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  • A new tool made

    I have had a continuing project to tool up the turret attachment I have for the Logan. This is the latest installment, a knee tool.

    It's a plain outside turning tool. The two setscrews on top over the tool hold the tool in place, and also, by means of the pivot pin that the tool balances on, adjust the exact height of the tool edge. Another screw arrangement on the far side pushes the tool in or out as a fine adjustment.

    The screw over the hole in the face in front of the shank is to clamp a drill, centerdrill, or similar tool to work on the end of the part being turned, in the same operation as the OD turning. Such a tool would be mounted in a split bushing.

    I may make another one of these, It is usefiul to have more than one as there may be two diameters to turn to.





    In answer to the inevitable questions:

    1) the nicks and so forth were on the outside of the stock, which was just big enough to use. I could not (didn't want to) cut off enough to eliminate them, and I actually don't really care.....

    2) No I do not have an ebay account. Besides, it's much more fun to make tooling.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-26-2017, 03:14 AM.
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    I think it looks darn fine. And I really like the ingenuity of the pivot for the height adjustment. It's either that or the darn loose shims that we all love to hate.....

    How large a diameter do you think you could get away with cutting before the leverage caused the the round arbor to spin in the holder? I'm guessing it's more for small items. But that still leaves lots of room for producing a wide variety of parts in a semi mass production style.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Well done. I was thinking I had seen that before somewhere, and then it dawned on me. That's my case neck turning tool!
      Handy little tool indeed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BCRider View Post
        I think it looks darn fine. And I really like the ingenuity of the pivot for the height adjustment. It's either that or the darn loose shims that we all love to hate.....

        How large a diameter do you think you could get away with cutting before the leverage caused the the round arbor to spin in the holder? I'm guessing it's more for small items. But that still leaves lots of room for producing a wide variety of parts in a semi mass production style.

        The Brown & Sharpe original has a screw in place of the pin pivot. But theirs has the cutter housed in a broached hole, which hods it against twisting. The pivot pin does not allow the tool to twist sideways. B&S do use a similar pivot on some of their box tools.

        My largest collet size is about 1/2 inch, and this will cover up to something over an inch diameter, so it will work for collet or small chucked work. The split collets that hold the tool shank are capable of pretty good grip, so I expect it can work for most any size that will fit, if cutter is kept sharp and the feed is not wrenched on like a gorilla.

        Screw machine work is often done with 12L14 or similar, that's pretty much why those alloys were developed. They cut easily enough that heavy forces are not involved. The shank is 5/8" so should give enough grab for 1/2 to 3/4" work, at least.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi,

          Nicely made tool! You are going to get a fair amount of use out of that. I like the provision for a spot drill/chamfer tool as a combo function.

          Dalee
          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

          Comment


          • #6
            I still don;t have a lever crosslide, and I am NOT gonna make that...... I can turn cranks. I do have the t-slot crosslide, so I could mount a rear tool holder as well as a near-side holder. next up may be a chamfering tool, or maybe a V-notch drill holder... making clamp bushings is a pain. I should set up to make a run of blanks.

            I was nutty enough to make the recess in this tool a different size from the other drill holders, so it will take specials. But I didn't expect to use it for much other than a center drill. I could be proved wrong on that.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is the tool adjuster part that I did not have a picture of. I may make a one-piece part for this, but for now I soldered a washer to a socket cap screw. The washer fits into a slot cut or ground into the tool shank, and then the screw can move the cutter in and out, holding position while the setscrews are tightened down.

              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                Here are some similar tool holders I made for my CNC capstan lathe.



                Last edited by wern; 03-28-2017, 03:33 PM. Reason: Mistake

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                • #9
                  Is the vertical slide for a cutter or a support?

                  Looks like a bigger shank machine, maybe 1" ?

                  Just noticed that the side tool holder rotates, I guess that is the same deal for getting it on center, or possibly for fine depth adjustment.
                  Last edited by J Tiers; 03-29-2017, 01:11 AM.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The vertical slide is for a tool, the dial is graduated in tenth of a mm. and is locked by a nut at the rear. I use 16mm shank tipped tools, so that they are always on center. I use the side tool holder mainly for a bevel tool, yes it can rotate and slide forward and back to adjust the size of the bevel. The holder also has the facility to hold a drill in the center as your holder does. My machine uses a 1 inch shank turret.

                    Werner

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                    • #11
                      Ah. Thanks for the explanation. With a 1" shank, the turret has room for all the extras at a usable size.

                      Mine is a 5/8", although a couple positions were bored out for 3/4" when I got the turret setup.

                      Nice 3-way combo tool. I like it!

                      EDIT: I had seen what appeared to be a set screw in-line with the "plug", and was wondering if that might be for a sleeve and tool. But it could have been part of what held the plate onto the shank. And now we know.....
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 03-29-2017, 02:49 PM.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                      Comment

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