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OT - How would you clean these grills/grates?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
    Rather than mess about seasoning the grids and grates with vegetable oil, I would use one of the traditional graphite based grate and stove polishes (Zebrite, Hotspot...) applied with an old toothbrush and a rag, or just plain graphite powder brushed well into the surface. It would make them look very smart, and on the areas which don't get hot enough to burn it off I think it should act as a release coating for the food spatter. Regularly applied, it might help to prevent the food build-up in future.

    George
    The bar grates are going to be in contact with food. The burner grates will be under pots of food that can catch fumes. 'Nothing' is the proper thing to use.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by challenger View Post
      Here are the post inferno grates. Not a speck of precious owner grease.


      Galaxy S4, Slimkat
      If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
      They look terrific. Time to start grilling!

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      • #33
        I'd love some sort of coating that would keep food, drips and what have you from sticking. I have never heard of a graphite coating but I leary about graphite and food contact?
        A porcelain coating would be lovely but that's not going to happen.
        Currently I am trying some oil and bake in a barbecue seasoning of these grates. I'm having trouble getting the proper time and temperature however. First attempt left the grate still oily after cooling. Second attempt left the grate without any oil as it got burned off so too little temp for the first time and too much for the second. I am using peanut oil BTW and trying to get 400*F. Can I get a thick coating after many sessions/cycles?
        I am doing this as I do other things so it isn't currently a time burden and who knows, I might learn something?

        Galaxy S4, Slimkat
        If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

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        • #34
          An oven will have much better heat control than a BBQ.
          To season, first scrub clean with a brush and detergent. Wipe on a THIN coat of oil - the Lodge brand seasoning oil is just 100% Canola oil. Bake in an oven at 400° for an hour, turn off the oven and let it cool. Repeat the thin oil coat and bake routine a few times, until you are happy with the coating. 3x is probably about right. Put on a very thin oil coat after finishing the seasoning (and don't bake).
          Location: North Central Texas

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          • #35
            I agree with Joel. To emphasize a few things..

            I prefer regular Crisco, or lard or bacon grease. Whatever oil you use, apply it to the part while the part is warm. You want the oil to spread out. Sometimes lint or fuzz will stick to a rough casting, especially if it rough, so choose a rag that resists that. Wipe off as much of the oil as possible. You want it as thin as possible.

            400 or 450 is a good temp for polymerization. Arrange the objects so the oil that runs off does not pool. Letting it cool between applications is important, I believe, for the process. There is a big reaction involving the creation of long chains of connected molecules. It should not be tacky after it is properly polymerized. If it is, increase the time. It can also be an indication the oil was too thick, or not hot enough.

            Once you have it polymerized, it will take higher temperatures to carbonize. That's where the black comes from. If you go straight to high temps without the polymerization steps, it is not the same. However I have read where people suggest higher temps from the start, so I don't know.

            With pans, after initial seasoning, it seems like it takes multiple uses to get a good coating of seasoning. I wish I knew how to make it go more quickly.

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            • #36
              Challenger,

              I don't think you need worry. Generations of our grandmothers have cooked on graphite polished stoves, and we're still here. As far as I can find out from an internet search the stove polish was traditionally made from graphite, lamp black, wax, and a solvent to make it into a paste for applying. There are water-based stove polishes but they don't get good reviews.

              The solvent would evaporate in a short time - no problem there. Graphite and lamp black are different forms of pure carbon, and I have never heard of a safety warning about pure carbon, even in the state of California. That leaves us with the wax. I don't know what waxes are used but paraffin wax (canning wax) was/is used in food preservation. Carnauba wax is used as a food glaze. Beeswax is eaten with honey. There are other waxes, but I know little of them. Any wax - and there would only be a trace - would vaporise or burn off on first heating. I presume one wouldn't put the food on before the grill is hot.

              And a final thought - if the graphite rubs off onto the food, it saves you the trouble of painting the black lines on with one of those barbecue pens.

              George

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
                Challenger,

                I don't think you need worry. Generations of our grandmothers have cooked on graphite polished stoves, and we're still here. As far as I can find out from an internet search the stove polish was traditionally made from graphite, lamp black, wax, and a solvent to make it into a paste for applying. There are water-based stove polishes but they don't get good reviews.

