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Help with pronunciation of a german to English translation.Please? Alistair

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  • Help with pronunciation of a german to English translation.Please? Alistair

    Ok to get this sorted once and for all. Which is correct HARDINGE.
    Is it properly pronounced as I believe after living in Deutschland for five years and speaking THEN (not quite so perfect today of course LOL )

    Hard ding-geh?

    or
    Hard in jeh?

    I know Dinge is pronounced Din-geh when using it in normal Deutsch or German if you prefer, I.E The spoken word. Dinge means * thing.*

    I know of no JEH ending as to my knowledge Dinj or hard-dinj pronunciation does not exist help me if I am wrong? Please Black Forest or Evan,or any other Meister Deutsch Sprecher? LOL

    This ending is nearly always used by English speakers as dinj. From what I hear when the word is used say for example by Tubal-Mr pete who ends the word ending with geh a hard guttural as in Hard - dingeh

    I understand the typing I.E My typing is incorrect I just altered it as best I could to get as near to what the sound comes across as to me . MY attempt at explaining what I hear for better or worse.
    Brotherly love as always Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    In this case since the H is at the end then do not pronounce it. Pretend it doesn't exist. There are some (just a few) German words that break the usual rules such as der Flagge which has two g's to give a hard "geh" (not the J sound but the g as in "gut", not usual in German. (Flag)

    Har-ding-eh is correct. Ding as in ding-dong. Not as in the English "dinge" as in "din-jy"
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    • #3
      Here's one of their promotional videos. The name is pronounced 5 seconds in. Sounds like Har dinj to me.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzDiC74qQic

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      • #4
        English mispronunciation in that video.

        Go here and listen to the German 3, 4 and 5. They have real German accents.

        http://www.pronouncekiwi.com/Hardinge%20Brothers

        When I speak German in Germany I am mistaken for a local. That actually applies to any language I speak and even English in different parts of North America. Don't know why I do that, it is some sort of habit. Wherever I am within a sentence or two I always sound like a local. Most likely thanks to my mother that speaks five languages flawlessly.

        I do have to be a bit careful though. If I start thinking in Danish I will speak English with a Danish accent.
        Last edited by Evan; 03-11-2017, 08:24 PM.
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        • #5
          I suppose it's one of those "when in Rome" things. I'm guessing that a German promotional video for Hardinge would pronounce the name like a German just as the American one pronounces it like an American. Is it correct that the company is American and founded by Canadians with a German name? If the company made the video then I would assume they believe the name is pronounced correctly.

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          • #6
            May well be but we commonly import words into English. If we are going to do that then we should also import the correct pronunciation. The name is Scandinavian/German. So am I.

            I neglected to mention that the "r" should have a bit of a roll on it, at least in the Southern half of Germany.
            Last edited by Evan; 03-11-2017, 08:36 PM.
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            • #7
              Everyone who I have ever heard pronounce the name here in Michigan pronounced it "-dinge," even some German transplants. When in Rome, I suppose.

              Of course, I live in a town named Grand Blanc, but the proper pronunciation is Grand Blank. Ask anyone who lives here. Might have been otherwise in 1822, but today it is Grand Blank for any local alive to speak the name.
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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              • #8
                As far as I know the is no "jeh" sound in "German". so "har- ding - geh" seems right.

                These things are strange sometimes.

                St Louis is a French origin city, to a considerable extent. There are some street names which seem to be pronounced wrong wrong but may be correct.

                1) "Gravois". French would be something like "gra-vwah". It is actually pronounced "gra-voy" here. Research seems to indicate the "gra-voy" is actually close to how the French who lived here really DID pronounce it.

                2) "Chouteau". French should be something like "shoo-tow". The actual pronunciation is "Show-tow". Again, it seems that Monsieur Chouteau may have actually pronounced his name similarly to "Show-tow".

                On the other hand, "Des Peres" (a local town) is pronounced as it should be in French, something like "day-pair".

                The "proper" pronunciation is what the persons with the name say it is, frankly. So if they called themselves "Har-dinj", then that is what it is.

                Myself, I learned German long ago (and have forgotten much through disuse). But some of it has stuck. To me, when I see German names, I always think of them in German pronunciation. "Weber" is to me pronounced "Vay-ber", for instance. usually however, the folks with the name would of course say "web-er".
                1601

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                • #9
                  This sounds like a repeat of the recent thread over the pronunciation of Knipex, that went on for pages, complete with video ads from the US and Germany.The fact is people change or mispronounce names all the time, even in the same country. Houston, a city in Texas is also a street in New York City where it is pronounced HOUSE-ton St. We import and mispronounce foreign place names all rhe time. LEE-ma, Peru became
                  LIME-a, Ohio. ma-DRID, Spain became New MAD-drid, Missouri. BO-ga-taw(Bogota), Columbia is Also a town in NJ pronounced ba-GO-duh. We say tamale in English. The word does not exist in Spanish. One is a TAMAL, more than one are TAMALES. People are not even straight on Porshe. That little e that is pronounced like an a on the end of German words is often dropped in English.

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                  • #10
                    Har-ding-eh
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

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                    • #11
                      My name is Mace. There is only one pronunciation to that word regardless of all the meanings it has but you should see...err...hear some people try to pronounce it.
                      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                      • #12
                        While we are on names my name, Evan is from the Welsh for John. Then I recently looked it up in Hebrew and it actually does have a very direct meaning, Rock. As in a piece of a rock, a stone. I kind of like that better than John, not sure why. It is finally becoming a little more common, for some odd reason it used to be rare. I like it because everybody knows how to pronounce it and is very easy to spell. Although in Germany they say Eevan (long E). Close enough.
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                        • #13
                          Evan same name is also IAN, Jan or John, in Welsh it could also be Ieuan there are different ways of spelling pronounce yayan . Thanks guy you are spot on there as I said is a German or Deutsch word dinge pronounced din-geh.
                          Phew Some arguments I have had over many years with that one. As some people getting annoyed as it is usually called in incorrect English translation as dinje.
                          OK all back to bed till dinner time LOL Alistair HEh HEh Poor George is going to have a nightmare sorting out if this is political or not sorry George. lol just kidding Alistair
                          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                            My name is Mace. There is only one pronunciation to that word regardless of all the meanings it has but you should see...err...hear some people try to pronounce it.
                            So the one way would then be to pronounce it "mah-chay"? That's what it seems like to me.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              Well if you ask me, we can't even settle on one pronunciation of words in our native languages so why should we expect one, proper way for words in others. Heck, we can't even get proper spelling.

                              Why worry about it?
                              Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 03-12-2017, 07:36 PM.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

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