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OT - How would you clean these grills/grates?

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    due to the fact that I'm allergic to mammalian meat. This comes from getting bit by many ticks and chiggers I am told. Therefore red meat causes an anaphylaxis reaction that is bad news.
    That's intresting. My dad became badly allergic to any sort of fish after getting too many stings from perch spikes. Nowadays he can eat fish again but it took about 10 years.

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  • challenger
    replied
    Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
    Not so; I've seen it done often.

    First put a layer of firelighters in the barbecue and top it with a load of charcoal (none of that namby-pamby bottled gas here, thank you very much).
    Light it and place the grid over the top. As the flames climb to their highest get the chicken legs from the freezer, remove as many layers of packaging as possible before the flames die down, and throw them (the legs, not the packaging) (oh, I don't know though, it doesn't make a lot of difference) on to the grid.
    When the outside is a nice crispy black (pure carbon, Willy, no cancer risk there) douse it in hot chilli sauce to mask the taste of kerosene, and serve.
    If you have timed it right the crisp crackly crust on the outside combines deliciously with the rubbery flesh and crunchy ice crystals in the middle - a meaty Baked Alaska. Mmmm, yummy!

    George
    That made me laugh. Thank you.
    As one who is allergic to red meat I have to rely one chicken and turkey for a lot of my food. After almost eight years of this allergy I have become so sick and tired of the dirty bird and its larger cousin. To say I'm sick of chicken and turkey is an understatement. As a matter of fact, if I saw a chicken cross the road I'd flatten that fu(&er to the thickness of cellophane. Maybe a few forward and reverse cycles to get that done and so what. Then I'd look at the greasy road stain, laugh my ass off and spit on it before driving off. I know that makes me sound nuts.
    Spring is almost here and soon I'll be catching the red drum for food and pleasure. [emoji2]

    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

    Leave a comment:


  • Georgineer
    replied
    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
    Evidently, grilling food isn't done in Old Blighty.
    Not so; I've seen it done often.

    First put a layer of firelighters in the barbecue and top it with a load of charcoal (none of that namby-pamby bottled gas here, thank you very much).
    Light it and place the grid over the top. As the flames climb to their highest get the chicken legs from the freezer, remove as many layers of packaging as possible before the flames die down, and throw them (the legs, not the packaging) (oh, I don't know though, it doesn't make a lot of difference) on to the grid.
    When the outside is a nice crispy black (pure carbon, Willy, no cancer risk there) douse it in hot chilli sauce to mask the taste of kerosene, and serve.
    If you have timed it right the crisp crackly crust on the outside combines deliciously with the rubbery flesh and crunchy ice crystals in the middle - a meaty Baked Alaska. Mmmm, yummy!

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    The decision of what the healthy choice is insofar as what or what not to apply to cooking grates is rather ironic. Given the fact that it is a widely accepted fact that charring animal flesh over a high temp open flame produces cancerous byproducts in the process.

    In spite of that I still enjoy the barbie now and then and don't make a habit of eating from it daily so I'm not overly concerned about it. Working in the shop probably exposes me to more health and safety issues, ain't stopping that anytime soon.
    Don't even get me started on the issues of the drive into town.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
    Challenger,

    I don't think you need worry. Generations of our grandmothers have cooked on graphite polished stoves, and we're still here. As far as I can find out from an internet search the stove polish was traditionally made from graphite, lamp black, wax, and a solvent to make it into a paste for applying. There are water-based stove polishes but they don't get good reviews.

    The solvent would evaporate in a short time - no problem there. Graphite and lamp black are different forms of pure carbon, and I have never heard of a safety warning about pure carbon, even in the state of California. That leaves us with the wax. I don't know what waxes are used but paraffin wax (canning wax) was/is used in food preservation. Carnauba wax is used as a food glaze. Beeswax is eaten with honey. There are other waxes, but I know little of them. Any wax - and there would only be a trace - would vaporise or burn off on first heating. I presume one wouldn't put the food on before the grill is hot.

    And a final thought - if the graphite rubs off onto the food, it saves you the trouble of painting the black lines on with one of those barbecue pens.

    George
    Evidently, grilling food isn't done in Old Blighty.
    The food will be in direct contact with the grates for an extended period of time, so anything other than bare iron is a no-no.

    The classic (and professional) method of cleaning grill grates (and flat grills and hibachis) is to heat them up and wipe them with a wet towel. The steam cleans up any loose material or rust. The grill is then wiped dry, the heat is removed and the grates are lightly oiled for a moisture barrier.

    Leave a comment:


  • Georgineer
    replied
    Challenger,

    I don't think you need worry. Generations of our grandmothers have cooked on graphite polished stoves, and we're still here. As far as I can find out from an internet search the stove polish was traditionally made from graphite, lamp black, wax, and a solvent to make it into a paste for applying. There are water-based stove polishes but they don't get good reviews.

