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  • #16
    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    Why in the world would anyone with a home shop need that?


    In my garage I have 5 hout cabinets..... taps / endmills / letter / number / fractional drills LOL.

    We have issues HAHAHAHAHAH
    HA! If you have to ask, you wouldn't understand...

    And being that you are two cabinets ahead of me, clearly I am the "normal" one here.

    Comment


    • #17
      You could have bought a metric drill set 1-10mm by 0.1mm and 10-13mm by 0,5 mm and have all the sizes you will ever need and a lot cheaper. Instead you paid for many drills that are exactly the same size or just 0.001" to 0.002" apart. Why would anybody buy # drills, letter drills and fractional drill sets. If you need a metric tap drill for a inch size tap than get a metric tap drill chart for inch threads just like you have a inch tap drill chart. Now you have a lot of drills. Hope you have a lot of holes to drill. Absolutely wasted money.
      http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-tap-metric.htm

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Juergenwt View Post
        You could have bought a metric drill set 1-10mm by 0.1mm and 10-13mm by 0,5 mm and have all the sizes you will ever need and a lot cheaper. Instead you paid for many drills that are exactly the same size or just 0.001" to 0.002" apart. Why would anybody buy # drills, letter drills and fractional drill sets. If you need a metric tap drill for a inch size tap than get a metric tap drill chart for inch threads just like you have a inch tap drill chart. Now you have a lot of drills. Hope you have a lot of holes to drill. Absolutely wasted money.
        http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-tap-metric.htm

        That's an interesting approach, though I don't ever recall any commercial machine shop I've been in substituting the closest metric sized bit for every hole they need to drill. But it does make some sense if you are trying to minimize the total number of bits you keep, and it's an approach that never occurred to me.

        But that aside, while what you outline certainly would work, the main reason I bought this instead was that nobody was offering to sell me a bunch of metric sets like you describe for a fraction of retail cost. A quick look seems to say that to buy the sets you outline would cost me maybe 4-500 bucks or more to get one bit of each size in indexes.

        Are there some sizes I won't use? No doubt there are but, so what?. This is a hobby for me and as such "value" is very, very subjective. In strict terms every thing in my shop is wasted money as it rarely returns any monetary value for the investments made. That is by design. I never seek paying work, I have a full time job for that. I buy this stuff for the same reason I might buy a piece of artwork, a book, or a knickknack: just because I want it. When I use my wasted machines to make some doo-dad that my grandkids have a bunch of fun with, I get more than enough return to offset the "absolutely wasted money" I have sunk into my shop. These are just another piece of that. No waste at all from where I stand.

        I guess the flip side is that with that chart you linked to I'll never need to buy a metric tap drill, I'll just use the fractional, letter or number drill called out on the chart.
        Last edited by alanganes; 05-15-2017, 07:34 AM.

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        • #19
          You could get your drills for "free" if you put together some sets and put them in indexes and sell them. Even if you had to buy a few drills for the sizes you have none or few of you could make back enough to probably pay for your drills and still have a complete set of a few spares each.

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          • #20
            I dont consider drill bits to be a waste of money. The broken jet ski I bought to fix that still has yet to be worked on was a waste. The boat I was working on and have yet to finish would be a waste.

            I know all about waste lol

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Juergenwt View Post
              You could have bought a metric drill set 1-10mm by 0.1mm and 10-13mm by 0,5 mm and have all the sizes you will ever need and a lot cheaper. Instead you paid for many drills that are exactly the same size or just 0.001" to 0.002" apart. Why would anybody buy # drills, letter drills and fractional drill sets. If you need a metric tap drill for a inch size tap than get a metric tap drill chart for inch threads just like you have a inch tap drill chart. Now you have a lot of drills. Hope you have a lot of holes to drill. Absolutely wasted money.
              http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-tap-metric.htm
              While I have LOT of drills, and paid far less than the OP for them (but did not get any fancy index drawers), I think the "wasted money" is a silly comment. And there is a good deal less close overlap than you seem to think. Yes, many small drills in the under 1 mm area differ by small amounts, but as a percentage of diameter it looks a bit different.

