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  • Protecting knee mill table top

    What are some of ways you protect the table of your knee mill? This short video shows how I have been doing it for decades. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJSwRMEhH1o
    This is one of the things my father taught me when I first started the trade and I have used it ever since. It is simple an cheap. Are there other ways you guys use? This old dog is always ready to learn new things.

    Steve

  • #2
    I've never used anything up to now. I just don't put things onto the table. And I made a T slot cleaner. Never really thought about it. But after seeing a lot of the You Toobers using covers that are the same or closely similar to yours I'm thinking it's not a bad idea. Just need a "round tuit".....

    I've got some offcuts of 1/8" HDPE from the cutting table mat material I bought a few years ago. I might use that since it won't be affected by oil over time like the hardboard will do. Not that the hardboard isn't cheap and easily replaced. And there's nothing wrong with a little oil soaked into the hardboard.

    Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Hi BCRider,

      "Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it."

      That is a good idea. I never thought of that. I am always looking for a piece of paper to jot down some numbers.

      Steve

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      • #4
        I keep 1/6" neoprene sheets on the mill table - easy to shake clean, and with them hanging over the edges, they shed chips and allow me to use the air hose to blow things off with no chance of driving dirt or anything onto or into the ways. I do a fair bit of wood milling, so I have similar oversize neoprene shrouds over everything else, including the DRO scales. Never even a need to set up anything to change from wood, plastic, steel, or whatever:

        Cheers,

        Frank Ford
        HomeShopTech

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        • #5
          I have been using plastic covers. The problem with them is hot chips stick to them. My next set will be aluminum

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            .....
            Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it.
            I like it! like this:
            http://www.homedepot.com/p/Marker-Bo...2090/203377708

            Ken

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            • #7
              Originally posted by KMoffett View Post
              Another product they have in the US HD's but not up here. Oh well, not a big deal. I could get it in Bellingham and combine the day with a trip to the Grizzly showroom. It's about the same drive as going into the Big Smoke that is Greater Vancouver.

              I was thinking that cheap hardboard with black board paint would allow us to use chalk. But the oil flecks over time would likely make it a mess. At least the glossy white board material could be washed with a good detergent like Fantastic to clean away any oil.
              Last edited by BCRider; 04-29-2017, 06:18 PM.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Viperspit View Post
                What are some of ways you protect the table of your knee mill? This short video shows how I have been doing it for decades. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJSwRMEhH1o
                Another YouTube content provider. I've subscribed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dan_the_Chemist View Post
                  Another YouTube content provider. I've subscribed.
                  Thanks Dan,

                  Hopefully tomorrow We will have another video on surface grinding thin stock flat using paper towels. We already filmed the video we just need to edit and upload it. This YouTube thing is new to us we hope to get better with practice. It still feels strange talking to a camera.

                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Viperspit View Post
                    ..... It still feels strange talking to a camera.

                    Steve
                    You are not talking to it, you are talking THROUGH it. Just like giving a sales presentation, except that the audience is standing on the other side of the camera.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #11
                      Hi Viperspit ...

                      Like your vids .. but .. I do have a suggestion.

                      I notice a LOT of your vids are like 15min long. Nothing wrong with that, but it feels like you are stretching
                      some vids out to get to this length.

                      This ways cover vid for instance, great info !!! but you could have made a well paced vid that was only 5 min
                      covering most everything you did.

                      Absolutely nothing wrong with vids that are only 5 min long. Maybe try it.
                      John Titor, when are you.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
                        Hi Viperspit ...

                        Like your vids .. but .. I do have a suggestion.

                        I notice a LOT of your vids are like 15min long. Nothing wrong with that, but it feels like you are stretching
                        some vids out to get to this length.

                        This ways cover vid for instance, great info !!! but you could have made a well paced vid that was only 5 min
                        covering most everything you did.

                        Absolutely nothing wrong with vids that are only 5 min long. Maybe try it.
                        Hi Mike,

                        Thanks for the advice. We are new at this an trying to get the hang of it. I know it will be hard to please everyone. Some will want less information and some will want more. Some will want beginner topics and some will want more advance topics. We hope to find a balance that most will be satisfied with that is why I appreciate the feedback. Thanks for watching.

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Viperspit View Post
                          Hopefully tomorrow We will have another video on surface grinding thin stock flat using paper towels.
                          Great. I can't afford a surface grinder but I have paper towels. I look forward to learning how to use them to grind stock flat !!!

                          What? Oh?

                          Nevermind...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Mike A. has a good point. Before my retirement, I was a video producer for the website of a major newspaper. We found that the attention span of people on web videos is very brief. You have to get their attention in the first 20 seconds and anything longer than 3-4 minutes total will finding people clicking off your work early. Some ideas from experience: Plan your shots, plan your narration. Be concise. Edit out bobbles, long pauses, and needless repetition. Titles if any should be very brief (I've seen Youtube pieces with 45 second intros that added nothing to the content). You aren't talking to the camera, you are talking to an unseen observer in your shop, so to speak. Good audio is 70% of a good video. Good lighting is a given. A variety of shots (wide, medium, close-up) keeps the pace going. Best wishes!

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                            • #15
                              Pacing and length of videos is a key factor in keeping subscribers.

                              Examples of EXCELLENT videos for pacing and content and providing clear yet concise methods and explanations are Clickspring, This Old Tony, and the early Keith Fenner "Turn Wright Machine Works" videos. I find Keith's recent video postings are long winded and he no longer uses skips or fast forward for the actual machining. And as a result I skip through to try to find the gems among the filler where before I'd watch the whole video in real time.

                              Examples like Tubalcain "Mr Pete 222" are mostly well paced and highly informative and the odd digression to some old story quite entertaining. But even he has a miss now and then. On the other hand I simply can't watch any of the Randy Richards videos without skipping through them as he's incredibly long winded about stuff not related to the topic or explains and repeats information in infinite detail well past the point of needlessness. A shame too as the projects are wonderfully done. So his videos, when I do watch them, are skipped through to where I only watch about 1/4 of the material. And that's still enough for the full picture.

                              Don't be afraid to show the actual machining. But do speed it up. Cut back to real time for the explanations and I'd say keep them short. Sure, beginners do need more. But do that by giving them less in the form of smaller bites of the material so you can keep the talking about the smaller "portion" short. And then do multiple videos to put it all together rather than one longer one that goes on and on.

                              At least that's how I feel about them.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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