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I've been cooned!!! o.t.

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  • I've been cooned!!! o.t.

    About 4 weeks ago, my wife was kept awake all night by things going "thump" in my attic, and strange noises from outside the house. I didn't hear anything but my good wife certainly did, and demanded that I look up in the attic and go outside and see if I could find out what was going on. I took everything out of the spare bedroom closet, got my stepladder and my big flashlight and opened the attic trap-door. Nothing seemed out of place in the attic, but there was far more light in the attic than there should have been----very strange. A walk around outside the house turned up two pieces of aluminum soffit, which the wind had been blowing around on the snow crust and making the racket. A look up immediately showed two gaps where my soffit pieces should have been, and inspection of the pieces of soffit showed they had been bent and pushed out from inside the attic---stranger and stranger.

    My house is a split level, having the roof at one end about 3 foot higher than the roof on the lower part of the house. At the "joint" between the two roof levels, a very small bit of gable end is exposed, and the soffit around the upper roof overhangs the lower roof by about two feet. It seems that a coon had climbed a tree which is close to my house, stood on the lower roof, pushed up the overhanging soffit on the upper roof, and climbed into my attic. Of course, once the damned coon was in there, the soffit dropped back into place and the coon was trapped. It bumbled around the attic half the night, then adventured out onto a different piece of soffit at the front of my house, and the weight of the coon caused the soffit to buckle and drop the coon into my driveway.

    A week later, two coons were in the attic, same old, same old, and in the morning a very irate Mrs. Rupnow demanded that I call "Varmint Control" in the yellow pages of our phone book and get somebody out to fix things.---And what does this cost, was my first question when somebody answered the call. Answer--$150 to come out and see what was causing the problem, and $100 each for each animal trapped.

    Not wanting to have Mrs. Rupnow any more irate than she already was, I said "Come on out, and bring your traps!!" So----out he comes, and over the course of 3 weeks trapped four coons and disposed of them.---Now I'm up to $550 and there still is the issue of even more coons possibly getting in. However, all is not lost. It just happens that for a "nominal fee" the coon trapper will fix any entrance points where the coons could get in. It seems that when my house was built 30 years ago, the soffits were not screwed into place. They set in an aluminum "track" and are apparently held in place only by the grace of God and gravity.

    Of course, it is very unlikely that a coon could scale a sheer wall and push up my soffits, but all the soffits overhanging the lower roof have to be removed, a layer of sheet aluminum screwed into place, and then the soffits put back into place to foil anymore coons. This was going to be done for the low, low price of $600.

    Now I'm up to $1150, and the original displaced soffits still have to be put back in place and the tree closest to the house has to be trimmed back to keep the buggers off my roof.

    Now two things are making me crazy in all of this. Firstly, if I was 10 years younger I would have caught the coons and repaired the questionable soffits and trimmed the damned tree myself. Secondly, and even worse, if the fact that probably I brought this all on myself. Two years ago I put up a nifty bird feeder just outside the family room sliding glass doors so wife and I could watch all the cute little birdies all winter. And we've seen lots and lots of cute little birdies. Birds are very messy eaters. Half the birdseed ended up on the ground.--Which was fine, because that encouraged the herd of wild turkeys that live in the woods behind us to come out once a day and scrounge up all the seed that had fallen into the snow below the bird feeder.--Trouble is, it also encouraged the squirrels, and the rabbits, and the skunks, and the coons---friggin coons!!!---We even seen a possum out there, and I had NEVER seen a possum before in Ontario.

    As soon as the snow melts and the ground thaws out, the bird feeder is history. Sorry, little birdies. If wife and I ever want to see little birdies again, we'll watch "The Nature of Things" on the boob tube.

    Does any of the above prove anything?---Well, probably that you never get too old to do something dumb. Coons---Bah---humbug!!!
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Just be thankful you got them out early. There is a house near me that has been repaired twice already and a few animals caught. Problem occurs if they nest there and defecate there, then you have problems.
    My guess is if you had taken care of it there might be a few less coons around, unfortunately when the professionals are involved the animal count remains they just get relocated, and not to far away also.
    Like I said be thankful you caught it early

    Harold

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    • #3
      Pepsi & blue heron fly bait for horses. Mix the granules with Pepsi or Coke but Pepsi is sweeter & works better. Put in a pie tin & they will die withing a couple of feet, sometime with their head in the tin. Works every time.
      I keep a 410 with #9 shot n the shop & got 4 in one night all in about 10 seconds with a flashlight, it was like th OK corral. The folks across the street, only house in 1/4 mile leaves cat food out all night so the coons eat there & sleep at Motel flylo & they've torn insulation down & done a lot of damage.
      Last edited by flylo; 03-19-2017, 07:40 PM.

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      • #4
        I enjoy them outside.. they give me no problems and have just as much right to live (outside) as we do.

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        • #5
          I watched out my kitchen window while a coon on the roof of the house behind me grabbed the roof vent, arched his back, and tore the vent right off the roof to get inside. They are very strong and smart critters.

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          • #6
            They are opportunistic.

