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Rockerblock I.C.--Something a little different-

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  • I was mistooken!!! Before I absolutely committed to a faceplate job, I had to try it in my four jaw. What do you know----it fit, barely. One jaw is out to the point where there are only two turns of the chuck key holding it, but it cleared the ways by about half an inch and tightened up just fine. After turning the spindle by hand, checking for clearances, I started the lathe on it's lowest speed (which is very slow indeed) and seeing that nothing was going to explode in my face, I ramped the speed up to 220 rpm and cut with an HSS tool. Everything seems to have went okay, and I'm finished with that set-up.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • That bit of machining just cries out for the milling machine and the rotary table.

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      • Looks good! Mill or lathe I would say its a horse apiece on that one. I wish my lathe had more swing.
        Andy

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        • The cylinder head isn't completely finished, but it's about at 95%. Everything fits and follows the plan, so far. It is a cool, rainy, nasty day here, good time to be inside. Good wife is out in my garage rooting around thru a ton of stuff she has collected for a Parkinsons benefit yard-sale. I've machined enough today. Time to wash up and go read a good book.

          Brian Rupnow

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          • As you can see from the pictures, I haven't put the large hole in the cylinder head plate like I show in this solid model. My initial theory was that I needed a hole that big so I could reach thru to the set screws to set the cams in their proper location. I normally set the cams by turning the engine over to the correct point in the cycle with the cam gear locked to the shaft, then turn only the cam until I feel it contact the valve, then tighten the set screw. The only problem with this is that such a large hole will weaken the structural support necessary to keep the cylinder in the right location. The alternative to this is to set both cams in the correct rotational aspect to each other, leave the cam gear loose on the shaft, turn the shaft and cams to the correct position and then lock the gear to the shaft. I'm going to leave that one to "cook" for a while and in the meantime finish the cylinder, piston, and primary con-rod. By that time I will have decided what to do.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • Wow this thing is coming along fast good work Bri.

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              • Thanks, A.K. Boomer. It's nice to know that people are following my thread. Todays project (If I don't get called away to work) is the cylinder. It's worth posting a drawing, simply because it looks so strange after all the finned cylinders I have built lately. I don't remember, but I think this stuff machines fairly good. I will let you know.---Brian
                Brian Rupnow

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                • Originally posted by wendtmk View Post
                  That bit of machining just cries out for the milling machine and the rotary table.
                  Or.... a cnc mill would make short work of the entire cylinder head, probably without even changing endmills. All the labor in a part such as this gives one a real appreciation for the power of cnc.

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                  • Okay--the 316 stainless machines very nice, nicer than 1018 or 1045 steel. I'm running at 400 rpm with a .015" doc. using a brazed carbide, no cutting oil. The only issue I'm seeing so far is the fact that my brazed carbide has no chip-breaker built into it, so I'm getting some incredible "birds nests" which I clear with a pair of pliers after each pass. I'm not going to turn anymore off the o.d. until I get the bore drilled and reamed to size, then I will finish up the o.d. to finished size. I hope my hss drills have as little trouble as my brazed carbide has seen.
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • Excellent progress on another excellent build.

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                      • Thank you Doug. I'm always glad to see that people are following my posts.---Brian
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                          Thank you Doug. I'm always glad to see that people are following my posts.---Brian
                          We are !!!

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                          • Oh yes we are watching, Brian. Keep up the great work.
                            Glenn Bird

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                            • I never watch.
                              Andy

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                              • The problem with having people following your adventures, reading them, and getting invested in the creative process is that they start getting eager about daily progress. After-all, it's not their blood, sweat and tears. They just want to satisfy their own needs and desires. Soon they want a daily fix.

                                So where is my daily fix?

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