-tooling.de/de.html

    Only critical dimension in my "desing" is that the knurling tool cutting edge is in a same line with the long mounting shaft center axis. This way you don't need to repeat the height adjustment when you flip the tool to cut the second cut of the diamond pattern.

    I was also pondering on the possibility to make cutting wheel position adjustable so that If I ever need to sharpen the knurling wheel and it becomes thinner I could still adjust the cutting edge position correctly. Should be reasonably easy modification if need rises.

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    • #3
      Well done, I like it! I made a simple single wheel knurling tool a while ago, to use in my Rivett lathe, and due to the versatility of the weird-o toolpost on the lathe, it lends itself to cut knurling very well. I have only used it for straight knurls, and for some reason it never occurred to me to angle it and make two different cuts, for diamond knurls! Brilliant. I'll have to give that a try the next time I have call for it.
      Max
      http://joyofprecision.com/

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      • #4
        I'm a big fan of "coining" or straight knurling for small knobs that only need to be turned and not pushed or pulled. I would imagine that a regular angled knurl sharpened in the same manner would do well for straight knurling?
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          That's a neat tool. I love it. Not as complicated as the two wheel designs. I will have to save this thread for a later project.

          Separate question: In your second photo I see a graduated dial that appears to be part of your QC tool holder: it seems to have 40 divisions. I assume it is for setting the angle of the tool on the post. Can you confirm that. And it has a spring around the top. What is that spring used for?
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            I'm a big fan of "coining" or straight knurling for small knobs that only need to be turned and not pushed or pulled. I would imagine that a regular angled knurl sharpened in the same manner would do well for straight knurling?
            Exactly. I have 30-degree knurling wheel waiting for sharpening so that I can use it to cut straight knurls. Fine adjustment setscrews come handy if I want longer part with straight knurl.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
              That's a neat tool. I love it. Not as complicated as the two wheel designs. I will have to save this thread for a later project.

              Separate question: In your second photo I see a graduated dial that appears to be part of your QC tool holder: it seems to have 40 divisions. I assume it is for setting the angle of the tool on the post. Can you confirm that. And it has a spring around the top. What is that spring used for?
              Thanks!
              Yes, its a Multifix clone toolpost that can be set to 40 different positions. Probably most common toolpost style here.
              The spring is just holding the endplate/swarf cover or whatever that thing is.

              Comment


              • #8
                that worked well. John Stevenson posted some time ago a similar idea using the common knurl wheel where the pattern is at 45 degrees....use it in that holder and produce a straight knurl

                edit: oops missed the post where you noted that already
                Last edited by Mcgyver; 03-09-2017, 08:10 AM.
                .

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                • #9
                  Nice. What process did you use to blue/oxidize the part?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pinstripe View Post
                    Nice. What process did you use to blue/oxidize the part?
                    Phosphoric acid bath and some parts are blue just because tig welding. Wanted to do parkerizing for the parts but its still cold outside and dont want to "cook" the parkerizing inside.

                    Forgot to mention the trick to make the split sleeve: its made of two pieces 10x16 key steel stock clamped to 4-jaw chuck, drilled and reamed trough. Key steel stock is a pleasure to machine if yuo dont count the warping habits it has sometimes.

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                    • #11
                      Getting a STRAIGHT knurl turned out to be LOT more difficult than making a diamond knurl.
                      I have now lots of pre-knurled stock for projects

                      left to right:
                      6082 Aluminium
                      Thin wall steel tubing
                      CR 1018
                      Another 1018 bar



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                      • #12
                        I see mention of sharpening the knurling wheel. Can anyone elaborate on the process/tools used to sharpen one?
                        Thanks in advance.
                        Glenn Bird

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                        • #13
                          This video demostrates the method that I actually use for setting the relief/clearance angle
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FexKdk5pWo

                          I'll still have to fool around with the starting technique, even that video doesn't show it clearly.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by woodenbird View Post
                            I see mention of sharpening the knurling wheel. Can anyone elaborate on the process/tools used to sharpen one?
                            Thanks in advance.
                            You want a sharp corner as distinct from the chamfered corner you'd use for bump knurling. How you sharpen depends on the equipment at hand. If you have a tool and cutter grinder you probably know how to sharpen jobs that come up and don't need advice. If you have only a lathe and small stuff, hold it in the chuck or a collet, preferably with a copper or aluminum strip between the knurl wheel and the chuck or collet. Get it running true, then go for a tool post grinder or a hand grinder clamped on the compound.
                            .
                            "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              MattiJ,

                              Thanks for posting. Now I have another tool to make! In a box from the lathe I purchased there were cutters for this but I didn't know how they would be used, now I know how and will be doing so as soon as I get the tool made.
                              One question, how is this different than a 2 wheel pressure cutter in terms of load on the spindle and materials being knurled?
                              Look forward to any responses.

                              TX
                              Mr fixit for the family
                              Chris

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