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  • #31
    Notice that he moved away after it hit the floor. Never assume that you will be fast enough to react in time if something goes wrong.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
      daym ---- looks like someone was testing that "tilt actuator" when they should not have been, or it went off accidentally?

      I do wonder what the story is behind that one...
      Long story short, somebody took the bolts that held it to the white machine out, and didn't write up the job. Another group came along to tip the satellite horizontal again to move it, didn't check whether the bolts were in (because the last guy didn't write up the job), and the satellite fell over.

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      • #33
        That is unbelievable negligence on both accounts --- yes esp. the first guy but also the others as simple stuff in plain sight was missed on such a critical thing.

        There's a real scary "mindset" that happens when multiple groups decide to build something very complex, people get brainwashed into just following protocol and as long as they are doing just what they are "supposed to do" and checking their list off then all's good. Not...

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
          He works for a large John Deere dealer in Kentucky, does a little farming and also runs his shop. I've talked with him several times and what you see is what you get. He's not pissing away money on fancy trucks or cars or cloths. His money is in the farm and the shop.

          Well you learn something new every day. Funny a guy with a masters in engineering working as a John Deere dealer. I guess if you are happy thats all that counts.

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          • #35
            I have a lot of respect for this guy, because he put his mistake out for the entire world to see and benefit from. That took big balls. He obviously did it to prevent others from suffering similarly - or much worse.

            Normally I'd say he should have had a spotter. But I don't see how it would have made any difference. Might have even been hurt. Though I'd still say a spotter is strongly encouraged when moving anything this large.

            If the drill had cocked sideways when falling, it might have hit the edge of the trailer and tipped. That could have greatly enlarged the crush zone. It could have also fallen when still partially above the trailer.

            You do see in the video, going frame by frame, how the thing is pretty much already on the ground before he has barely even flinched. Even outside of the drop zone, he could have been hit by straps or chains releasing. That big hook could crush your skull. It seems almost comical to think a helmet could save your life when lifting a big drill, but here you go.

            With all of the energy being released by the concrete beaking, I suppose there was also some risk of pieces hitting someone in the face and blinding them.

            And that big motor. If anyone had been anywhere in the line of the head, that motor and its parts could have broken off and hit them. It was very close to coming off like a bowling ball in that direction. You could have been 5 or 10 feet away and still been smeared.

            When I first started watching, I was really looking at those straps and thought that might be what would fail. The white strap looks like it might be a pretty decent rigging strap, with the sleeve. But that yellow one, I'm not so sure about. It appears to be thin, almost like a cheap ratchet strap. I also have concerns about sharp edges on the straps, and lack of apparent effort to cushion edges.

            He had many single points of failure in the straps. Of course if you use chains to back up the straps, if the strap breaks, then the shock of hitting the chain might break other stuff. So your redundant chain may actually just give false confidence that the load is safer than it is.

            Having an awesome gantry crane like that, with such a high rating, can really give you false confidence.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Glug View Post
              I have a lot of respect for this guy, because he put his mistake out for the entire world to see and benefit from. That took big balls. He obviously did it to prevent others from suffering similarly - or much worse.
              I do too - I did not watch the second half until yesterday and have to say the same thing,
              all you can do is learn from his mistake and have a little empathy for the man.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                I do too - I did not watch the second half until yesterday and have to say the same thing,
                all you can do is learn from his mistake and have a little empathy for the man.
                agreed

                Will make me think more when i'm loading or unloading heavy objects. could you imaging what would have happened if it had been dropped on the trailer.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by pinstripe View Post
                  Notice that he moved away after it hit the floor. Never assume that you will be fast enough to react in time if something goes wrong.
                  Yes,that's the one thing I don't like about manual chain hoists,your'e the first one on the scene in an accident.I would rather be mashing buttons on the end of a long pendant or even better at the end of a radio.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

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                  • #39
                    The story behind the satellite crash is staggering - who knew that Murphy works for NASA? When satellites are being created, they are mounted to the white machine, which is a tilt mechanism so the satellite can be worked on horizontally - ie in its flight attitude. Another crew were attaching another satellite to another tilt mechanism, found they were short of bolts to do this, so borrowed the bolts from the satellite in the picture- and did not put them back. Normally these bolts would stay with each satellite until it removed for launching. The satellite was in its vertical attitude, resting on the platform of the tilt mechanism, and the assembly crew came in to do the next stage which needed the satellite horizontal. Nobody expected the bolts to be missing, so nobody checked that they were still there - the tilt mechanism could be operated by one guy pressing a button - perhaps the rest of the team went for coffee - came back and it was on the floor - I can imagine what was going through the guys mind doing the tilting when it fell off :-)

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                    • #40
                      I do remember in another one of Brian's videos,
                      he lifts his tractor up with the newly installed crane
                      just a few inches off the ground. It was something
                      like a 9000 pound tractor. So he did have some
                      test going on. But rightly so, replace rusty cable.
                      I would not really thought it being a huge issue,
                      but I for sure will consider it now, if I ever get to
                      working on something with rusty cable.

                      -Doozer
                      DZER

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                        Does anyone know the background on this guy. He has stated that he has a masters in mechanical engineering and I have no reason to question this. Based on his videos he has a smaller shop where he makes / machines parts for big pulling tractors.

                        From watching his videos hes got a mint tied up into this barn / shop. Extra thick concrete slab / in floor heat / overhead bridge crane etc etc. Does he have a "day" job that funds this??? Just curious as he has a lot of BIG toys and now a pretty $$ upcoming shop that I just cant see building tractor parts funding.

                        Just curious as i've been curious since I started making videos
                        Yes, Brian is a mechanic at his local John Deere dealer.


                        Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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                        • #42
                          By comparison, I have to wonder what the capacity of the crane was that loaded it onto the trailer?

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Highpower View Post
                            By comparison, I have to wonder what the capacity of the crane was that loaded it onto the trailer?
                            Look at his vid play list. He made 7 rebuilding his shop crane. It is a 15T.

                            https://youtu.be/v0M_Ff5Im6A?list=PL...FiaQ33MFtChzNB

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                            • #44
                              When I worked at GM we had some new machinery come in on semis. The millwrights had a nice 30 ton overhead crane, but one hero told the other millwrights that he had it all handled. He got on his hilo and toppled a $500K precision machine. It went back on the truck to have the machine builder attempt to repair it. The hero millwright got 3 days off of work and about 15 more years of ridicule for his stupid stunt.

                              Brian
                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                              • #45
                                We had that same Carlton radial drill at GM. I drilled a few 3" holes with it. That's where my "throw a rag in it" story came from. Mostly though we used it to twist tracking for passing valve lifters through. Put it on the slowest speed and that thing would twist a boxcar. Massive torque. Massive chips. Those were the days.

                                Brian
                                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                                THINK HARDER

                                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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