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  • Downsizing from large machines.

    Hi folks,

    I have a Clausing 5914 and a Bridgeport but will soon be moving out of State. All of my heavy stuff will be sold off rather than ship it.

    I may buy large machines after I get settled into a new home (retiring soon) but for now I need at least a small lathe (and maybe a mill) to keep up with ongoing projects. I do plan to keep the smaller machines, even if I eventually get larger ones.

    I know the limitations of small machines and have operated a few types in years past. However, I'm not up on the latest models and would like some advice.

    I'm looking at this one...

    http://littlemachineshop.com/product...ory=1271799306

    But I'm wondering if the above is really worth the additional cost over this one...

    http://littlemachineshop.com/product...ory=1271799306

    I'd gladly pay for the "HiTorque" machine if it has proven to be reliable.

    Also, I'm wondering if the above vendor is a good one, or if there are others I should consider. I'm also open to other machines in a similar price range.

    Forgive me if the above has been covered 100s of times here. If so, please direct me to related threads if possible. A search didn't quite answer my questions.

    TIA

  • #2
    Smaller lathes like the ones you've linked to are nothing but toys and I really think that stepping down from a 5914
    will be a huge disappointment. I'd look a little harder at the option of moving your existing machines...
    Keith
    __________________________
    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to the forum. After using your present machines I think you'll be really disappointed in a 7" import lathe. I'd look for a 11" or larger Logan, SB 9" or a 10"+ Atlas. If I had to buy new chinese I'd go at least this 1-"x22" Grizzly & wouldn't want to do that Grizzly
      Grizzly G0602 Bench Top Metal Lathe, 10 x 22-Inch
      4.3 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews | 17 answered questions
      Note: This item is only available from third-party sellers (see all offers).
      Available from these sellers.
      Hardened and ground V-way bed
      Oil-bath gearbox
      Tool box with service tools
      Number of longitudinal feeds: 9
      Chip tray and backsplash
      › See more product details
      New (2) from $1,325.00 + $109.00 shipping

      Just my opinion, Again Welcome! If you could give us an idea where you're moving we may be of more help as people are buying, dyeing, & selling machines all the time but selling is not allowed on here but maybe someones knows of machines coming up for sale.
      Last edited by flylo; 03-23-2017, 06:54 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have downsized, and am having a wonderful time. !

        I downsized from large machines ( Colchester Bantam, Pedersen mill, Busy Bee 13 by 36 Lathe all gone) to " as New"small ones. I have a Soutbend 9" now with Hardinge Turret, a Myford ML10, an Emco FB2 mill. I did keep my Busy Bee BO 48 Mill, at the last minute we found space for it.I bought the best I could find in the secondhand market. I did consider new. offshore equipment, but nothing I saw or tried quite matched up to what I wanted. It took me over a year to move and re equip, but now I find my enthusiasm for my new shop increasing daily. Regards David Powell.

        Comment


        • #5
          I moved some 550 road miles almost a year ago. I located a company that provided an industrial trailer and transportation. I contracted for riggers from a local firm to load the machinery, which included a Bridgeport clone, a 10 x 20 toolroom lathe, a couple of big pantographs, and a host of other machinery. After seeing the riggers work, my son and I rented an extensible boom forklift and did the unloading ourselves. The move was less expensive and less traumatic than I had expected. The trailer rental included a reasonable time to load and unload, debut since we were not quite ready at the unloading site, I used their reasonable storage fee to extend the trailer time by one month.

          Jim

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi & Welcome to the forum. You will, as I'm sure you've noticed, get a diverse set of opinions...

            Little Machine Shop has a fairly decent reputation, as far as I can tell, for quality and good stuff ... within the limits of what it is they sell in the first place. In other words, a Sieg lathe is a Sieg lathe is a Sieg lathe. You'll probably get a better one (maybe fit-and-finish is better, tolerances better, etc) from LMS than from, say, Harbor Freight. But they still are Sieg lathes. Grizzly is also fairly decent wrt to the quality/etc (again, within what they have to work with). LMS is nice because they have a variety of spare parts, starter-kits, upgrades, and so on that are specifically made for those machines --- so establishing a relationship with them might be a good thing (I have no relationship with LMS, am just a happy occasional-customer).

            I don't know whether "Hi Torque" is worth the extra money, etc. But that said, my general theory on hobby stuff is that if you can afford it, why not? It might be useful/fun some day ... and it can't hurt.

            Regardless of what you get, be prepared to spend a fair amount of time tuning the machines up -- tightening this and cleaning that and so on. I actually found this an enjoyable task on the mini-mill and mini-lathe I bought from Grizzly ... I'm teaching myself how to use them/machine/etc, and taking the machines apart, cleaning, and so on, was a pretty good initiation into how they work.

            You don't say what you're working on, so it's hard to address whether they will be adequate for your needs or not. The machines are limited -- small, low power, and so on. They are adequate-to-great within their capabilities, but don't expect them to be merely scaled down versions of your Clausing and Bridgeport.


            Good Luck & let us know what you end up doing

            Comment


            • #7
              If your new home shop has the space, and you like the machines you have, move the machines. I recently (2years ago) moved from Northern NJ to the Bahamas and took my woodworking shop and metal working shop with me. Slightly more than 2/3 of a 40' cargo container with tools and accessories. The rest was household goods. Box everything in plywood crates that can be moved with a tele-handler and a pallet jack. Put the machines on purpose built pallets and load away. We had the cargo container delivered on a Friday afternoon, picked up Monday AM and loaded all weekend. Your wife will think you are nuts boxing up all the items (mine did) but once she sees how easily you can stack things with the tele-handler and load them in the container then place them all the way in the nose with the pallet jack she was a believer. She also got a kick out of driving the machine.

