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15MM Tap......Drill Size

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  • #46
    Is there a metric fastener equal to NAS?

    Originally posted by Highpower View Post
    How do the heavy jets get serviced in Thailand?


    Metrification is not standardization. And I'm a bit put off that only the coarsest threads in metric are standard, while nearly ALL the metric threads seen on today's automobiles are FINE and so special. What sort of standard is that?

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    • #47
      Originally posted by CalM View Post
      What sort of standard is that?
      They might not all be "on the list" but even "non-standard" metric threads do conform to a standard ;-)
      If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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      • #48
        Originally posted by CalM View Post
        Metrification is not standardization. And I'm a bit put off that only the coarsest threads in metric are standard, while nearly ALL the metric threads seen on today's automobiles are FINE and so special. What sort of standard is that?
        Where did you get that only coarsest are standard?
        Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
          Where did you get that only coarsest are standard?
          Maybe his Home Depot had only coarse thread available?

          Only real bastard wildcat threads are on some milling machine or lathe collets, like 1,66666mm pitch.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • #50
            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
            Maybe his Home Depot had only coarse thread available?

            Only real bastard wildcat threads are on some milling machine or lathe collets, like 1,66666mm pitch.
            Or threads used in some gun silencers. I remember one that was 8.4 mm OD and some really oddball fine thread with a no-standard crestform. Talk about vendor lockin...
            Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by CalM View Post
              How do the heavy jets get serviced in Thailand?
              I have no idea. I've only serviced jets in the US - and we used lbs. for fuel measurement. (USAF '75 - '80 / 43131)
              The point of my link was to illustrate what can happen when you mix systems as Forrest was saying.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                What is the tap drill for a 3/8 - 16 thread? Well a 16 tpi is 1/16 of an inch pitch and 3/8" - 1/16" is 5/16 Well how about that . If you can't do that you probably shouldn't be trusted with any power tools.
                ...lew...
                Great! Now do it for a 1/2-13 thread. or 1/4-28.....

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by andywander View Post
                  Great! Now do it for a 1/2-13 thread. or 1/4-28.....
                  Sure.
                  1/2-13 becomes 1/2 - 1/13 which equals 13/26 - 2/26 which gives you 11/26.
                  1/4-28 becomes 1/4 - 1/28 which equals 7/28 - 1/28 which gives you 6/28 and reduces to 3/14.
                  Happy?
                  Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by RichR View Post
                    Sure.
                    1/2-13 becomes 1/2 - 1/13 which equals 13/26 - 2/26 which gives you 11/26.
                    1/4-28 becomes 1/4 - 1/28 which equals 7/28 - 1/28 which gives you 6/28 and reduces to 3/14.
                    Happy?
                    Very happy-you proved my point perfectly.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by andywander View Post
                      Very happy-you proved my point perfectly.
                      Gimme the chart.
                      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                      Lewis Grizzard

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by andywander View Post
                        Very happy-you proved my point perfectly.
                        What was your point? That it's an easy system, or that it isn't?

                        It seems really simple to me. If a guy can't divide 11 by 26 on a calculator and find the nearest matching drill bit size, he should probably avoid machining.

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                        • #57
                          Ignorant + Lazy = Stupid

                          Anyone want to check my math?

                          -Doozer
                          DZER

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                          • #58
                            Maybe machining is not for everybody.. You have to think a lot of the time, and do math often..
                            There are many other hobbies out there..

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by 754 View Post
                              Maybe machining is not for everybody.. You have to think a lot of the time, and do math often..
                              There are many other hobbies out there..
                              The telephone company (AT&T) was once known for extremely high work quality. One of the key components of that quality was that they did not want workers to rely on memory for anything complex or that workers did infrequently. Charts and checklists and procedures abounded. In the machining world we have the Machinerys Handbook for charts, formulas and procedures.

                              You don't need to do math quickly to be a hobby machinist. There's plenty of time to look up a formula, look at a chart or run some numbers through a calculator. There's nothing wrong with grabbing a cell phone to look up the right info for the job at hand.
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Yondering View Post
                                What was your point? That it's an easy system, or that it isn't?

                                It seems really simple to me. If a guy can't divide 11 by 26 on a calculator and find the nearest matching drill bit size, he should probably avoid machining.
                                My point was that the original easy-to-do-in-your-head example given, which involved only 16ths of an inch, was not representative of most of the imperial threads that would be encountered, which are more difficult to figure out than the metric ones, because you need to convert TPI to pitch. A calculator would be handy, as you point out.

                                Or just use a chart......

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