              Then also, when considering standard thread sizes, a couple thou can make rather a large difference in thread percentage in the higher TPI pitches that go with those sizes. Consider a 2-56 thread, for instance. The pitch itself is only a half mm. So a tenth of a mm difference is rather a large engagement percentage difference.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by alanganes View Post
                Magpie, I do have a Darex, I have the M4 and a point splitter and one diamond wheel that I pieced together over a few years along with an old grinder. So I have essentially an M5 that I find pretty effective and most useful. I have not mastered doing really small bits with it, though I have not tried all that hard as they are generally easier to just replace when the get really dull or break or just touch up by hand if they are not in too bad shape. I do wish I had the 1/2-3/4 chuck for it, but they consistently sell for more than I'm willing to spend..
                A year ago Darex still had a few of the 1/2-3/4" chucks in stock, new, my price was $284 including shipping. A whole lot cheaper than ebay. I use the heck out of it too. It is well worth reading the section in their manual that talks about occasionally opening up their chucks, blowing them out and lightly lubricating them. Once they sieze they are often scrap. And they aren't making any more so we have to take care of the ones we have.

                metalmagpie

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                  Magpie,
                  I got a Black Diamond from the junkyard! It had every collet from 1/16" to 3/4" none were missing. Two things wrong, the splitter casting was broken, and the main bushing that holds the chuck was sloppy. But then I paid $189 for it, and the factory had the parts for another $300. The price for this model was about $7500, so not too bad a deal.
                  They had the point splitter casting? They sure don't anymore, sigh. You got very lucky. And as far as point splitting, with care it can be done well by hand, much easier than correctly grinding the drill itself. So I'll try to get along without it. Your 3B can also do drills up to 3/4" and my 2B can only go up to 1/2". So for damn sure you suck bigtime!

                  metalmagpie

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                    A year ago Darex still had a few of the 1/2-3/4" chucks in stock, new, my price was $284 including shipping. A whole lot cheaper than ebay. I use the heck out of it too. It is well worth reading the section in their manual that talks about occasionally opening up their chucks, blowing them out and lightly lubricating them. Once they sieze they are often scrap. And they aren't making any more so we have to take care of the ones we have.

                    metalmagpie
                    I do try to clean the chuck I have periodically. They do accumulate a lot of crud. I'm not doing the sort of volume that a real shop would do, so I expect this to last longer than I'll be needing it. I didn't know they still had some chucks but you're right that is less than I see them on ebay and such for when I bother to look. I am still thinking I may just set up fixturing to do four-facet grinds on my T&C grinder for the larger stuff and just sidestep the whole issue. Yet another on the list of stuff to get to. All in good time I guess.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by alanganes View Post
                      That's an interesting approach, though I don't ever recall any commercial machine shop I've been in substituting the closest metric sized bit for every hole they need to drill. But it does make some sense if you are trying to minimize the total number of bits you keep, and it's an approach that never occurred to me.

                      But that aside, while what you outline certainly would work, the main reason I bought this instead was that nobody was offering to sell me a bunch of metric sets like you describe for a fraction of retail cost. A quick look seems to say that to buy the sets you outline would cost me maybe 4-500 bucks or more to get one bit of each size in indexes.

                      Are there some sizes I won't use? No doubt there are but, so what?. This is a hobby for me and as such "value" is very, very subjective. In strict terms every thing in my shop is wasted money as it rarely returns any monetary value for the investments made. That is by design. I never seek paying work, I have a full time job for that. I buy this stuff for the same reason I might buy a piece of artwork, a book, or a knickknack: just because I want it. When I use my wasted machines to make some doo-dad that my grandkids have a bunch of fun with, I get more than enough return to offset the "absolutely wasted money" I have sunk into my shop. These are just another piece of that. No waste at all from where I stand.

                      I guess the flip side is that with that chart you linked to I'll never need to buy a metric tap drill, I'll just use the fractional, letter or number drill called out on the chart.
                      Enjoy your hobby and I hope your grand children will have a lot of fun using grandpa's toys.

                      Comment

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