    The solvent would evaporate in a short time - no problem there. Graphite and lamp black are different forms of pure carbon, and I have never heard of a safety warning about pure carbon, even in the state of California. That leaves us with the wax. I don't know what waxes are used but paraffin wax (canning wax) was/is used in food preservation. Carnauba wax is used as a food glaze. Beeswax is eaten with honey. There are other waxes, but I know little of them. Any wax - and there would only be a trace - would vaporise or burn off on first heating. I presume one wouldn't put the food on before the grill is hot.

    And a final thought - if the graphite rubs off onto the food, it saves you the trouble of painting the black lines on with one of those barbecue pens.

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • Glug
    replied
    I agree with Joel. To emphasize a few things..

    I prefer regular Crisco, or lard or bacon grease. Whatever oil you use, apply it to the part while the part is warm. You want the oil to spread out. Sometimes lint or fuzz will stick to a rough casting, especially if it rough, so choose a rag that resists that. Wipe off as much of the oil as possible. You want it as thin as possible.

    400 or 450 is a good temp for polymerization. Arrange the objects so the oil that runs off does not pool. Letting it cool between applications is important, I believe, for the process. There is a big reaction involving the creation of long chains of connected molecules. It should not be tacky after it is properly polymerized. If it is, increase the time. It can also be an indication the oil was too thick, or not hot enough.

    Once you have it polymerized, it will take higher temperatures to carbonize. That's where the black comes from. If you go straight to high temps without the polymerization steps, it is not the same. However I have read where people suggest higher temps from the start, so I don't know.

    With pans, after initial seasoning, it seems like it takes multiple uses to get a good coating of seasoning. I wish I knew how to make it go more quickly.

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  • Joel
    replied
    An oven will have much better heat control than a BBQ.
    To season, first scrub clean with a brush and detergent. Wipe on a THIN coat of oil - the Lodge brand seasoning oil is just 100% Canola oil. Bake in an oven at 400° for an hour, turn off the oven and let it cool. Repeat the thin oil coat and bake routine a few times, until you are happy with the coating. 3x is probably about right. Put on a very thin oil coat after finishing the seasoning (and don't bake).

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  • challenger
    replied
    I'd love some sort of coating that would keep food, drips and what have you from sticking. I have never heard of a graphite coating but I leary about graphite and food contact?
    A porcelain coating would be lovely but that's not going to happen.
    Currently I am trying some oil and bake in a barbecue seasoning of these grates. I'm having trouble getting the proper time and temperature however. First attempt left the grate still oily after cooling. Second attempt left the grate without any oil as it got burned off so too little temp for the first time and too much for the second. I am using peanut oil BTW and trying to get 400*F. Can I get a thick coating after many sessions/cycles?
    I am doing this as I do other things so it isn't currently a time burden and who knows, I might learn something?

    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    Here are the post inferno grates. Not a speck of precious owner grease.


    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
    They look terrific. Time to start grilling!

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
    Rather than mess about seasoning the grids and grates with vegetable oil, I would use one of the traditional graphite based grate and stove polishes (Zebrite, Hotspot...) applied with an old toothbrush and a rag, or just plain graphite powder brushed well into the surface. It would make them look very smart, and on the areas which don't get hot enough to burn it off I think it should act as a release coating for the food spatter. Regularly applied, it might help to prevent the food build-up in future.

    George
    The bar grates are going to be in contact with food. The burner grates will be under pots of food that can catch fumes. 'Nothing' is the proper thing to use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glug
    replied
    Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
    Rather than mess about seasoning the grids and grates with vegetable oil, I would use one of the traditional graphite based grate and stove polishes (Zebrite, Hotspot...) applied with an old toothbrush and a rag, or just plain graphite powder brushed well into the surface.
    Interesting. Didn't know about those. That uniformity could be very useful. My Grandfather was recently insisting he had some Coal Stove Polish in the basement. We were unable to locate it.

    Regarding the burn off. The parts, once stripped, should have some kind of protection applied to prevent rust, and hopefully make them easier to clean in the future. Ideally any oil 'seasoning' on the parts would first be slowly polymerized. Then it would be converted to carbon. That would have good resistance to burn-off.

    Leave a comment:


  • Georgineer
    replied
    Rather than mess about seasoning the grids and grates with vegetable oil, I would use one of the traditional graphite based grate and stove polishes (Zebrite, Hotspot...) applied with an old toothbrush and a rag, or just plain graphite powder brushed well into the surface. It would make them look very smart, and on the areas which don't get hot enough to burn it off I think it should act as a release coating for the food spatter. Regularly applied, it might help to prevent the food build-up in future.

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Whereas the grates are clean I will post what I think to be the funniest BBQ story I have ever read or heard. Sorry if it is too long for some of you old farts!

