Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oil type ID?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oil type ID?

    Got a small problem,I have some mystery oil at work that I am trying to pin down what exactly it is.

    We bought several years ago a lot at an auction that consisted to six 55 gallon drums of new oil and antifreeze.There were two drums of Texaco SultexD sulfur thread cutting oil,two drums of antifreeze and two sealed drums of mystery oil,meaning the ID stickers had washed and faded off unreadable on those two.

    It's a light amber/honey color with a faint bluish tint and about 30WT.The drums are painted blue and orange,other than that I have no clue.All this came out of a large machine and fabrication shop,so that explains the Sultex,but they also had a fairly large selection of rolling stock and maintenance which explains the antifreeze.So it's a crap shoot I figure,this could be hydraulic oil,or motor oil or spindle lube??????

    Is there anyway at a reasonable cost to get this stuff tested to find out exactly what it is?We came out smelling like a rose on the Sultex and Antifreeze and I could sell this other to the waste oil plant for $.25/gallon,but if I can identify it with some reasonable accuracy I figure 110 gallons of useable oil might be worth a keeping.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Good question and one I have never had the chance to actually deal with. If it were me my first call would be to a lab that specializes in lube oil analysis. The level of additive depletion and contamination detection is amazing these days in the field of oil sample spectrometry. Some labs are more inclusive in their results than others so check with some of the local equipment service outlets or industrial lube suppliers to get a good idea as to who is better.

    If nothing else these are the folks that would be most in the loop insofar as oil ID that I can think of and may help steer you in the right direction.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

    Location: British Columbia

    Comment


    • #3
      If the other two barrels have the shipping label, or you can determine where they were purchased, I would call them. They could possibly determine by the description of the container what the contents were, or even better they might have a copy of the original invoice.
      Mike Hunter

      www.mikehunterrestorations.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Your local fire department or environmental office would be most happy to help. It's their business.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Guido View Post
          Your local fire department or environmental office would be most happy to help. It's their business.
          That could open a very expensive can of worms!

          I use Titan Labs in Denver CO for engine oil analysis. They can at least give you a physical and chemical analysis of the oil. Then you could try to match it up to the spec's of known oils.

          Comment


          • #6
            Try it in your bosses truck.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Guido View Post
              Your local fire department or environmental office would be most happy to help. It's their business.
              fire dept./environmental office will tell you where you can get rid of it, but won't be able to tell you what it is.

              Comment


              • #8
                fire dept./environmental office will tell you where you can get rid of it, but won't be able to tell you what it is.

                Around these parts, fire/rescue people will isolate obviously unwanted, unknown material until identified and removed/disposed by licensed haz-mat handlers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Frank K View Post
                  They can at least give you a physical and chemical analysis of the oil.
                  That will also let you know if its contaminated from sitting around for years with water, grit and dust from grinders, rust, well meaning gasoline "sta-bil", who knows what got in there over the years.

                  Analysis is really cheap compared to just one replacement bearing... If you sell it you'll make a huge profit off something analyzed vs advertising it as "we think its oil"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vincemulhollon View Post
                    That will also let you know if its contaminated from sitting around for years with water, grit and dust from grinders, rust, well meaning gasoline "sta-bil", who knows what got in there over the years.

                    Analysis is really cheap compared to just one replacement bearing... If you sell it you'll make a huge profit off something analyzed vs advertising it as "we think its oil"
                    " and two sealed drums of mystery oil"

                    Contamination shouldn't be a problem.

                    Blackstone Labs is a well respected oil analysis house that I've used in the past.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All you need is a sticker and the oil becomes anything you want it to be...

                      Seriously though, an oil analysis is the only way to go. It's a selling point in that you can wave it in front of the buyer's eyes as proof of what's in the barrel. It might have started out a a particular oil, but additive packages have been know to settle out of oil with time and an oil analysis will catch that.
                      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
                        " and two sealed drums of mystery oil"

                        Contamination shouldn't be a problem.

                        Blackstone Labs is a well respected oil analysis house that I've used in the past.

                        For the most part this is correct. However if the drums have been stored outside incorrectly water could still be a very real source of contamination.
                        If they have not been placed on their sides or if standing upright, not placed at an angle with the bung holes properly located so that any rain water does not collect near them, water will have likely have entered the drum. Drums placed outside so that rain water collects inside the rim during storage will undergo positive internal pressure when warm and a vacuum when cold. These cyclic pressure changes almost always draw moisture inside past the seals on the bungs given enough time. In all likelihood it won't be an emulsion but it's possible presence must taken into account.
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The oil analysis sound like a great idea, BUT that is not what those folks really do. They analyze oil from engines and gearboxes, to see what contaminates are in it, and answer "is this oil any good, is there a lot of wear on the machine?".

                          It is not as if they put it through and say "it's Mobil XYZ oil with x amount of bearing metal contamination". The metal, sure, the Mobil XYX, not so much. So it may not be that very useful to get the analysis, it does not answer what you want to know.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            The oil analysis sound like a great idea, BUT that is not what those folks really do. They analyze oil from engines and gearboxes, to see what contaminates are in it, and answer "is this oil any good, is there a lot of wear on the machine?".

                            It is not as if they put it through and say "it's Mobil XYZ oil with x amount of bearing metal contamination". The metal, sure, the Mobil XYX, not so much. So it may not be that very useful to get the analysis, it does not answer what you want to know.
                            That what I was also thinking. You get viscosity and Maybe you can fiqure out if its more likely engine oil or hydraulic oil from amount of zinc and phosphorous additives.

                            Way oil you might be able to identify just by dipping your finger in there and rubbing them together. Start with couple of known samples. Or place a drop of each oil on vertical steel/glass surface and see how the oil sticks to it on the next day.
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              The oil analysis sound like a great idea, BUT that is not what those folks really do. They analyze oil from engines and gearboxes, to see what contaminates are in it, and answer "is this oil any good, is there a lot of wear on the machine?".

                              It is not as if they put it through and say "it's Mobil XYZ oil with x amount of bearing metal contamination". The metal, sure, the Mobil XYX, not so much. So it may not be that very useful to get the analysis, it does not answer what you want to know.
                              This is true up to a point.
                              When sending in samples of an oil to be analyzed labs require as much information as possible. They want to know exactly what type, and brand of oil they are dealing with as each one has a somewhat unique fingerprint insofar as additive package, base oil, etc. This combined with the number of hours in service, makeup oil added, and the exact component or engine the oil was used in all help to give the lab a more precise and detailed equipment health report.

                              They will not be able to pin point with certainty exactly what the oil is exactly, however they should be able to narrow down the possible range considerably by not only viscosity but also type. As I mentioned in a previous post, oil analysis labs in my experience vary considerably in the depth of their reports. So as usual it pays to shop around.

                              If the lab told me the sample was a 15w40 diesel engine oil, would I use it in a $40,000 engine? No, but at least it would open up some options.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X