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  • Doozer
    replied
    I do remember in another one of Brian's videos,
    he lifts his tractor up with the newly installed crane
    just a few inches off the ground. It was something
    like a 9000 pound tractor. So he did have some
    test going on. But rightly so, replace rusty cable.
    I would not really thought it being a huge issue,
    but I for sure will consider it now, if I ever get to
    working on something with rusty cable.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • RPM22
    replied
    The story behind the satellite crash is staggering - who knew that Murphy works for NASA? When satellites are being created, they are mounted to the white machine, which is a tilt mechanism so the satellite can be worked on horizontally - ie in its flight attitude. Another crew were attaching another satellite to another tilt mechanism, found they were short of bolts to do this, so borrowed the bolts from the satellite in the picture- and did not put them back. Normally these bolts would stay with each satellite until it removed for launching. The satellite was in its vertical attitude, resting on the platform of the tilt mechanism, and the assembly crew came in to do the next stage which needed the satellite horizontal. Nobody expected the bolts to be missing, so nobody checked that they were still there - the tilt mechanism could be operated by one guy pressing a button - perhaps the rest of the team went for coffee - came back and it was on the floor - I can imagine what was going through the guys mind doing the tilting when it fell off :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by pinstripe View Post
    Notice that he moved away after it hit the floor. Never assume that you will be fast enough to react in time if something goes wrong.
    Yes,that's the one thing I don't like about manual chain hoists,your'e the first one on the scene in an accident.I would rather be mashing buttons on the end of a long pendant or even better at the end of a radio.

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I do too - I did not watch the second half until yesterday and have to say the same thing,
    all you can do is learn from his mistake and have a little empathy for the man.
    agreed

    Will make me think more when i'm loading or unloading heavy objects. could you imaging what would have happened if it had been dropped on the trailer.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Glug View Post
    I have a lot of respect for this guy, because he put his mistake out for the entire world to see and benefit from. That took big balls. He obviously did it to prevent others from suffering similarly - or much worse.
    I do too - I did not watch the second half until yesterday and have to say the same thing,
    all you can do is learn from his mistake and have a little empathy for the man.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glug
    replied
    I have a lot of respect for this guy, because he put his mistake out for the entire world to see and benefit from. That took big balls. He obviously did it to prevent others from suffering similarly - or much worse.

    Normally I'd say he should have had a spotter. But I don't see how it would have made any difference. Might have even been hurt. Though I'd still say a spotter is strongly encouraged when moving anything this large.

    If the drill had cocked sideways when falling, it might have hit the edge of the trailer and tipped. That could have greatly enlarged the crush zone. It could have also fallen when still partially above the trailer.

    You do see in the video, going frame by frame, how the thing is pretty much already on the ground before he has barely even flinched. Even outside of the drop zone, he could have been hit by straps or chains releasing. That big hook could crush your skull. It seems almost comical to think a helmet could save your life when lifting a big drill, but here you go.

    With all of the energy being released by the concrete beaking, I suppose there was also some risk of pieces hitting someone in the face and blinding them.

    And that big motor. If anyone had been anywhere in the line of the head, that motor and its parts could have broken off and hit them. It was very close to coming off like a bowling ball in that direction. You could have been 5 or 10 feet away and still been smeared.

    When I first started watching, I was really looking at those straps and thought that might be what would fail. The white strap looks like it might be a pretty decent rigging strap, with the sleeve. But that yellow one, I'm not so sure about. It appears to be thin, almost like a cheap ratchet strap. I also have concerns about sharp edges on the straps, and lack of apparent effort to cushion edges.

    He had many single points of failure in the straps. Of course if you use chains to back up the straps, if the strap breaks, then the shock of hitting the chain might break other stuff. So your redundant chain may actually just give false confidence that the load is safer than it is.

    Having an awesome gantry crane like that, with such a high rating, can really give you false confidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
    He works for a large John Deere dealer in Kentucky, does a little farming and also runs his shop. I've talked with him several times and what you see is what you get. He's not pissing away money on fancy trucks or cars or cloths. His money is in the farm and the shop.

    Well you learn something new every day. Funny a guy with a masters in engineering working as a John Deere dealer. I guess if you are happy thats all that counts.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    That is unbelievable negligence on both accounts --- yes esp. the first guy but also the others as simple stuff in plain sight was missed on such a critical thing.

    There's a real scary "mindset" that happens when multiple groups decide to build something very complex, people get brainwashed into just following protocol and as long as they are doing just what they are "supposed to do" and checking their list off then all's good. Not...

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun God
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    daym ---- looks like someone was testing that "tilt actuator" when they should not have been, or it went off accidentally?

    I do wonder what the story is behind that one...
    Long story short, somebody took the bolts that held it to the white machine out, and didn't write up the job. Another group came along to tip the satellite horizontal again to move it, didn't check whether the bolts were in (because the last guy didn't write up the job), and the satellite fell over.

    Leave a comment:


  • pinstripe
    replied
    Notice that he moved away after it hit the floor. Never assume that you will be fast enough to react in time if something goes wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • softtail
    replied
    That whole setup looks sketchy across the internet... so fwiw. I have a wider streak of self preservation that some. I try to visualize a worst case scenario and place my body well away from that zone if possible.

    I recently took ownership of an electric overhead chain hoist. The catch was I had to remove it from the I beam alone and with no equipment so I looped the chain over the I beam, removed the guards on the end of the beam, pushed of the hoist which swung down and then caught on it's own chain... lowered it down into the truck. The pushing off the I beam was a bit dodgy though... I used a 10' pole and thought long and hard about how it would swing. Worked like a charm.. don't want to d it again type deal.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan_the_Chemist View Post
    daym ---- looks like someone was testing that "tilt actuator" when they should not have been, or it went off accidentally?

    I do wonder what the story is behind that one...

    Leave a comment:


  • CCWKen
    replied
    What a great reminder! I've got two cable wenches on the little dozer that control a boom lift. It sits outside all the time. I don't know how old the cables are but it scares me every time I use the boom. But all cables scare me. Heard about a guy being cut in half by a broken cable on truck wench. I think I'll be buying new cables soon even though I don't lift many heavy objects any more. 3500# is about the limit of the hydraulic wenches. I know that from when I bought my old Toledo OBI punch press.

    Leave a comment:


  • PStechPaul
    replied
    Or maybe get stainless steel cable, if it will be kept outside in the elements. It seems to be about 80% of the strength of regular steel rope for the same size, and about 50% more expensive. About $7/ft for 1/2" rope.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-wire-rope/=17mr7rf

    All of that wire rope is lubricated. I had never heard of that, but it makes sense.

    I wonder if there is a way to examine or test wire rope to see if it is safe to use? YES!

    http://www.ndttech.com/docs/Specific...12-29-2012.pdf

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/otopdf/2000/oto00064.pdf

    http://www.offshore-mag.com/articles...-interior.html

    http://wirecostructures.com/Resource...ire%20Rope.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • Ironwoodsmith
    replied
    The fiber core also allows the cable to stretch. It compresses and as the cable diameter shrinks it grows in length. I suppose one could unwind a section and inspect the core. The good wire rope is very expensive now. I have 400' of 1/2" sitting outside on a truck's deck winch. Been out there for years. I guess I had better take a look at it.

    Leave a comment:

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