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  • Scroll roller, anything else I should consider before pulling trigger on a

    Baileigh?

    Looking at this one: http://www.baileigh.com/scroll-bender-mpb-10

    List is $295. Can be had on ebay for $305 shipped

    Others that are identical are also identical in price it seems.

    Can it or an identical one be had cheaper some where else?
    Andy

  • #2
    Then I come across this one which is also in that $300 range but has more ability.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Heavy-Duty-U...AAAOSwPcVVsTw8


    Which looks to be the same as this Baileigh: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Baileigh-Orn...HwMc02Y2eVmq2A


    Looking identical I question, is the quality the same?
    Andy

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    • #3
      What about one like this. Fairly sure I've seen a scroll die for them that go on top. or maybe I'm imagining things. I've got the blue version from princess auto, and works good for what it is. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Baileigh-Orn...3D252828281483

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      • #4
        STOP STOP Before you even think about making a scroll. Look at some scrolls that were made 150 years ago ,or more.You will notice that the curve at the beginning of the scroll gets tighter and tighter. Most so called scrolls make today have a straight section at the begining.This is not a scroll .It is an abomination. If you want to make a scroll make sure the bender will make it correctly. This may sound harsh but you asked for opinions. Edwin Dirnbeck

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        • #5
          Many years ago, I built a lot of "wrought iron" handrail. (Can you say 1970's?). My scrolls were made from 1/2" x 1/8" mild steel flatbar. I flamecut a scroll pattern from 1/2" mild steel plate, bolted it to a tabletop, and hand bent the flatbar. It worked fine, cost nothing, and gave very consistent results.--and no one ever considered the results to be abominations. A scroll is very difficult for me to draw in cad, but if you want I will make a hand drawing of the fixture and take a picture of it to post.---Brian
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Dan, I have seen that and I believe I also have seen the scroll die attachments for those as well but I don't have much use for the rest of its capabilities and it takes up more room than the scroll benders.

            Edwin, I know what you are talking about. The beefier bender I posted seems to have a radius start that might at least partially eliminate the big flat start end. I do feel it will be a hard thing to totally eliminate. Again with that beefier bender it has a couple round openings in the start are where a guy might be able to stick a rod into to get some radius on the bar. For sure the cheaper benders have a big flat start area. I also noticed that the beefier bender only seems to come with the single dies where the cheaper benders come with three different sized dies.

            Brian, I do have scroll files on hand in my cnc cutter. I can cut a "die" or the actual scroll itself out of heavy material. However it is somewhat time consuming and uses up more expensive material, unless I go the die route and then bend flat stock around the die. But that is the point of me wanting a bender in the first place. I wouldn't mind doing them by hand if I only had a few to do. But scrolls seem to be making a comeback and because my buddy owns a sign shop I get quite a few requests for them for sign brackets. Plus I feel if I had the tool I would use them more in other projects as well.

            I have been making them by hand and well, they aren't great. Also one of the reasons for wanting the tool, repeatable, great (hopefully), results.

            Andy

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            • #7
              A video, a flat start but doesn't look to bad for super thin material.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNBA84Tndx0
              Andy

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              • #8
                I was wrong about the other unit, looks like an even larger flat start area.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvhu7SVVu_Y
                Andy

                Comment


                • #9
                  So a thing. Looking at all these different types of benders it seems that there is no getting away from the flat at the beginning of the bend. But I assume there is a secret to minimizing the flat area to possibly an unnoticeable amount?

                  Edwin, by your response I am thinking you might have some insight on this? Would you mind sharing with me your thoughts on this deal?


                  As of right now this is the one that interests me the most. It has the capability and multiple die sizes. http://www.ebay.com/itm/KAKA-SBG-30-...4AAOSwA3dYIonb

                  The two things I notice with it though are like all of them, the flat start. The other thing is (from watching the video I posted earlier) the goofy turn knob for adjusting the roller/follower die outward as you bend the scroll.
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
                    STOP STOP Before you even think about making a scroll. Look at some scrolls that were made 150 years ago ,or more.You will notice that the curve at the beginning of the scroll gets tighter and tighter. Most so called scrolls make today have a straight section at the begining.This is not a scroll .It is an abomination. If you want to make a scroll make sure the bender will make it correctly. This may sound harsh but you asked for opinions. Edwin Dirnbeck
                    I agree completely. It's very amateur looking to see that straight section.

                    My scroll jig is of unknown manufacture. I bend a small arc at the start of the material prior to putting the material into the jig. As built, the jig needed that straight gripping section to hold the material from slipping during initial bending. A tapped hole with a pointed set screw contacting the inserted material tends to hold/grip the scroll in the jig without needing the long straight area.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      Many years ago, I built a lot of "wrought iron" handrail. (Can you say 1970's?). My scrolls were made from 1/2" x 1/8" mild steel flatbar. I flamecut a scroll pattern from 1/2" mild steel plate, bolted it to a tabletop, and hand bent the flatbar. It worked fine, cost nothing, and gave very consistent results.--and no one ever considered the results to be abominations. A scroll is very difficult for me to draw in cad, but if you want I will make a hand drawing of the fixture and take a picture of it to post.---Brian
                      1/2 x 1/8" flatbar, ....handrails??? The scrolls must have been a strictly decorative addition to the railing using that light a material, huh?

                      Please do post a picture of your jig.

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                      • #12
                        The way to make scrolls without flat starts is to hand-forge them.

                        metalmagpie

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                        • #13
                          If the flats bothered someone that much it would be easy to make a die with an arc in it for the clamping part at the beginning of the small scroll.
                          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                          • #14
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              I have never even tried to make any.

                              Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                              If the flats bothered someone that much it would be easy to make a die with an arc in it for the clamping part at the beginning of the small scroll.
                              However, I live with my new partner in a bungalow with scrollwork over front and side windows. Her late father did the scrollwork. She recalls quite vividly, that he heated the bars in the electric oven to red, that it took a while to get them up there, and he literally ran down the stairs to his shop holding them in tongs, and bent them to fit on a fixture which used a combination of wood blocks and metal pins mounted on a stout wood base, that his " anvil" was a piece of full size railway rail. The top inner scrolls in all the end pieces , and all of those over the front steps have straight tails about 3/4" long and are , to the eye , identical. The rest of the scrolls all appear fully curved though on close examination the "tails" are not quite identical. I guess I get to clean them up and repaint this summer. I hope this is encouraging to any one attempting this work. The overall effect is very pleasing, Regards David Powell.

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