              Good luck,

              Rick

              Comment


              • #8
                Almost everyone I know of who has moved, and fallen into the "we'll sell this stuff and buy again instead of moving it", whether machines, or household goods, has been relatively unhappy with the result, and lost money on the deal. Not what I would call a recommendation for that approach.

                Admittedly it is only a few people, but still. The only person I know who was perfectly happy afterward was one who didn't have much to begin with and is one of those folks who just don't care about what they call "worldly goods".
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Unless you don't have space for the machines where you're moving to, move what you have. It's not too hard or expensive and you would lose way more money selling your existing machines and retooling for new machines that you'd be way out of pocket.

                  No way I'd sell my tools - took me too long to get them the way I want them. I've moved them once across country and I'll be moving them again in a few months. Not as big as yours mind, but still enough.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am happy NOT to have what I had !

                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    Unless you don't have space for the machines where you're moving to, move what you have. It's not too hard or expensive and you would lose way more money selling your existing machines and retooling for new machines that you'd be way out of pocket.

                    No way I'd sell my tools - took me too long to get them the way I want them. I've moved them once across country and I'll be moving them again in a few months. Not as big as yours mind, but still enough.
                    I an not sorry or sad about letting my bigger machines go. My son has my Colchester, some good friends have my 13/36 lathe and my Pedersen mill is now facing cylinder heads for a racing enthusiast.HOWEVER, I kept all my small tools , materials, and useful fixtures.I am retired, I can concentrate on what I want to do.For instance, I kept my Hardinge turret, threw away the brackets that adapted it to the Busy Bee lathe and fitted it, as intended, to my Southbend.I spent this morning making 100 or so union nuts for model steam engines on it. Now will alter the set up for another size. Keep all you can easily move which you reckon might help with a smaller shop, let the machines go, preferably to friends and family, and do not look back, but only forwards. Regards David Powell.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have to agree that you'll lose your shirt by selling what you have. Even if you don't have room for it I'd suggest slathering the machines down with today's equivalent of cosmoline and put them into a storage unit for a couple of years. It'll cost you of course. But likely not as much as the loss you'll take in selling then buying again at some future time. Not to mention the cost in time lost on the other end finding the next machines and all the related tooling to go with them. And as we know the tooling is often as much a commitment as the machines that use it.

                      On the 7" mini lathes the one to get is the 14 or 16" bed versions. Just the work piece and reasonable size drill bits will make you run out of room on the shorter ones all too often. On top of that have a look on You Tube at the various modifications that folks make. Some of them are just convenience changes but a surprising number of modifications are to correct apparent weaknesses in the basic design brought on by keeping the machines to the price point that they enjoy.

                      Each time I mention this owners leap to the defense of their machines. And that's fine. Clearly they work or folks would not buy them. But I'd suggest that the folks that did these mods apparently found that the lathes did not do as well as they could do or they would not have needed the mods to make the lathe more capable. So it's a case of YMMV. But have a look at a few such videos and decide for yourself if the 7x options are something you can live with or if you'd be better off with something a touch larger even as a small size temporary option.

                      It would be different if you were actually looking at downsizing the machines to fit a more compact footprint shop. But it sounds like you still want the full size capability at some point in the relatively near future. And with that in mind I'd be reluctant to release what you spent so long and so much on putting together.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vee3 View Post
                        < snip >

                        I know the limitations of small machines and have operated a few types in years past. However, I'm not up on the latest models and would like some advice.
                        <snip>
                        I'd gladly pay for the "HiTorque" machine if it has proven to be reliable.
                        Also, I'm wondering if the above vendor is a good one, or if there are others I should consider. I'm also open to other machines in a similar price range.

                        TIA
                        To address your questions (as opposed to questioning your quest )

                        I've had many dealings with Little machine shop, all of them positive. I'd recommend them. You will find that they have all the accessories that you might want for that lathe too.

                        The Hi Torque models address one of the valid complaints about small lathes, and that was insufficient torque at low speed when turning sizable pieces. The brushless DC motor provides good torque even at low speeds. It has the same advantages as using a VFD on your larger machines.

                        If you are planning to replace your bigger machines, the smaller one makes a good second op machine. I still use my 7x12 frequently even though I have a 9x20.


                        Dan
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                        Location: SF East Bay.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am not impressed with those 7" models, but I am sure you can make things with them. I have a 3" Unimat and it is useful for small parts. The models you mention both have 1.2 HP motors, probably the same one, so power is about equal. The work envelope would be my first concern. I find that you can work up to one limit or another of the envelope but you can't efficiently go against both. Generally you are working well within both limits. Do you really need that extra 2" in length? I didn't go into the other specs. in any detail.

                          My "big" lathe is a SB9 and I like that size. I was able to pick it up from the seller in my truck with no sweat. It can be easily taken apart into pieces that I can carry. No lifting equipment was needed when I got it.

                          I also had to move and I had my shop. I actually did move it across three states. You can read about it here and in the two follow up threads.

                          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...ght=great+shop
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            Almost everyone I know of who has moved, and fallen into the "we'll sell this stuff and buy again instead of moving it", whether machines, or household goods, has been relatively unhappy with the result, .
                            agreed. What the sell and replace theory misses is what I call he value of the collection. For me anyway, its 25 years of finding just the right machine with all the bits in the right condition etc. I could sell it all for X, but could not replicate in short order for 5X.....its not like canned goods on the shelf

                            I see real value in the collection....no will likely every pay me for it, I'll only be able to sell for 1X, but the 4x difference is real to me in the sell and starting over analysis.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by danlb View Post
                              To address your questions (as opposed to questioning your quest )
                              Yes we do tend to do that don't we? I'll extend my usual full refund warranty
                              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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