Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ledloy- or leaded screw machine stock- will it accept silver solder?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ledloy- or leaded screw machine stock- will it accept silver solder?

    Greetings! I have a run of parts to make that must be silver soldered together. will leaded screw machine stock - or leadloy as I have heard it called - be compatible with silver solder? My previous experience shows that it cuts better than the 1018 I get from MSC. Strength is not an issue. Also- when I go to order it- what is the official designation for this stuff? I don't want to sound like the amature that I am when I order it! Thanks a bunch!!!

  • #2
    Pond,

    On the silver soldering, this is not authoritative, but I would not expect a problem. I know some brasses and bronzes have lead, and I never heard of one you couldn't silver solder.

    The leaded alloys I know of just have an L in the middle of the number, like 12L14 or 41L40. Do a web search for either of those and that should get you to a place where you can find the particular alloy you're looking for.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are using a high temperature material, it is probably more correct to call it "silver braze". I have been using Harris Safety-Silv 45 and haven't found much
      steel/copper/brass that I couldn't braze with it. Nokorode silver solder flux, or whatever your supplier recommends. I don't know specifically about Leadloy, but this stuff has been good all around

      Comment


      • #4
        When you silver braze--Cleanliness is of great import. The other trick is to make sure you flux both the parts and the silver braze wire. I was using the cadmium stuff until someone scared the living poop out of me. Now I use the cad free and by fluxing the wire it works just fine. Also small parts small wire, big parts big wire. Pay a lot of attention to the quality of your flame so you get the heat where you want it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Stepside:
          There is research that shows even handling Cadmium plated hardware should be done with barrier cremes and/or gloves. Wash up after handling that stuff too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thrud
            You have confirmed the reasons I quit using the Cad stuff. It seemed easier to use. I have found the real answer to success with silver brazing is in the prep work. It must be clean, fit well, be properly fluxed and heated with care. The trick of fluxing you brazing medium is a great help, as is having a clean tip on your torch so you can "steer" the heat. Silver brazed copper parts that are Nickle plated are really sweet. If you have 2-3volt DC, some nickle anode ($3.00) and some of the plating solution you are in business.

            Comment


            • #7
              Stepside:
              I have "never" had a problem with "wetting" the joint properly. Cleaning is the hardest part of the job I always found. The rest is easy. I found out about Cadmium after too many years exposure. It was generally considered safe until just a few years ago. Ain't technology great?

              Comment


              • #8
                Thrud: It depends on where you have been. I worked for The Boeing Co. in Seattle during the 50s. At that time they had a little chemical kit that they issued in the shop for testing for cadmium. It was to be used for testing for cadmium before any operation that involved heat, INCLUDING MACHINING. I don't remember the contents of the kit, but it was a two step process. You applied a drop of chemical 1 and waited 5 minutes and added a drop of chemical 2. If it turned yellow, there was cadmium. A study of an elementary chemical textbook would probably reveal what the chemicals were. Fred.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another reason not to have cadmium plated tools....
                  Apparently it reacts with titanium. According to Lockheed, use of cadmium-plated tools on titanium hardware leads to stress fracturing at well below maximum stress.

                  Info out of book "Skunk Works", by the guy who ran it after Kelly Johnson.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Fred
                    Boeing has always been ahead of other industries in many areas (they had to). For a long time their Boesheild T-9 was the only really good rust preventative spray (I still use it on my Starrett #199 MP Level). They have some metal cutting lube I would like to try - price is scary though - about the same as a 757 me thinks! (OUCH)

                    OSO
                    That is interesting - probably cost $200 million to figure that out. It's ok though, your tax dollars never pay for things like that - $1800 wire cutters are another story! <G>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Unfortunately adverse material reactions are often discovered because of part failure. Hopefully you catch these things in the lab but not always. Cad has been on the NASA no-no list for a long time, same for most other customer specs. Used to spend a lot of time tracking down materials in COTS hardware, lot of suppliers were mum on materials in their products.

                      ------------------
                      Neil Peters
                      Neil Peters

                      When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X