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  • Joel
    replied
    Damn Mark, you win.
    An actual brick exiting one's posterior would have been entirely appropriate.

    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    I would have been toast
    Or dross.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhe.1973
    replied
    WOW!!! Just your description gave me goosebumps! Was it some type of ceramic crucible?

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    I learned that once you get it off the ground that the only thing between it and the floor is the rope.
    I once saw a bridge crane or gantry to me lifting a ladle of molten iron, the main hoist gearbox simply exploded, the whole lot was 80' off the ladle pit, gross weight according to the ladle man was just shy of 480 tons, 320 of those tons was liquid and the last temp dip was 1200 C, I have never seen a 15 foot tall ladle falling before, I was running as it was falling, I didn't get very far but behind some stanchions and concrete, according to the driver on the crane it felt as if the crane had left the tracks, vertically.
    The ladle landed on its base, sunk 18" into the concrete floor and a vertical splash hit the ceiling 100' above, there was a massive glow then blackness as all the dust in the building became airborne, like a volcano sort of.
    Lots of people had to change thier pants, it frightened me to the point of shaking, I had a picture of the thing bursting as it landed, amazingly it didn't, if it had I would have been toast
    Mark

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  • jhe.1973
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    ..................By the time we got it back to the shop the truck driver said,no,it was much heavier judging by the way the truck was pulling.After the unloading fiasco a call to Cincinnati the weight was determined to be 57,500 lbs. Quite a bit different........................That's another thing that baffles me,why don't mfgs put the machine weight right there on the tag?Seems that would save a lot of trouble.
    This reminded me of a story that was in Reader's Digest years ago. Someone bought an Ajax upsetter - a gigantic machine used to forge heads on axle shafts, bolts, and the like. It weighed around 500,000 pounds IIRC. A state cop saw the rig w/machine sitting near a motel and stopped the driver when he left in the AM. The truck couldn't pull itself on to the portable scales so they called in a large wrecker and still couldn't winch and drive the rig on the scales. The had to call in another wrecker and use both to push, winch and drive the setup onto the scales. It was something like 300,000 pounds overweight.

    The funniest part of the story was that the county sheriff wouldn't allow the rig to be moved until it was properly transferred to a capable setup - even a call from the US State Department or Defense Department (don't remember which) didn't change his mind. The county trumped the Federal government!

    YAY!

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

    That's another thing that baffles me,why don't mfgs put the machine weight right there on the tag?Seems that would save a lot of trouble.
    Probably the same reason that they don't put prices on machine tools that are for sale. They like mystery.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Highpower View Post
    Yeah, the pulley block and hook on the crane that loaded it looked to be somewhat larger than Brian's. And the guys moving it around all looked like they were wishing they were somewhere else at the time. They didn't seem to display a lot of confidence in what they were doing. Hard to tell what size of cable it was using. I was just curious. Was that Brian that was holding the tether line?
    Not sure if that was Brian or not.The crane that loaded it didn't act to healthy either.I noticed a couple times when they went to raise the load the lift kind of peaked and then sat back down a bit like it had some brake drift.I wonder what that model of Radial Drill really weighs?

    Years ago I nearly lost a Cincinnati Shear we were unloading at work.25 ton lattice boom crane,the shipyard where we loaded it had a fairly new rough terrain hydro loading it and according to the operator the load cell claimed 38,000 lbs.By the time we got it back to the shop the truck driver said,no,it was much heavier judging by the way the truck was pulling.After the unloading fiasco a call to Cincinnati the weight was determined to be 57,500 lbs. Quite a bit different.

    That's another thing that baffles me,why don't mfgs put the machine weight right there on the tag?Seems that would save a lot of trouble.

    Leave a comment:


  • Highpower
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    That's another issue,his hoist being 15 ton I believe was marginal at best lifting that Radial Arm,even if it had healthy cables.
    Yeah, the pulley block and hook on the crane that loaded it looked to be somewhat larger than Brian's. And the guys moving it around all looked like they were wishing they were somewhere else at the time. They didn't seem to display a lot of confidence in what they were doing. Hard to tell what size of cable it was using. I was just curious. Was that Brian that was holding the tether line?

    Leave a comment:


  • Highpower
    replied
    Originally posted by H380 View Post
    Look at his vid play list. He made 7 rebuilding his shop crane. It is a 15T.

    https://youtu.be/v0M_Ff5Im6A?list=PL...FiaQ33MFtChzNB
    I was talking about the crane that put it ON the trailer where he picked up the drill press - not the one he used at home to take it OFF the trailer.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    That's another issue,his hoist being 15 ton I believe was marginal at best lifting that Radial Arm,even if it had healthy cables.

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by Highpower View Post
    By comparison, I have to wonder what the capacity of the crane was that loaded it onto the trailer?

    Probably about a 20 or 30 ton crane. It could probably handle a couple of those radial drills.

    If I were moving the same drill, I would lift the drill about an inch and get it into position and then lift it and back the trailer under it. I'd also use ropes to keep humans away from it at least 10 feet.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    We had that same Carlton radial drill at GM. I drilled a few 3" holes with it. That's where my "throw a rag in it" story came from. Mostly though we used it to twist tracking for passing valve lifters through. Put it on the slowest speed and that thing would twist a boxcar. Massive torque. Massive chips. Those were the days.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    When I worked at GM we had some new machinery come in on semis. The millwrights had a nice 30 ton overhead crane, but one hero told the other millwrights that he had it all handled. He got on his hilo and toppled a $500K precision machine. It went back on the truck to have the machine builder attempt to repair it. The hero millwright got 3 days off of work and about 15 more years of ridicule for his stupid stunt.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • H380
    replied
    Originally posted by Highpower View Post
    By comparison, I have to wonder what the capacity of the crane was that loaded it onto the trailer?
    Look at his vid play list. He made 7 rebuilding his shop crane. It is a 15T.

    https://youtu.be/v0M_Ff5Im6A?list=PL...FiaQ33MFtChzNB

    Leave a comment:


  • Highpower
    replied
    By comparison, I have to wonder what the capacity of the crane was that loaded it onto the trailer?

    Leave a comment:


  • MrPragmaticLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    Does anyone know the background on this guy. He has stated that he has a masters in mechanical engineering and I have no reason to question this. Based on his videos he has a smaller shop where he makes / machines parts for big pulling tractors.

    From watching his videos hes got a mint tied up into this barn / shop. Extra thick concrete slab / in floor heat / overhead bridge crane etc etc. Does he have a "day" job that funds this??? Just curious as he has a lot of BIG toys and now a pretty $$ upcoming shop that I just cant see building tractor parts funding.

    Just curious as i've been curious since I started making videos
    Yes, Brian is a mechanic at his local John Deere dealer.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:

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