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Mounting Bison Set-Tru Chuck

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  • #61
    indicator, tap tap tap. Rinse and repeat til satisfied

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    • #62
      Originally posted by adamsgt View Post
      I mounted the faceplate once and IIRC it did not mount flush either. I'll check it one more time. That said, I have never used a faceplate and have no idea of how to attach items to it that facilitate centering the item. I've been searching on you tube but haven't found anything helpful.
      Mount the faceplate, check with a tenths indicator. If it's not dead on take a skim cut, if the cut looks like it's too much mount a sacrificial plate and skim that. The important thing is that the mount is dead on to the cross slide travel (you might want to check things after the skim cut with a straightedge, making sure that your cross slide travel is reasonably perpendicular to the spindle axis, a thousandth or so concave across 10" isn't bad and concave is better than convex).

      Clean both mounting surfaces with a stone to remove high spots and burrs, and mount the back plate with the chuck side against the faceplate. Like the other poster said tap it into alignment - I usually clamp pretty lightly until I'm around a thousandth, then clamp a little harder, then tap in slowly. You have plenty of time here. Use a soft face hammer - I like lead but brass or bronze will work as well. When it's concentric clamp it in.

      Indicating the angle with the compound can be more finicky than centering the back plate, but again try clamping the screws a little, tap in, clamp a little, etc. When you think you have it move the compound out of contact and back in a recheck on a different area of the taper and a different area of the indicator. If it matches you're good to cut.

      To make the first cut mount an indicator on the lathe bed way indicating the carriage and sneak up on the cut. Have your gibs tightened up some, you don't want slackness getting into the movement so take the slack out of the cross slide. When you think you're ready take the cutter close enough that you're getting a little dust, then use the compound. If you think it's just polishing the taper you're in the ballpark. Remember, if the faceplate mounts OK you should be able to take it off and remount it and be back within a few tenths.

      You should have about .008 change in depth for every .001 taken off the taper, so you want something like .0007 for .005 clearance as you are measuring. If you take too much off don't sweat it, just take a little off the flat back to make up for it (if you can measure things you want the widest part of the taper at the top for be 2.1250"). If you do take something off the top be sure that you don't go to a depth less than 1/2" - I'd throw some plastigage in there to check the clearance if the mic said I was close.

      Really, in the end you'll be surprised at 2 things. 1) Just how freaking long it took to setup for a cut and 2) how little time you actually spent on the cut.

      Attached is a pic of the back end of a collet chuck I made from dura bar with a D1-3 back. It's not hard work, just finicky.

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      • #63
        Almost there

        Taking longer than I planned due to some family trips. However, I'm getting close. Started with about 11 thou run out on the adapter and I'm now down to about three tenths. Randy Perkowski gave me a good suggestion to put the adapter in the three jaw and use abrasive to take off the excess off the taper. I cut some pieces of 1/2 dowel and wrapped some 240 grit cloth around it and ran the lathe at about 70 rpm. Tedious but it's getting me there. One more session should do it.
        Jerry Adams
        Fort Worth Texas

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        • #64
          Success

          Now there is no discernible run out on the adapter. Mounted the chuck on the adapter. So I now have to learn how to use the set-tru feature. Shouldn't take too long. Just a little different in that the adjusting screws aren't 90 degrees apart and the screws pull rather than push
          Jerry Adams
          Fort Worth Texas

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          • #65
            They screws pull? not on mine... Loosen one side (fraction of a turn), push tight with the opposite.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
              They screws pull? not on mine... Loosen one side (fraction of a turn), push tight with the opposite.
              I'm always ready to stand corrected. My impression is that when you turn the adjustment screw clockwise it pushes against the center hub and pulls the chuck away from the hub. With a four jaw you push the work piece away when you turn the adjustment screw clockwise. I guess depending on your point of reference a push can be a pull and vise versa. I haven't started playing with it yet so I'll find out soon. If I'm wrong it won"t be the first time I've been 180 degrees out.

              Visited the you tube video by Joe Pieczynski on indicating where he discusses this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU6pVSixjv0
              Last edited by adamsgt; 06-08-2017, 09:58 PM. Reason: added link
              Jerry Adams
              Fort Worth Texas

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              • #67
                I think it's semantics. Yes... it pushes on the center hub which pushes the body away from the hub.

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