            They do not KNOW there is a nice warm attic, so they are not looking to dig into the roof, usually. But they sure know if there is a soft spot and heat coming out, and they will try to get in there. If there isn't any way in, they don;t get in and no problems.

            Maybe some coons have learned about attics.

            Neighbors had coons in attic. Stupid pest people wanted to put the traps around outside her house on the ground. Of course they caught cats, dogs, possium, everything BUT the momma coon and 3 little ones. They charged for everything caught, even if they had to let it go, Maybe the pest folks were crazy like a fox...... they got paid.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #7
              Where to catch the coons is not a fixed situation. When I first contacted the Varmint control guy, he had the traps set in my attic, which seemed pretty logical to me, except that he caught nothing. As soon as he moved the traps outside, he caught 4 coons one right after the other.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #8
                And maybe they dumped the coons out in another neighborhood for more business. I like coons, warm dead ones. Those 4 I shot in the shop in the dark sure were fun. I need to put a light on the 410 as I had to set the light down to pump.

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                • #9
                  They can indeed climb a sheer wall. I worked in a lumberyard/hardware store that was a 100 yrs of covering over and combing building and we had a continual problem with coons getting in the attic. They would scale a wall in an area under roof used for outside storage and would get into attic space over the store show room.
                  We had one end up in the showroom. Luckily it was an area seldom used and the owner was able to shoot it with a .22.

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                  • #10
                    Im partial to coons since my friend had one as a pet growing up. Yes very smart little critters. No reason to go killing them just seal up the house and they cant get in. End of story. If you have coons getting in your probably have other critters getting in as well. Critters are no different than humans. We will all seek shelter out of the elements.

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                    • #11
                      Jeezzes,You fellows are running your dinner off!.22 to the head,skin(sell hide to furr dealer)gut ,the young ones season and fry,the old ones bake with taters,onions and carrots.Not as good as cotton tails or ground hog,but not bad.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                        Where to catch the coons is not a fixed situation. When I first contacted the Varmint control guy, he had the traps set in my attic, which seemed pretty logical to me, except that he caught nothing. As soon as he moved the traps outside, he caught 4 coons one right after the other.
                        'Cept'n only ones you care about are the ones that come inside. The rest of the area can have a coon on every square metre and you don't care. (well....).

                        So OUTSIDE, you pay for the coons that never bother you. INSIDE, you ONLY pay for the coons that matter.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          I have a vegetable garden and they love my strawberries and grape. Last year, 4 weeks before the grapes ripen, I set -up my homemade live trap every week-end and moved 12 out of my backyard during that period. I though I was doing well, on the fifth week end, I heard my trap close and then the coon started to make lots of noise I thought my trap door closed on its body and it was hurting. So I got out of bed, dressed up and went outside to help the poor bugger. The door was closed ok, I looked inside and it was a young one, then I heard some noise in my grape arbor, looked up and saw two more, sitting on my arbor eating grapes. I give up! I have been doing this live trapping and moving skunks and racoons ,at least 15 of each every year and do not seem to be making any progress. The varmin companies are popping like mushrooms around here, they catch and release them a block away, there is no more predators around, so it is a cash for life business. So this year I bought an electrical power supply and I am going to wire a fence around my garden and zap the buggers!
                          Cheers !
                          P

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                          • #14
                            If you trap and release less than 5 miles away they usually come back. Some #(^(%&$^$ pest control guys thought they would start dropping them off on my road in the country. Country coons are usually smart enough not to dig up flower planters but go for grubs in the lawn. Relocated six to a fairly distant wetland over a few days. Fortunately we have a few very healthy skunks to discourage the coons. Unfortunately they get into a very smelly disagreement a couple times a year!
                            Now if I can only get the bats out of my belfry!

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                            • #15
                              I put an electric fence on the tomato patch years ago. For the squirrels. Coons ate corn, but didn't like tomatoes. Voltage 210V DC, but at low current, with a small capacitor to give the reserve for a jolt

                              it was funny as heck, I with I had had a video camera. One I remember climbed up and stuck his head through between the grounded wire and the hot wire, and looked around at the ground. Then he lifted up his head and got a jolt in his neck.

                              He stuck all 4 feet out straight, and fell off, although he landed on his paws, mostly.

                              Then he looked around quickly, just as if he was checking whether anyone saw him fall off. Next he walked back over to the fence, and put a paw on it. Then the other front paw a bit higher, as if he was going to climb back. Then he sat there for a moment, looking up.

                              Finally he got back on the ground with all 4 paws and you could just see him saying to himself "I didn't want any tomatoes anyway!" and he went away flicking his tail the way they do.

                              There were others just as funny, or more so. They'd find a way in, I'd get a hot wire on that spot, and they'd look for another, getting the heck shocked out of themselves in the process.

                              Eventually the squirrels just got on the back fence, and launched themselves into the enclosure over the hot wires, usually landing on a tomato bush with a bunch of leaves flying. They would eat as much as they wanted, usually a bite out of each tomato, and when done they would just climb up the fence and take the shock on their way out. They didn't care, they were full and happy.

                              Tomatoes are now in a big cage.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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