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I Just Bought A Rockwell 21-100 Milling Machine

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  • I Just Bought A Rockwell 21-100 Milling Machine

    Yesterday, I bought a Rockwell model #21-100 milling machine, from a ASME boiler contractor, I've dealt with for the past 40+ years. The mill is a small knee mill, has a 6-1/2" x 24" table, a R8 spindle, 5 speeds. It originally came out of a vocation school, where it sat basically unused, for about 30 years, except for a few class demos, it was then sold to the contractor, where it has sat for another 10 years, in shrink wrap. I unwrapped it on Tuesday, ran the table back and forth and the knee up and down, seems very smooth, some slight surface rust on the otherwise pristine table. The unit needs some TLC. No tooling, just the mill for $500. Its suppose to be delivered on next Tuesday.
    jack

  • #2
    Have one just like it. You got a great mill with a small foot print at a very good price.

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    • #3
      congrats, that's a great sized home shop mill and you got it for a song, even before the low use is factored in!

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      • #4
        I've seen them sell for $2K needing work.

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        • #5
          That is definitely a "you suck".

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          • #6
            Definitely a "you suck".
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #7
              Congratulations on that purchase. I can't say you stole it, as most likely both parties were in agreement about the mill changing ownership, but you definitely got much more than you paid for. "Wheels17" is right, those things will fetch near 2K even if needing some work, or lack tooling. The tooling is easy enough to come by though, which is a great advantage with the R8 spindle. The only "wish it were better" observation I've had about the 21-100 is the amount of quill travel. Also, double check on the spindle speeds on yours. There should be 6 speed steps on the pulleys, and a choice of overall speed ranges depend on whether it's a 1725rpm motor or a 1140rpm motor. Oh, and, yeah "you suck"!

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              • #8
                ...and the pictures are WHERE!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jmarkwolf View Post
                  ...and the pictures are WHERE!
                  What jmark said! (and J Tiers as well for that matter)

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                  • #10
                    I'll post some pictures, after its delivered
                    jack

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                    • #11
                      I have one of these in very nice condition, and well tooled. My only complaints are the short quill, and it's too high speed for me--I have the 1725 single phase motor. Gave $1200 for it, came with a new 4" import swivel vise and a few collets.

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                      • #12
                        I have had one since about 93 that I paid $750 for, but it had a big rotary table, Bridgeport vise with a swivel base, and a few collets. The only thing I don't like about is that I can't swivel the head around so the quill isn't over the table. I made a double reduction conversion for mine. I mounted the motor pulley on a swing arm and moved the motor back and put a step pulley on it to drive the idler. The motor sits at the same height on a frame work I made to replace the cast aluminum motor mount. The idler swings on a pivot between the motor and the quill. Now I can get down to around 80 or 90 rpm for fly cutting or hole saws. And it is useful for larger endmills. Also a year or so after I got mine I took it apart and added grease to all the bearings. It has been a good mill.

                        It's interesting to hear you folks think I could bet $2000 for it. For that I could start looking for a Bridgeport or some such. I have thought of doing that but so far haven't got around to it. I didn't think the Rockwells were worth that much.

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                        • #13
                          For me the value was the condition, 110v motor, and the fact it was easily broken down into large parts that were easy for me to move. It would be easy to get one into say a basement, or similar location that a larger machine would be a bear to move to. I am sure I could get $2k or more in my locale, especially with the tooling that I've added.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wdtom44 View Post
                            I have had one since about 93 that I paid $750 for, but it had a big rotary table, Bridgeport vise with a swivel base, and a few collets. The only thing I don't like about is that I can't swivel the head around so the quill isn't over the table. I made a double reduction conversion for mine. I mounted the motor pulley on a swing arm and moved the motor back and put a step pulley on it to drive the idler. The motor sits at the same height on a frame work I made to replace the cast aluminum motor mount. The idler swings on a pivot between the motor and the quill. Now I can get down to around 80 or 90 rpm for fly cutting or hole saws. And it is useful for larger endmills. Also a year or so after I got mine I took it apart and added grease to all the bearings. It has been a good mill.

                            It's interesting to hear you folks think I could bet $2000 for it. For that I could start looking for a Bridgeport or some such. I have thought of doing that but so far haven't got around to it. I didn't think the Rockwells were worth that much.
                            In addition to geographic location, a substantial part of the Rockwell pricing is that they are one of the best built machines out there that can be separated into pieces small enough to transport down the basement staircase. There are people out there, myself included, who pay the premium for smaller machines simply because there are no other options, short of selling out and moving to a more shop friendly location. Even if I had a way to get the Bridgeport into the cellar, the ceiling height is to low for the motor, never mind trying to get the draw bar out.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                              In addition to geographic location, a substantial part of the Rockwell pricing is that they are one of the best built machines out there that can be separated into pieces small enough to transport down the basement staircase. There are people out there, myself included, who pay the premium for smaller machines simply because there are no other options, short of selling out and moving to a more shop friendly location. Even if I had a way to get the Bridgeport into the cellar, the ceiling height is to low for the motor, never mind trying to get the draw bar out.
                              The new coffee table you built is crowding the couch rather, could we move it out by a foot? Nope!

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