    Notes from an inexperienced Chili taster named Frank, who was visiting Texas from the East Coast:

    Recently I was honoured to be selected as an outstanding famous celebrity in Texas, to be a judge at a Chili cook-off, because no one else wanted to do it. Also the original person called in sick at the last moment, and I happened to be standing there at the judge's table asking for directions to the beer wagon when the call came. I was assured by the other two judges (Native Texans) that the chili wouldn't be all that spicy, and besides, they told me that I could have free beer during the tasting. So I accepted.

    Here are the scorecards from the event:

    CHILI # 1: MIKE'S MANIC MONSTER CHILI

    JUDGE ONE: A little to heavy on tomato. Amusing kick.

    JUDGE TWO: Nice, smooth tomato flavour. Very mild.

    FRANK: Holy ****, what the hell is this stuff? You could remove dried paint from your driveway with this stuff. I needed two beers to put the flames out. Hope that's the worst one. Those Texans are crazy.

    CHILI # 2: ARTHUR'S AFTERBURNER CHILI

    JUDGE ONE: Smokey, with a hint of pork. Slight Jalapeno tang.

    JUDGE TWO: Exciting BBQ flavour. Needs more peppers to be taken seriously.

    FRANK: Keep this out of reach of children! I'm not sure what I am supposed to taste besides pain. I had to wave of two people who wanted to give me the Heimlich manoeuvre. They had to walkie-talkie in three extra beers when they saw the look on my face.

    CHILI # 3: FRED'S FAMOUS BURN DOWN THE BARN CHILI

    JUDGE ONE: Excellent firehouse chili! Great kick. Needs more beans.

    JUDGE TWO: A beanless chili. A bit salty. Good use of red peppers.

    FRANK: Call the EPA, I've located a uranium spill. My nose feels like I have been snorting Drano. Everyone knows the routine by now. Barmaid pounded me on the back; now my backbone is in the front part of my chest. I'm getting ****-faced.

    CHILI # 4: BUBBA'S BLACK MAGIC

    JUDGE ONE: Black Bean chili with almost no spice. Disappointing.

    JUDGE TWO: Hint of lime in the black beans. Good side dish for fish or other mild foods. Not much of a chili.

    FRANK: I felt something scraping across my tongue, but was unable to taste it. Sally, the barmaid, was standing behind me with fresh refills; that 300 lb bitch is starting to look HOT, just like this nuclear-waste I'm eating.

    CHILI # 5: LINDA'S LEGAL LIP REMOVER

    JUDGE ONE: Meaty, strong chili. Cayenne peppers freshly ground, adding considerable kick. Very impressive.

    JUDGE TWO: Chili using shredded beef; could use more tomato. Must admit the cayenne peppers make a strong statement.

    FRANK: My ears are ringing, and I can no linger focus my eyes. I farted and four people behind me needed paramedics. The contestant seemed offended when I told her that her chili had given me brain damage. Sally saved my tongue from bleeding by pouring beer directly from a pitcher onto it. It really pisses me off that the other judges asked me to stop screaming. Freakin' Rednecks! ! !

    CHILI # 6: VERA'S VERY VEGETARIAN VARIETY

    JUDGE ONE: Thin yet bold vegetarian variety chili. Good balance of spice and peppers.

    JUDGE TWO: The best yet. Aggressive use of peppers, onions and garlic.

    FRANK: My intestines are now a straight pipe filled with gaseous, sulphuric flames. No one seems inclined to stand behind me except that slut Sally. I need to wipe my ass with a snow cone!

    CHILI # 7: SUSAN'S SCREAMING SENSATION CHILI

    JUDGE ONE: A mediocre chili with too much reliance on canned peppers.

    JUDGE TWO: Ho Hum. Tastes as if the chef literally threw in a can of chili peppers at the last moment. I should note that I am worried about Judge # 3.

    FRANK: You could put a #)$^@#*&! Grenade in my mouth, pull the #)$^@#*&! pin, and I wouldn't feel a damn thing. I've lost the sight in one eye, and the world sounds like it is made of rushing water. My shirt is covered with chili, which slid unnoticed out of my X*$(@#^&$ mouth. My pants are full of lava-like ****, to match my X*$(@#^&$ shirt. At least the during the autopsy they'll know what killed me. I've decided to stop breathing, it's too painful. I'm not getting any oxygen anyway. If I need air, I'll just suck it in through the four inch hole in my stomach.

    CHILI # 8: HELEN'S MOUNT SAINT CHILI

    JUDGE ONE: A perfect ending. This is a nice blend chili, safe for all; not too bold, but spicy enough to declare its existence.

    JUDGE TWO: This final entry is a good balanced chili, neither mild now hot. Sorry to see that most of it was lost when Judge # 3 passed out, fell and pulled the chili pot on top of himself. Not sure if he's going to make it. Poor Yank.

    FRANK: - - - - - Mama?- - - (Editor's Note: Judge # 3 was unable to report).

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  • Willy
    replied
    Well I can testify to doing a fine job holding onto a cocktail while standing next to the heat.
    Looks like all we need is some bus tickets and some dead critter parts! LOL

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