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  • Friction nut results

    I tried several of the mentioned ideas, here is how they fared. The Nyloc nut, first off it was too stiff to be turned by hand, so I ran a well used tap though it. It did work although it was looser than I wanted. A spring, I only had a few compression springs of the correct diameter on hand and they proved to be too light to work. I think that a properly sized one could do the trick. Heavy Teflon tape (the pink stuff), this worked hit and miss, if I had too many wraps it would get pushed down the stud, too few and it would be too loose and I don’t think it would last through many adjustments. Nylon set screw through the nut, This worked really well, I set the screw (6-32) so I could see it protruded just beyond the internal threads, then screwed it on the stud. The tension was a little stiff, but I was still able to turn it by hand. The next is similar to what comes on the original Tripan holders, the stud has a groove and a piece of bent spring steel is inserted and tensions the nut. The closest thing I had is some .033” piano wire. It did work, but I couldn’t get the tension I needed and after taking it apart I could see wear marks on it, so I didn’t continue. The last was the Vibra-Tite reusable threadlocker. This worked pretty well, the initial tension is about the same as the set screws. The label says it is good for 5 removals, so it might not last. I’ve done 10 with the nylon set screws and 6 with the Vibra-Tite and am going to see how the do long term. Thanks again for all the ideas. Stu

  • #2
    Let the vibratite dry twice as long as you think it needs to. And clean the screw first. It is a coating, so it has to adhere. And it has to reach its final state, without any solvent left in it.

    Of course, if you wear it off, it's easy to replace....
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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    • #3
      My feeling is that you really do not want the nut to be able to move by hand. If you can then it is too loose and you will see it move on its own when you do not want it to move. The idea of the Nyloc nuts is so you NEED to use a wrench. But it also ensures it won't move when you don't want it to move. Which is exactly why I suggested it in the other thread.

      The trick setup for the Nyloc nuts as supplied would be a long reach 7/16 socket to fit the 1/4-20 size you said you needed and add a "T" handle you make up to fit the socket. Easier to reach down past the tool post lever than using a regular wrench.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        Let the vibratite dry twice as long as you think it needs to. And clean the screw first. It is a coating, so it has to adhere. And it has to reach its final state, without any solvent left in it.

        Of course, if you wear it off, it's easy to replace....
        I cleaned the screw with acetone, let it sit, applied the vibra-tite and let it sit over 30 min. The instructions called for 10-30 min. Stu

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        • #5
          I would try deforming the first thread of the female threaded portion with a ball bearing to essentially cause some slight interference on the pitch diameter. This may not work if the fit is really sloppy.

          I worked with an old timer for a few years who worked in a screw machine shop many years ago. They had a batch of parts that were rejected by a customer as the no go thread gauge would thread in. He had somebody in quality deform the start of the thread with a spherical ball and hammer so the no go pitch gauge wouldn't go in and reshipped them to the customer. He was really proud of that.
          www.thecogwheel.net

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          • #6
            Try putting a few pieces of lead bird shot in the set screw hole of the nut and tighten them down. Add one or two, squish then down, then add more until you have made a lead cushion. You should be able to control the tension with the setscrew.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Stu View Post
              I cleaned the screw with acetone, let it sit, applied the vibra-tite and let it sit over 30 min. The instructions called for 10-30 min. Stu
              My experience is that longer is better, using the stuff in production, but 30 min is often enough.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by akajun View Post
                Try putting a few pieces of lead bird shot in the set screw hole of the nut and tighten them down. Add one or two, squish then down, then add more until you have made a lead cushion. You should be able to control the tension with the setscrew.
                I've seen this method in several older machines. The lead shot gives a nice firm smooth feel to the adjusting nut or screw.

                JL...............

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                • #9
                  Stu have you tried aero-lock nuts? You could probably adjust the locking tab to set your preferred tension.
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

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