                The solvent would evaporate in a short time - no problem there. Graphite and lamp black are different forms of pure carbon, and I have never heard of a safety warning about pure carbon, even in the state of California. That leaves us with the wax. I don't know what waxes are used but paraffin wax (canning wax) was/is used in food preservation. Carnauba wax is used as a food glaze. Beeswax is eaten with honey. There are other waxes, but I know little of them. Any wax - and there would only be a trace - would vaporise or burn off on first heating. I presume one wouldn't put the food on before the grill is hot.

                And a final thought - if the graphite rubs off onto the food, it saves you the trouble of painting the black lines on with one of those barbecue pens.

                George
                Evidently, grilling food isn't done in Old Blighty.
                The food will be in direct contact with the grates for an extended period of time, so anything other than bare iron is a no-no.

                The classic (and professional) method of cleaning grill grates (and flat grills and hibachis) is to heat them up and wipe them with a wet towel. The steam cleans up any loose material or rust. The grill is then wiped dry, the heat is removed and the grates are lightly oiled for a moisture barrier.

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                • #38
                  The decision of what the healthy choice is insofar as what or what not to apply to cooking grates is rather ironic. Given the fact that it is a widely accepted fact that charring animal flesh over a high temp open flame produces cancerous byproducts in the process.

                  In spite of that I still enjoy the barbie now and then and don't make a habit of eating from it daily so I'm not overly concerned about it. Working in the shop probably exposes me to more health and safety issues, ain't stopping that anytime soon.
                  Don't even get me started on the issues of the drive into town.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
                    Evidently, grilling food isn't done in Old Blighty.
                    Not so; I've seen it done often.

                    First put a layer of firelighters in the barbecue and top it with a load of charcoal (none of that namby-pamby bottled gas here, thank you very much).
                    Light it and place the grid over the top. As the flames climb to their highest get the chicken legs from the freezer, remove as many layers of packaging as possible before the flames die down, and throw them (the legs, not the packaging) (oh, I don't know though, it doesn't make a lot of difference) on to the grid.
                    When the outside is a nice crispy black (pure carbon, Willy, no cancer risk there) douse it in hot chilli sauce to mask the taste of kerosene, and serve.
                    If you have timed it right the crisp crackly crust on the outside combines deliciously with the rubbery flesh and crunchy ice crystals in the middle - a meaty Baked Alaska. Mmmm, yummy!

                    George

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
                      Not so; I've seen it done often.

                      First put a layer of firelighters in the barbecue and top it with a load of charcoal (none of that namby-pamby bottled gas here, thank you very much).
                      Light it and place the grid over the top. As the flames climb to their highest get the chicken legs from the freezer, remove as many layers of packaging as possible before the flames die down, and throw them (the legs, not the packaging) (oh, I don't know though, it doesn't make a lot of difference) on to the grid.
                      When the outside is a nice crispy black (pure carbon, Willy, no cancer risk there) douse it in hot chilli sauce to mask the taste of kerosene, and serve.
                      If you have timed it right the crisp crackly crust on the outside combines deliciously with the rubbery flesh and crunchy ice crystals in the middle - a meaty Baked Alaska. Mmmm, yummy!

                      George
                      That made me laugh. Thank you.
                      As one who is allergic to red meat I have to rely one chicken and turkey for a lot of my food. After almost eight years of this allergy I have become so sick and tired of the dirty bird and its larger cousin. To say I'm sick of chicken and turkey is an understatement. As a matter of fact, if I saw a chicken cross the road I'd flatten that fu(&er to the thickness of cellophane. Maybe a few forward and reverse cycles to get that done and so what. Then I'd look at the greasy road stain, laugh my ass off and spit on it before driving off. I know that makes me sound nuts.
                      Spring is almost here and soon I'll be catching the red drum for food and pleasure. [emoji2]

                      Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                      If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by challenger View Post
                        due to the fact that I'm allergic to mammalian meat. This comes from getting bit by many ticks and chiggers I am told. Therefore red meat causes an anaphylaxis reaction that is bad news.
                        That's intresting. My dad became badly allergic to any sort of fish after getting too many stings from perch spikes. Nowadays he can eat fish again but it took about 10 years.

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